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very sick 14-year old dog

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  • May 15th, 2017 3:58 am
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[OP]
Newbie
Jun 21, 2016
14 posts
3 upvotes

very sick 14-year old dog

Hello, I have just discovered my 14 year old Pomeranian has cancer? (Uterine Vaginal Tumors I believe) yesterday. The vet told my family the only way to treat it is to perform a surgery. However, because she is very old, chances of success is unknown and even if performed successfully we don't know how long she can last. She hasn't ate for a few days already and when she drinks water, she throws up half of them. Should we let her go naturally or try the surgery and hope everything goes through? Thank you for the advice.
23 replies
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 9, 2007
7215 posts
2228 upvotes
Toronto
Sorry to hear. However their lifespan is 12 – 16 years. At this stage, I don't think she'll last long, even with surgery.
CN1217 wrote:
Apr 1st, 2017 12:08 am
Hello, I have just discovered my 14 year old Pomeranian has cancer? (Uterine Vaginal Tumors I believe) yesterday. The vet told my family the only way to treat it is to perform a surgery. However, because she is very old, chances of success is unknown and even if performed successfully we don't know how long she can last. She hasn't ate for a few days already and when she drinks water, she throws up half of them. Should we let her go naturally or try the surgery and hope everything goes through? Thank you for the advice.

WOULD SOMEBODY THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!!
Sr. Member
Oct 13, 2014
862 posts
324 upvotes
Somewhere, ON
CN1217 wrote:
Apr 1st, 2017 12:08 am
Hello, I have just discovered my 14 year old Pomeranian has cancer? (Uterine Vaginal Tumors I believe) yesterday. The vet told my family the only way to treat it is to perform a surgery. However, because she is very old, chances of success is unknown and even if performed successfully we don't know how long she can last. She hasn't ate for a few days already and when she drinks water, she throws up half of them. Should we let her go naturally or try the surgery and hope everything goes through? Thank you for the advice.
Do the dog a favour and have the vet put her down. Nothing is worse than watching a loved pet whither away and most likely die in pain.
“When you marry the right woman, you are ‘complete.’ If you marry the wrong woman, you are ‘finished.’ And, if the right one catches you with the wrong one, you are ‘completely finished.'"
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
2952 posts
437 upvotes
What did your vet recommend? Personally I would probably have your pup euthanized but since I do not have all of the facts I will not jump to conclusions.

If you trust your vet, he/she will provide the best recommendation.

We have a 13 year old Eskimo - very similar to your pup. The surgery is one thing, chemo is another.

I fully understand how hard a decision this will be for you.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 21, 2016
14 posts
3 upvotes
Thank you for the responses, We will be seeing the vet tomorrow and will choose the option that has minimum suffering for her. It'd be a hard decision though...
Sr. Member
Mar 19, 2013
526 posts
134 upvotes
Prince Albert, Sask.
Not an easy decision. If your dog is not in pain, I would carry on, give her lots of attention and love. If there are in pain, the tough decision has to be made. Done it a couple of times, not easy. Surgery may be an option, it maybe short term and it comes with a cost. Lots to consider. Good luck and whatever you decide is the right thing to do. Keep us posted.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 21, 2016
14 posts
3 upvotes
We just revisited the vet today and they told us the success rate is 20% ... I think we might just let her go naturally since she isn't in pain...
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2009
1483 posts
248 upvotes
Markham
Sorry to hear. It is a tough choice.
Deal Expert
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Jul 22, 2006
20629 posts
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CN1217 wrote:
Apr 2nd, 2017 1:02 pm
We just revisited the vet today and they told us the success rate is 20% ... I think we might just let her go naturally since she isn't in pain...
You are doing the right thing
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jul 25, 2008
678 posts
183 upvotes
Toronto
If your pup is not eating and vomiting up half her water, it seems that her quality of life is definitely affected. I'm not sure about how much pain she is in. Are you sure letting nature take its course on her is the right choice? Did the doctor recommend euthanasia yet?

I'm really sorry to hear, but during this time you have with her while she is still willing and able, give her steak, burgers, whatever to make her happy and take her out on a very nice walk.
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 31, 2008
9017 posts
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Toronto
CN1217 wrote:
Apr 2nd, 2017 1:02 pm
We just revisited the vet today and they told us the success rate is 20% ... I think we might just let her go naturally since she isn't in pain...
Hmm, what do you mean by 'naturally'? You shouldn't let your dog pass like the way a human does, who gets treated with IV, drugs, treatment, hospital/hospice care.

The real most humane way to do it is to euthanize your dog. I know it's tough to accept, but really, that is the best you can do for your best friend. It will be painful. I too had strong denial, blamed others for what happened that caused her to be put down at that moment unexpected (re-injuring of an old hip injury.. mentally was fine but at 13 years, did have issues).

When I realized it genuinely, without really mentally acknowleding it, I did break down. And this vet did say at the time, I thought was heartless and cruel... with pets, especially dogs, they are here for a short time and are always ready to go. It is true. When my dog finally did go, as I was in the room, in a way, it was a relief now seeing her suffer.

I read somewhere, which is, near the end, all I had was this image of her suffering, in pain, etc,, but in due time you will remember the good and happy times. Looking back, it was absolutely the right thing to do, and trying to prolong the inevitable, really wouldn't have been the most wisest option.

Now, depending on the whole cost, procedure, it might be worth a shot, but really, just be ready for potentially making a touch decision. Maybe not now, but in soon time. Hoping for the best.
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
590 posts
202 upvotes
British Columbia
A question to ask yourself is: what is your dogs quality of life? For most dogs no longer interested in eating and/or not having the "get up and go" mentality dogs thrive on in life are good indicators the end is near.

I too hope that you do not mean to let your dog die at home. On the outside it may appear pain free, but dogs cannot speak, and a dog showing outward signs of pain is something they do not normally do. Some animals can hang in there for an extremely long period of time; they can be emaciated and have an exceedingly poor quality of life where they do not even have the energy to move or stand on their own. This prolonged suffering is not in their best interest.

Please find it in yourself to end their suffering through euthanasia when the time comes, which could be today or could be next month -- but they will let you know when that is. They have had a whole lifetime of happiness with you, and now you have to do the hardest thing possible... but it is the right thing to do.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 21, 2016
14 posts
3 upvotes
Thank you all for your advice. We will euthanize her tomorrow to end her pain. We will miss her forever.
Sr. Member
User avatar
May 12, 2009
639 posts
129 upvotes
OP - I put my dog down 1.5 years ago and I still miss her everyday, but if I could go back in time I would have done it earlier. I couldn't let her go and that was just selfish. You are in my thoughts.
Deal Addict
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Jul 19, 2012
1612 posts
163 upvotes
she's 14 and 20% success rate?

IF.. she's suffering and in pain, I would put her to sleep.

don't let her die naturally, if she's not eating and in pain!!

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