Computers & Electronics

Using extended warranty from credit card

  • Last Updated:
  • May 15th, 2019 11:45 am
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2016
155 posts
42 upvotes

Using extended warranty from credit card

Just wondering if anyone has any experience using their extended warranty after buying something with a credit card. I'm trying to get my phone repaired and I wanted to know the best course of action to take so that they would cover the cost.
14 replies
Member
Jan 12, 2017
419 posts
140 upvotes
Not all cards (they call them products) have the extended warranty feature, and the terms and conditions are not the same. It would be up to the incoming agent (so be nice) to make a determination if the product covers the circumstances and your expectations of the product. Used a Visa extended service, for rental insurace and was quite pleased all was coverd but note that the same product no longer offers this (fine details), another paid product has taken its place.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 6, 2005
5782 posts
799 upvotes
Depending on the product they may also make you get a repair quote in order to process your claim if it's determined to be something that is covered (basically mirror the original OEM Warranty so damage still won't be covered).
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 20, 2008
1214 posts
232 upvotes
Coquitlam, BC
I've used my coverage a few times in the past say 10 years. Don't take this as a rule, but anything that was under $200 they didn't bother with a repair/quote, they just told me to buy a new one, submit the receipt, and they'd credit my CC.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 9, 2003
24365 posts
1574 upvotes
Markham, ON
check the terms...some dont cover cellphones.
Sr. Member
Dec 23, 2006
698 posts
135 upvotes
Montreal
Over the years I've used my VISA Avion card for extended warranty on (that I can remember):

iPad 2 (screen failure, $250 replacement from Apple)
MacBook Air Power Adaptor (charger) (Failure, had to buy new, can't remember price)
Tissot Leather Watch Band (Leather was fraying with mild use, new band was $100)

Each time I had to provide a repair/replacement quote that indicated the product was no longer under warranty. Had to provide the original warranty documents so that the could ensure that this would have been covered by the initial expired warranty. I had to provide a copy of the original receipt and the credit card statement that it appeared on.

Usually would take 3 weeks from the time I submitted the paper work and I'd have the money back. Very happy with this service...
_______________________________
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2016
155 posts
42 upvotes
thelefteyeguy wrote:
Aug 18th, 2017 1:34 pm
check the terms...some dont cover cellphones.
Yes, I've checked, I'm using a RBC visa so it says that it is covered.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2016
155 posts
42 upvotes
Ohlias wrote:
Aug 18th, 2017 1:42 pm
Over the years I've used my VISA Avion card for extended warranty on (that I can remember):

iPad 2 (screen failure, $250 replacement from Apple)
MacBook Air Power Adaptor (charger) (Failure, had to buy new, can't remember price)
Tissot Leather Watch Band (Leather was fraying with mild use, new band was $100)

Each time I had to provide a repair/replacement quote that indicated the product was no longer under warranty. Had to provide the original warranty documents so that the could ensure that this would have been covered by the initial expired warranty. I had to provide a copy of the original receipt and the credit card statement that it appeared on.

Usually would take 3 weeks from the time I submitted the paper work and I'd have the money back. Very happy with this service...
So would it be best to get the quote from the manufacturer for the cost if the repair then call them? Also one of my friends told me that someone he knows tried getting a repair done but since the cost was high they ended up refunding them the cost of the original purchase. Have you heard of this?
Sr. Member
Dec 23, 2006
698 posts
135 upvotes
Montreal
insertusername wrote:
Aug 18th, 2017 1:51 pm
So would it be best to get the quote from the manufacturer for the cost if the repair then call them? Also one of my friends told me that someone he knows tried getting a repair done but since the cost was high they ended up refunding them the cost of the original purchase. Have you heard of this?
Yes, you are only covered for up to the original purchase price. For example, if a cell phone is covered (I dunno, never tried) and you paid a subsidised $400 for an $800 iphone, they will cover the repair up to $400. They warranty coverage does not extend beyond the original purchase price.
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Deal Addict
Feb 29, 2012
2654 posts
1449 upvotes
Richmond
First you need to recognize that you are dealing with an independent insurance company, not your credit-card issuer, and not the manufacturer.

