Art and Photography

using photography spotlights in the living room?

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  • Dec 22nd, 2010 5:58 pm
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Jr. Member
Feb 22, 2009
157 posts
1 upvote
Canada

using photography spotlights in the living room?

I was thinking of buying a spotlight lamp to put in the living room instead of a regular floor lamp.

Image
Image
Image
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Most of those are pretty expensive though. I was thinking of buying real photography lighting instead to put in the living room since the real stuff turns out to be much cheaper. Anyone has any experience using real photography lighting kits in the living room? Would it be too bright?

Image

That's a real lighting kit including 3 spotlights for only 200$.

Any thoughts?
15 replies
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
5207 posts
337 upvotes
Toronto
Just one thought: this is a PHOTOGRAPHY forum and not a DECORATING forum.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 22, 2009
157 posts
1 upvote
Canada
Your point? I'm asking a question to people that are most likely to know the answer.

I'm asking if lighting kits normally used for PHOTOGRAPHY can be used as everyday lamps if some adjustments are made like bulb wattage and such.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 16, 2008
2510 posts
262 upvotes
Toronto
adassus wrote:
Dec 19th, 2010 3:20 am
I was thinking of buying a spotlight lamp to put in the living room instead of a regular floor lamp.

Image
Image
Image
Image

Most of those are pretty expensive though. I was thinking of buying real photography lighting instead to put in the living room since the real stuff turns out to be much cheaper. Anyone has any experience using real photography lighting kits in the living room? Would it be too bright?

Image

That's a real lighting kit including 3 spotlights for only 200$.

Any thoughts?


Where can you get that kit for $200? I'd be interested!
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
5207 posts
337 upvotes
Toronto
adassus wrote:
Dec 19th, 2010 9:22 pm
Your point? I'm asking a question to people that are most likely to know the answer.

I'm asking if lighting kits normally used for PHOTOGRAPHY can be used as everyday lamps if some adjustments are made like bulb wattage and such.

My point is that lights used for photography are designed for flash or relatively short duration use. I think you might be better off looking for lighting used for film or video or theatre.
Deal Addict
May 19, 2003
2072 posts
133 upvotes
The halogen bulbs for these things are typically minimum 250W. They also burn hot and die fast. Would not recommend to use for everyday lighting
unless you have money to burn.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 22, 2009
157 posts
1 upvote
Canada
shutterbug wrote:
Dec 19th, 2010 11:08 pm
The halogen bulbs for these things are typically minimum 250W. They also burn hot and die fast. Would not recommend to use for everyday lighting
unless you have money to burn.

That pretty much answers my question. I was hoping to be able to use regular 40W halogen bulbs for these things.

That lighting kit can be found on TubeTape.net
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 11, 2003
5722 posts
172 upvotes
Toronto
Might get a little bit hot.
That's exactly why they call them "hot lights" :)

Brent
--------------------------------------------------------------

"Any more irrelevant comments to pull out of your ***** ?"
"Your comments seem to be r ectal plucks." Pete_Coach

HEATWARE.... if you bought from me ... thanks
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2005
1694 posts
115 upvotes
Instead of spending 100s of dollars, you could start with making these:

Image

I use these for film and photos, and they work great. And best of all RFD cheap. They're height adjustable, easy to transport, and perfect for studio use. Only downside is that, you need to let the energy saving bulbs heat up for a minute or two, but honestly, that isn't much waiting time at all.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 7, 2005
2808 posts
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whoever seating next to a 500+ watt heat lamp will either melt their makeup off the face or have their Axe hair gel catch in flame...
Sr. Member
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Sep 11, 2006
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Raead wrote:
Dec 21st, 2010 4:07 am
whoever seating next to a 500+ watt heat lamp will either melt their makeup off the face or have their Axe hair gel catch in flame...

buwhaahhaa...


Best answer of the today!!!
Sr. Member
Feb 5, 2009
750 posts
31 upvotes
Chocolinx wrote:
Dec 21st, 2010 12:34 am
Instead of spending 100s of dollars, you could start with making these:

Image

I use these for film and photos, and they work great. And best of all RFD cheap. They're height adjustable, easy to transport, and perfect for studio use. Only downside is that, you need to let the energy saving bulbs heat up for a minute or two, but honestly, that isn't much waiting time at all.

I think OP wanted something a bit more 'fashionable'

But, Wow! look at all the pvc tubes! :lol:

A couple of questions, what do you have wrapped around the lamp for diffusion?
and where did you get the instructions to make the hand held dslr holder in the background and does it work well for you?
Deal Addict
Oct 21, 2006
1849 posts
131 upvotes
looks like trace paper.

Anyways, I was looking for some lights for my living room. I was thinking I could buy some of those spotlights they use to light up the sky at big events, and then replace the light bulbs with 15w fluorescents. something like this: light

What do you think, guys?
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2005
1694 posts
115 upvotes
dealCker wrote:
Dec 22nd, 2010 7:38 pm
I think OP wanted something a bit more 'fashionable'

But, Wow! look at all the pvc tubes! :lol:

A couple of questions, what do you have wrapped around the lamp for diffusion?
and where did you get the instructions to make the hand held dslr holder in the background and does it work well for you?
http://www.youtube.com/user/thefrugalfilmmaker

This guy has some really cool PVC DIY stuff :)

For diffusion I used wax paper or cookie sheet. It's made to go in an oven so I'm 100% sure it won't catch fire LOL But it works pretty well, since it's transparent.

And the Camera Stabilizer works great! With proper technique you can do some really fancy stuff.
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