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[WAGJAG] $135 for 1,500 litres 10 Cents Esso Fuel Savings Card AND $10 Esso Gift Card

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 13th, 2017 8:33 am
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Dec 4, 2010
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pauliaK wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 5:33 pm
I am just having a problem with the whole idea of prepaying $125 for a discount that is a mere $0.0167 off a litre. This is a horrible deal at its face value.

Average gas price in Canada today is $1.224 according to gas buddy. So if you’re saving $0.017 that’s 1.36% off. If you add that 4.5% from GCR then you get $0.0207 off a litre or 1.69% off.

Title for this thread should read something like “prepay $125 for 1.36-1.69% off you gas”. Doesn’t sound all that hot, does it?

16% is just a gimmicky number to make it sound something worthwhile while it’s ~1.6% savings over a looong period of tine in reality.
Agree!!! :)
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Penrose wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 12:56 pm
you can use the 10 dollar gift certificate to buy gas right away so the real cost is 125.00 dollars for 150 dollars worth of discount. assuming an average of 8L / 100 km, you'd have to drive 18750 km to use up the 1500 litres. (18750/100*8 = 1500)..do the math. for some people that is 1 year of driving , for others it is 2 years driving, but there is no expiry on the card so you can use it for as long as it takes to consume 1500 litres. and there is also the option to sell the unexpired portion at cost if you don't need the card.

.....does that mean I can sell the unused card for $150?
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Actually layer this with the Shoppers Drugmart promotion and it works out sensibly. See if you go to Esso regularly than this can be layered nicely. In itself, the math works as follows:

1) 1500 * 0.1 = $150 , this is 1500 litres times savings of $0.10 per litre, hence, savings. And...
2) 150 + 10 = $160, which is 1) from above plus the $10 giftcard they provide.

So, how does this stack up? Well, $135 is cash spent, and 160-135=25, so percentage wise this is 25/135=18.518518%=~ roughly 18.52% return. Which isn't bad, keep in mind though this represents 1500 in cash outlay roughly, since gas is $1.xx per litre. Compared to SDM, which has a 8% return rate not including bonus redemption factor.
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Sep 22, 2009
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IntrepidRT wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 12:20 pm
....or you can save 85% on fuel costs by switching to an electric car. Honestly, I drive 25,000km/year and we're buying our second EV now (the Ontario $14k incentive is a large factor but even without it you'd save money), you'll never regret switching. I spend less than $500 per year on Ontario hydro to run my EV. My car (Leaf) ends up being free when factoring in 7 years of fuel savings - I'm half way there already.

Anyone who lives in Ontario, Quebec or B.C. who doesn't do the math on EV ownership is doing themselves (and their wallets) a disservice.

I got tired of the games the fuel companies play with their pricing, it's not like the average person doesn't have the option to give them the middle finger. I have a friend who doesn't even have a place to plug in at his apartment, fully dependent on public charging who has spent $41 to drive 38,000km in 6 months of owning his Bolt (he's obviously a bit crazy, but he's proof that it can be done even without access to a plug at home by buying a long range EV like the Bolt).
Glad you are enjoying your subsidized car paid for by your neighbours tax dollars.
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theguru wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 6:49 am

Glad you are enjoying your subsidized car paid for by your neighbours tax dollars.
My neighbours are also enjoying their EVs. Ford Focus Electric and another Nissan Leaf. Seriously, a drop in the bucket compared to the $3 Billion in oil subsidies handed out every year by the CDN government. I'm also helping with using all of that excess off peak power we have in Ontario. Hydro bill was $95 last month for a 2000 sq ft house and 2000km of driving, it would be even lower if I lived in the GTA with their crazy good super off peak plans :(
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IntrepidRT wrote:
Nov 7th, 2017 1:10 pm
Lining up for 30 minutes to save $0.10/litre at the Guelph Costco is just an amazing experience. Really glad I don't have to do that. Yes, I've done it before in my wife's 'RFD' Sonata Hybrid, really really sucks. We're currently shopping for a much more fuel efficient vehicle than the 5.0L/100km Sonata considering my Leaf is around 1.3L/100km equivalent cost, we try not to drive the hybrid more than we absolutely have to (explains the 84,000km driven on my 2015 electric car without even having a L3 charge port).
Remember the oil crisis in the 70's and the gas wars in the 80's? Yeah, that's happening at Costco every day. No thanks....lol
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IntrepidRT wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 6:57 am
My neighbours are also enjoying their EVs. Ford Focus Electric and another Nissan Leaf. Seriously, a drop in the bucket compared to the $3 Billion in oil subsidies handed out every year by the CDN government. I'm also helping with using all of that excess off peak power we have in Ontario. Hydro bill was $95 last month for a 2000 sq ft house and 2000km of driving, it would be even lower if I lived in the GTA with their crazy good super off peak plans :(
I'd assume you have a gas dryer. That, or you don't have a lot of people in your household. Last electric bill for me (and I'm in Kitchener) was $105. Mostly off-peak as well. Gas stove/oven and water heater, electric dryer though (and that's where most of the hydro goes to). All electronics (like TV's) are up-to-date and sucking a whopping 20-70 watts per set.

