Computers & Electronics

UPS backup power supply worth it?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 12th, 2017 6:54 pm
Deal Addict
Dec 12, 2009
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Toronto
Gee wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 9:04 am
Based on his recent reply. It appears the answer is no
I thought that might be the case.
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Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
ROYinTO wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 9:21 am
I thought that might be the case.
I don't understand why he just can't give a straight answer but will spend 10 minutes crafting a reply that tells you basically nothing.

My guess is the $1 part he is referring to is a fuse.
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Dec 12, 2009
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Gee wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 10:37 am
My guess is the $1 part he is referring to is a fuse.
As was I, a circuit breaker would be more expensive.
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Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
ROYinTO wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 10:49 am
As was I, a circuit breaker would be more expensive.
Tube fuse is cheap and easy to replace. But I think they stopped using them in power supplies because there is still a decent charge in the capicators that could give you a decent zap or even kill you. Touch the wrong thing and goodnight Roy
Member
Jan 10, 2017
308 posts
97 upvotes
GTA
Such a fight I'm not gonna join or read.
To be useful to OP, hooking up your modem and router to your ups is a great use case. If power dies your cell phones and laptops can still have internet.
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Jul 6, 2009
223 posts
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ROYinTO wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 9:00 am
I'd prefer you answer the question.
The question is answered with what is always required - reasons why.

No valid relationship exists between your question and what provides protection. Choose if you want spin, hearsay, and propaganda (a soundbyte). Or want an honest and technical answer. A useful answer begins with four paragraphs necessary to understand an answer.

No magic box solution exists. Especially not in a UPS or power strip protector. Those four paragraphs, that make obvious why, also explain what does best protection for about $1 per protected appliance.
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Jul 6, 2009
223 posts
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Gee wrote:
Jul 17th, 2017 10:37 am
My guess is the $1 part he is referring to is a fuse.
Rather than guess, why not instead learn? No fuse protects from surges. Parameters for fuses and circuit breaker make that obvious.

The informed spend abut $1 per appliance for protection even from direct lightning strikes. For protection that remains functional for decades and after multiple direct lightning strikes. Obviously that is not a fuse.

However so many want to argue; keep posting urban myths and technical lies (often promoted by advertising). Nobody has yet asked to learn.
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Mar 14, 2009
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westom wrote:
Jul 20th, 2017 8:13 pm
Rather than guess, why not instead learn? No fuse protects from surges. Parameters for fuses and circuit breaker make that obvious.

The informed spend abut $1 per appliance for protection even from direct lightning strikes. For protection that remains functional for decades and after multiple direct lightning strikes. Obviously that is not a fuse.

However so many want to argue; keep posting urban myths and technical lies (often promoted by advertising). Nobody has yet asked to learn.
I want to learn. Can you please tell us about this $1 device?
I am a Zoomer customer.
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Jul 6, 2009
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SickBeast wrote:
Jul 20th, 2017 8:22 pm
I want to learn. Can you please tell us about this $1 device?
Start with what defines protection. Lightning seeks earth ground. A 20,000 amp electric surge is via a wooden church steeple destructively to earth. Wood is not a good conductor. So 20,000 amps creates a high voltage. 20,000 amps times a high voltage is high energy. Church steeple damaged.

Franklin installed a lightning rod. Now 20,000 amps is via a wire to an earthing electrode. High current creates near zero voltage. 20,000 amps times a near zero voltage is near zero energy. Structure undamaged.

Lightning seeks earth ground. A lightning strike to utility wires far down the street is a direct strike, incoming to every household appliance; destructively to earth. Appliances are not a good conductor. So lightning creates a high voltage. Lightning current times a high voltage dissipates high energy. Appliances damaged.

For over 100 years, facilities that cannot have damage installed superior earthing connected low impedance (ie less than 10 feet) via a 'whole house' protector to an earthing electrode. Then high current creates near zero voltage. 20,000 amps times a near zero voltage is near zero energy. Superior protection already inside appliances is not overwhelmed.

That well proven 'whole house' solution costs about $1 per protected appliance. It is provided by companies known for integrity including Intermatic, Square D, Ditek, Siemens, Polyphaser (an industry benchmark), Syscom, Leviton, ABB, Delta, Erico, General Electric, and Cutler-Hammer (Eaton).

Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate. Above four paragraphs define that. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. What requires most of your attention? Only 'system' component that must always exist - a low impedance connection to earth ground.
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Mar 31, 2017
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I'm sorry, but TTLR.

What's the answer for $1 protection?
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westom wrote:
Jul 20th, 2017 8:47 pm
Start with what defines protection. Lightning seeks earth ground. A 20,000 amp electric surge is via a wooden church steeple destructively to earth. Wood is not a good conductor. So 20,000 amps creates a high voltage. 20,000 amps times a high voltage is high energy. Church steeple damaged.

Franklin installed a lightning rod. Now 20,000 amps is via a wire to an earthing electrode. High current creates near zero voltage. 20,000 amps times a near zero voltage is near zero energy. Structure undamaged.

Lightning seeks earth ground. A lightning strike to utility wires far down the street is a direct strike, incoming to every household appliance; destructively to earth. Appliances are not a good conductor. So lightning creates a high voltage. Lightning current times a high voltage dissipates high energy. Appliances damaged.

For over 100 years, facilities that cannot have damage installed superior earthing connected low impedance (ie less than 10 feet) via a 'whole house' protector to an earthing electrode. Then high current creates near zero voltage. 20,000 amps times a near zero voltage is near zero energy. Superior protection already inside appliances is not overwhelmed.

That well proven 'whole house' solution costs about $1 per protected appliance. It is provided by companies known for integrity including Intermatic, Square D, Ditek, Siemens, Polyphaser (an industry benchmark), Syscom, Leviton, ABB, Delta, Erico, General Electric, and Cutler-Hammer (Eaton).

Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate. Above four paragraphs define that. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. What requires most of your attention? Only 'system' component that must always exist - a low impedance connection to earth ground.
Ok so I read all that but I still don't feel that you have actually directly said what we need to buy. Do we need to purchase and install a lightning rod? Because that's my best guess based on what you just wrote.
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Jul 6, 2009
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Please detail your question. What are you asking?
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Mar 31, 2017
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it feels like I'm talking to some practitioner of Chinese medicine - ask them a question and they use phrases that sound good but makes no sense in hopes that you stop asking.
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westom wrote:
Jul 20th, 2017 8:53 pm
Please detail your question. What are you asking?
Ok I will share something with you. I have a near genius IQ. I have multiple university degrees and a great job. I know for a fact that I am a very good learner. School was always very easy for me. However you are clearly a horrible teacher. You have been asked the same thing multiple times by multiple people. So I am not going to give you the satisfaction of asking again, this is clearly a game to you. I now completely 100% understand the frustration of others in this thread, along with the downvotes. My apologies, guys. This guy is trolling all of us.
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badOne wrote:
Jul 20th, 2017 8:57 pm
it feels like I'm talking to some practitioner of Chinese medicine -
Your question was gobbelty gook. Do you want an answer? Then write a question with cohesive and coherent sentences. Rather than get angry, correct and repost a coherent question. (incoherent post corrected)
Last edited by westom on Jul 20th, 2017 9:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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