After determining your eligibility and the claimed purchase eligibility, they will ask you to submit either proof that the item is unrepairable, or a estimate of the repair cost, from the manufacturer or their local authorized service rep. In many cases there will be either a shipping cost involved, or the local authorized service rep will request a non-refundable up-front fee to look at the item. In particular if they already know that the item is unrepairable, they also know that there's no money in it for them other than the up-front fee. The credit card insurance will not cover either the shipping cost or the service rep's non-refundable fee in the event that the item is unrepairable.

In some cases the local authorized service rep may not be an option. Either there isn't one, or they refuse to look at an out-of-warranty item that they know is not repairable, or they want a ridiculous non-refundable fee. In that case the insurance company may agree to have another qualified repair centre look at the item and make a determination or give an estimate, but you must get their agreement.

Then you send in your paperwork and wait for them to either send a cheque for replacement cost (up to but not exceeding original price) or an authorization to proceed with repair. If repaired, you send them the bill for reimbursement, not to exceed the pre-authorized amount.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 31, 2017
5467 posts
2279 upvotes
There is a very strong chance they will demand you submit a quote for the repair costs, even if it cannot be repaired, or costs more to be repaired than brand new. They still want it. Even a quote from the tech support from of the company in an email or forum would be sufficient.

The insurance company will also want a copy of the receipt and the credit card statement that had the initial purchase on it. You might have to ask the cc to go electronic for a week in order to dig up the electronic credit card statements if you're on paper statements.

if you submit all paperwork as requested they cannot deny you. If they try then contact the bank that issued your CC and since they are the insurance company's client will have more leverage on them.
Member
Dec 11, 2007
267 posts
90 upvotes
I thought I’d mention my experience here. I purchased a charging cable on my Tangerine MasterCard and it failed in about 18months. I submitted an insurance claim to Assurant who is the extended warranty insurance provider for Tangerine’s MasterCard. I was asked to send them the following:

❑ Original vendor’s sales receipt showing the cost, date and description of purchase.
❑ The account statement showing the charge
❑ Copy of the original manufacturer’s warranty
❑ Written repair estimate

I was able to send them the first three but not the fourth figuring that I wouldn’t be able to get a repair estimate on a phone charging cable. They responded back by saying that since I didn’t send in a repair estimate, I would have to send the item to them for them to assess if the item does in fact not work, in which case they would then send me a cheque.

The biggest inconvenience of the entire process is having to provide a repair estimate.
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
1539 posts
1378 upvotes
Vancouver
narmak wrote:
May 15th, 2019 9:12 am
The biggest inconvenience of the entire process is having to provide a repair estimate.
That was my experience too. What I did was to go to a small local electronics repair shop and simply offer them $20 to look at the item and declare it unrepairable on their official form. They gave it a 1-minute test to verify that it was dead, and gave me the required note. Accepted by Allianz insurance.
Member
Dec 11, 2007
267 posts
90 upvotes
Scote64 wrote:
May 15th, 2019 10:31 am
That was my experience too. What I did was to go to a small local electronics repair shop and simply offer them $20 to look at the item and declare it unrepairable on their official form. They gave it a 1-minute test to verify that it was dead, and gave me the required note. Accepted by Allianz insurance.
Yea that’s probably the quickest way to do it if it’s going to take them time to come up with a repair cost.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 31, 2017
5467 posts
2279 upvotes
The repair cost if it is a large company it will have a support email or forum and you can tell them it's for CC extended warranty purposes and describe to them the symptoms and ask them the repair costs and that would be accepted as written cost estimate, provided the person who responds to you works for the company (you can ask them straight off if they work for the company).

The insurance company just wants something, to make you jump through another hoop. It needs not have a company header on a piece of paper for that to happen.

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