Careers

VIEW: Companies should post Compensation for Positions.

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 22nd, 2017 1:14 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2009
3475 posts
851 upvotes

VIEW: Companies should post Compensation for Positions.

In the GTA, it seems more and more companies do not post salaries or wages for a position.

I understand that as a candidate, you should know - roughly at least - how much you are worth.

However, I, and other people I know, have gone for an interview and once the deal is close to done, the topic of compensation comes up. I have told them what I think is acceptable, they scoff and say that they want to offer something lower. At this point, I make the effort to validate why I think my range is acceptable or maybe what they think is acceptable is not - for me at least.

I think to avoid this, companies should post a general range for a position. This would mean that candidates wouldn't waste their time for a position that will not or can not pay what they need.

I think posting at least the lower range would cause less frustration and less wasted time.

Of course, for more senior positions, a range may not be needed. But I think for 80-90% of the jobs out there, it really should be posted.

What does RFD think?
25 replies
Deal Guru
Jun 30, 2006
13681 posts
2254 upvotes
Toronto
I agree. But again they don't post a range because companies always lowball people. Generally, I would suggest always ask about the salary range when you do the first phone interview with HR. If they don't provide one, you can give them your expectations to see if it fits into the range. Doesn't really make sense wasting time and going for interview without knowing if the job fits your range requirements. Some sites online do ask for your requirements when you apply, so I guess that is a way to filter people out.
Member
Jan 15, 2017
217 posts
131 upvotes
I agree. It is almost impossible to gauge a salary range based on job title as many job titles are completely useless. Most of us are also not willing to take a substantial pay cut in order to accept a new job, so it is a complete waste of time for all involved to arrive at the selection stage only to find out that the salary is not suitable.
Deal Addict
Mar 15, 2005
4792 posts
350 upvotes
Usually the person who names their number first is at a disadvantage, and considering the company has the commodity that people want (job), why would the put themselves down a peg?

Not saying I disagree with you, just playing devil's advocate
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 13, 2010
4519 posts
332 upvotes
Scarborough
agree, a general range or amount should be provided, so that people who're looking for higher can avoid applying altogether and not waste time.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 18, 2005
16567 posts
1619 upvotes
GTA West
If every company did this, their own employees would use existing job posting from competitors as leverage to ask for salary increases all the time.
- Not Collecting AIR MILES Since 2016/07 -
- Casual Gastronomist -
Sr. Member
Sep 4, 2007
780 posts
146 upvotes
Edmonton
Jucius Maximus wrote:
Mar 18th, 2017 3:38 pm
If every company did this, their own employees would use existing job posting from competitors as leverage to ask for salary increases all the time.
Information asymmetry at work. Companies use it to their advantage. Some people are overpaid. Some people are underpaid. Most likely people are underpaid on average.

More information is always better. It facilitates more fair exchange. Of course, companies are in position of power over this information and they want to keep it that way.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2009
3475 posts
851 upvotes
Jucius Maximus wrote:
Mar 18th, 2017 3:38 pm
If every company did this, their own employees would use existing job posting from competitors as leverage to ask for salary increases all the time.
The majority of medium to large companies participate in compensation surveys.

They already have an idea of what their competition is doing.

Of course a company can pay more to skilled people.

What I am suggesting is that companies provide more of a floor than anything else.

The floor shouldn't be based on the idea that candidates are clueless and therefore $0 is the floor.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13037 posts
613 upvotes
As mentioned, companies know where they stand with regards to their major competitors....and how it is broken down. So if a candidate (or internal employee) would say that I could go to X and earn 15k more base...then we could say, "yes that is true, but your upper end is capped $Y or that bonus is only rate per point without multipliers". Happens all the time.

You should know the range going into the interview. I would ask a range, just as you would respond to them.

As for posting an actual value...that is difficult as there could be a very wide range based on role and responsibility. Even hiring for something like a Marketing Coordinator. If I ended hiring a new grad or early career candidate, I could be paying 40k. A seasoned high performer that I could task with more challenging projects or brings far more experience could earn closer to 70k.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 23, 2009
3475 posts
851 upvotes
A candidate should know what they are worth, but if the company is only budgeted or willing to pay $45K range and the candidate would not consider moving or accepting less than $70K, than it would be in HR's best interest to not even waste time with that candidate.

As it stands, it seems like companies are almost hoping that candidates don't know their true value.

If the company budgets $70K and the candidate says $45K is what they are worth, will the company pay them $70K?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 16, 2012
2948 posts
270 upvotes
Mississauga
I think it shows good organizational behavior for companies to post compensation details even if its a range.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 8, 2007
4276 posts
614 upvotes
Yes, they should make comp known ... for standard positions .... i.e. all call centre reps make X .... all associate-level (post-MBA) consultants make Y ....

Once you start getting into middle management and Director+ levels, all bets are off, because your 'value' to the org is highly subjective and dependent on what you're working on, and who you're working for ...
Mark77 wrote:"All aspiring students should go into the financial services - engineering is, and always has been, a poor choice for our brightest minds ... and TodayHello is my Hero ..."
Hydropwnics wrote:"TodayHello is a certified hustler and original gangster."
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 27, 2003
745 posts
121 upvotes
Earth
Public sector postings have compensation ranges posted all the time.

Private sector should do the same, but then again if it goes against their advantage why do it?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 19, 2012
1570 posts
154 upvotes
Canada
I agree. Why waste anyone's time and expectation.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Apr 16, 2006
5805 posts
291 upvotes
416_guy wrote:
Mar 19th, 2017 12:35 pm
Public sector postings have compensation ranges posted all the time.

Private sector should do the same, but then again if it goes against their advantage why do it?
One of the few things the public sector does that makes complete sense that private sector seems to not do on a regular basis.

The topic of salary is generally taboo until later on in the interview process. If neither side can come to a mutually acceptable salary range and if this would have been known at the outset, a lot of time and resources could have been saved on both sides in not spending time on something that wouldn't bear any fruit.
× < >
Rotate image Save Cancel

Top