I'm still driving gas, about $1,500 yearly - not worth it to convert yet, especially since I travel heavy occasionally (so the Leaf wouldn't work for me -- the Bolt probably would though). I am hoping once this car kicks the bucket (probably another 8 or 9 years) that 400KM range vehicles will be the norm, and $25,000 price tags will be the norm.

BTW: How good is the HVAC in the car? Does it affect the range a lot (summer heat, winter cold).
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IntrepidRT wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 12:20 pm
....or you can save 85% on fuel costs by switching to an electric car. Honestly, I drive 25,000km/year and we're buying our second EV now (the Ontario $14k incentive is a large factor but even without it you'd save money), you'll never regret switching. I spend less than $500 per year on Ontario hydro to run my EV. My car (Leaf) ends up being free when factoring in 7 years of fuel savings - I'm half way there already.

Anyone who lives in Ontario, Quebec or B.C. who doesn't do the math on EV ownership is doing themselves (and their wallets) a disservice.

I got tired of the games the fuel companies play with their pricing, it's not like the average person doesn't have the option to give them the middle finger. I have a friend who doesn't even have a place to plug in at his apartment, fully dependent on public charging who has spent $41 to drive 38,000km in 6 months of owning his Bolt (he's obviously a bit crazy, but he's proof that it can be done even without access to a plug at home by buying a long range EV like the Bolt).
Have you done the math on how long it’s going to take to break even on buying on new EV car vs. keeping a fully fonctional gas car (including the taxes you paid on the car, depreciation, etc.)?
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jeff1970 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 7:17 am

I'd assume you have a gas dryer. That, or you don't have a lot of people in your household. Last electric bill for me (and I'm in Kitchener) was $105. Mostly off-peak as well. Gas stove/oven and water heater, electric dryer though (and that's where most of the hydro goes to). All electronics (like TV's) are up-to-date and sucking a whopping 20-70 watts per set.

I'm still driving gas, about $1,500 yearly - not worth it to convert yet, especially since I travel heavy occasionally (so the Leaf wouldn't work for me -- the Bolt probably would though). I am hoping once this car kicks the bucket (probably another 8 or 9 years) that 400KM range vehicles will be the norm, and $25,000 price tags will be the norm.

BTW: How good is the HVAC in the car? Does it affect the range a lot (summer heat, winter cold).
Yes, we do have a gas dryer.......a lot cheaper to run than an electric dryer. Induction stove as well - probably more efficient than radiant. We use the toaster oven for at least 50% of our cooking.

My vehicle was $20k plus tax, but 160km range. My new Leaf (coming January) should be 250km+ range, but will be also be high $20ks but will have autonomous single lane driving and other features.

HVAC is fine, I run heated seats & steering wheel all winter long.....because I have the base heater system, it draws 4kW and I don't use it a ton in the winter, that's what pre-heating the car is for.
max9505672 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 8:21 am
Have you done the math on how long it’s going to take to break even on buying on new EV car vs. keeping a fully fonctional gas car (including the taxes you paid on the car, depreciation, etc.)?
With the Ontario $14k incentives? My Nissan Leaf S was basically the same price as a brand new similar mid-size gas car with the same features & same power (around $20k + tax). The new ones are a bit more money but come with a lot more technology. If you look at it with gas savings, the car is free after 7 years of driving 25,000km/year. The Leaf is among the best for value though, if you look at something like a Bolt, the value proposition decreases because of the 60kWh battery pack you have to pay for.

If you drive an average amount (20,000km+ per year), buying a brand new higher value EV like a Nissan Leaf, a Hyundai Ioniq Electric, a Kia Soul EV or a VW eGolf (with current Ontario incentives) WILL end up being cheaper over 7 to 8 years than driving a FREE gas car.
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neostylez3 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 4:34 am
Actually layer this with the Shoppers Drugmart promotion and it works out sensibly. See if you go to Esso regularly than this can be layered nicely. In itself, the math works as follows:

1) 1500 * 0.1 = $150 , this is 1500 litres times savings of $0.10 per litre, hence, savings. And...
2) 150 + 10 = $160, which is 1) from above plus the $10 giftcard they provide.

