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Veterinary Dentist

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 5th, 2019 6:38 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 2, 2006
786 posts
185 upvotes
Mississauga

Veterinary Dentist

Hey guys.

My dog (12 year old lab in great condition health wise) needs some dental work.

She gets her teeth cleaned about every year and a half at the vet. However, last time, they told us she needed to have 12 teeth pulled out.

She already had a few teeth missing from birth, and another 12 worries me that it might affect her quality of life (as she loves eating!).

When I asked if they ever fix teeth (like they do in humans), they said no, only pull them out.

So I was wondering if anyone knows of a Veterinary Dentist that actually fixes teeth to give us a few more options.

Thank you all kindly for any advice and input.

- Budha
9 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 24, 2003
14499 posts
1820 upvotes
Toronto
I sympathize with you and your dog.

My cat is 12.5 years old and had a few teeth pulled three months ago. He had been eating dry food from the time he was 6 months old and had no choice but to switch to wet food. The vet told me that, as his gums heal, they will harden over and he may go back to eating dry food. This is exactly what has happened and he's now eating a mixture of dry food pellets and wet food. He's now back to his old self because the bothersome teeth were removed and his gums have healed.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 2, 2006
786 posts
185 upvotes
Mississauga
audit13 wrote:
Dec 13th, 2018 4:02 pm
I sympathize with you and your dog.

My cat is 12.5 years old and had a few teeth pulled three months ago. He had been eating dry food from the time he was 6 months old and had no choice but to switch to wet food. The vet told me that, as his gums heal, they will harden over and he may go back to eating dry food. This is exactly what has happened and he's now eating a mixture of dry food pellets and wet food. He's now back to his old self because the bothersome teeth were removed and his gums have healed.
That is the same thing my vet said. However, it just seems like so many teeth. It is worrisome.

Her gums are actually in pretty good condition.
Deal Guru
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Feb 24, 2003
14499 posts
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Toronto
babybudha wrote:
Dec 13th, 2018 4:46 pm
That is the same thing my vet said. However, it just seems like so many teeth. It is worrisome.

Her gums are actually in pretty good condition.
The problem with trying to fix the teeth, as explained to me by the vet, is the small size of the teeth and jaw.

I hope your dog isn't in any pain. Before my cat's surgery, he spent 90% of his time sleeping. He was probably feeling a lot of discomfort before the surgery and for about a week after. He's fine now and I regret not having his teeth checked much sooner.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 2, 2006
786 posts
185 upvotes
Mississauga
audit13 wrote:
Dec 13th, 2018 5:12 pm
The problem with trying to fix the teeth, as explained to me by the vet, is the small size of the teeth and jaw.

I hope your dog isn't in any pain. Before my cat's surgery, he spent 90% of his time sleeping. He was probably feeling a lot of discomfort before the surgery and for about a week after. He's fine now and I regret not having his teeth checked much sooner.
Yes, my Vet mentioned he doesn't like working on cat teeth (gets his wife, who is also a Vet to work on them) because they are so small and fragile (compared to a dog), and require a special touch.

I don't expect to spare the smaller teeth, but I hate the idea of pulling out all (or most of) her back molars.

She doesn't seem to be in any pain at all, and there are no abscesses or anything like that.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 2, 2006
786 posts
185 upvotes
Mississauga
Bump. Anyone else know of a actual "Vet Dentist?"
Sr. Member
Apr 25, 2011
886 posts
418 upvotes
British Columbia
If those 12 teeth need to be pulled, then get them pulled. Animals do not display pain the same as humans and I guarantee they hurt.

Dogs and cats can frequently require teeth to be pulled and the damage may only be visable under the gumline, such as bone loss and abscesses.

No there are no "dentists", and if such a thing existed it would cost absurd amounts. Dogs 99.9% of the time don't even get their teeth brushed once daily so really, what would be the point? Pulling 12 teeth as it is will be extremely costly.

Veterinarians that pull the teeth however do have skill at taking and interrupting dental x-rays and removing the teeth correctly. Sometimes going to a dental specialist is required, as not all vets have the knowledge to correctly remove teeth. It can be difficult.
Member
Dec 7, 2009
243 posts
101 upvotes
burbs
You won't find many vets that do fillings on dogs. If you google it you may find some in GTA. The pricing may surprise you.

Our dog has a bad ulcerative gingivitis and the ultimate solution is to have all his teeth removed to prevent the reoccurrence of the ulcers. We had the same feelings as you but our new vet assured us he will adapt. They are designed to adapt to challenges. He has a dog with no teeth and the receptionist has a cat with no teeth and both are doing fine. The gums harden and they adapt.
Deal Addict
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Aug 2, 2003
2013 posts
636 upvotes
Beautiful B.C.
babybudha wrote:
Dec 13th, 2018 3:15 pm

So I was wondering if anyone knows of a Veterinary Dentist that actually fixes teeth to give us a few more options.
This vet is in Etobicoke. Based on the list of services, it sounds like they do this type of dentistry. They also mention the possibility of a referral to a "dental specialist." To me, that would seem to be something that other vets could do also.

http://www.bloormillvet.ca/our-services.pml
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