So, how does this stack up? Well, $135 is cash spent, and 160-135=25, so percentage wise this is 25/135=18.518518%=~ roughly 18.52% return. Which isn't bad, keep in mind though this represents 1500 in cash outlay roughly, since gas is $1.xx per litre. Compared to SDM, which has a 8% return rate not including bonus redemption factor.
So your saving $25, but is you total spending actually only $150?

Total spending is after the 1500 liters purchased, if you don’t purchase this gas done you’ve already lost $150, so what your saving should be $25/(1500l*$1.xx/l+$135)

With calculations likes that, the shoppers drug mart deal looks better if it is really 8%, what is the shoppers deal?
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IntrepidRT wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 9:17 am
With the Ontario $14k incentives? My Nissan Leaf S was basically the same price as a brand new similar mid-size gas car with the same features & same power (around $20k + tax). The new ones are a bit more money but come with a lot more technology. If you look at it with gas savings, the car is free after 7 years of driving 25,000km/year. The Leaf is among the best for value though, if you look at something like a Bolt, the value proposition decreases because of the 60kWh battery pack you have to pay for.


If you drive an average amount (20,000km+ per year), buying a brand new higher value EV like a Nissan Leaf, a Hyundai Ioniq Electric, a Kia Soul EV or a VW eGolf (with current Ontario incentives) WILL end up being cheaper over 7 to 8 years than driving a FREE gas car.
That’s pretty appeling if you are in the market for a brand new car (and can live with the limited driving range which I am sure most people can).

The thing is since there aren’t a lot of EV on the market, you don’t really have a choice to buy new or slightly used which in most case would mean spend « a lot » of money on a car, which isn’t everybody’s priority.

Basically my point is, if you have a paid car and you want to save money, don’t go to the dealer to buy an EV just to save on gas; it’ll take between 7 and 8 years for a return on your investment (assuming you keep the car after that and neglecting maintenance difference between used and new car).

Of course, that’s only from a money perspective neglecting environmental (and other) perspective(s) for exemple.
Last edited by max9505672 on Nov 9th, 2017 10:57 am, edited 2 times in total.
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McMaggot wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 7:19 pm
Are you using some sort of theoretical math here? I can't seem to get my head wrapped around it.
The calculation requires the actual spending which is the total cost of the 1500l of gas, the savings look good if you don’t need to buy the 1500l of gas
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IntrepidRT wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 12:20 pm
....or you can save 85% on fuel costs by switching to an electric car. Honestly, I drive 25,000km/year and we're buying our second EV now (the Ontario $14k incentive is a large factor but even without it you'd save money), you'll never regret switching. I spend less than $500 per year on Ontario hydro to run my EV. My car (Leaf) ends up being free when factoring in 7 years of fuel savings - I'm half way there already.

Anyone who lives in Ontario, Quebec or B.C. who doesn't do the math on EV ownership is doing themselves (and their wallets) a disservice.

I got tired of the games the fuel companies play with their pricing, it's not like the average person doesn't have the option to give them the middle finger. I have a friend who doesn't even have a place to plug in at his apartment, fully dependent on public charging who has spent $41 to drive 38,000km in 6 months of owning his Bolt (he's obviously a bit crazy, but he's proof that it can be done even without access to a plug at home by buying a long range EV like the Bolt).
I'm thinking of making my next car electric. Just wondering how it's held up for you during the winter months.

Does it lose any performance or mileage range?
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max9505672 wrote:
Nov 9th, 2017 10:57 am
That’s pretty appeling if you are in the market for a brand new car (and can live with the limited driving range which I am sure most people can).

The thing is since there aren’t a lot of EV on the market, you don’t really have a choice to buy new or slightly used which in most case would mean spend « a lot » of money on a car, which isn’t everybody’s priority.

Basically my point is, if you have a paid car and you want to save money, don’t go to the dealer to buy an EV just to save on gas; it’ll take between 7 and 8 years for a return on your investment (assuming you keep the car after that and neglecting maintenance difference between used and new car).

Of course, that’s only from a money perspective neglecting environmental (and other) perspective(s) for exemple.
Either spend a lot of money on a brand new car which ALSO requires virtually no maintenance or spend a lot of money on gasoline and maintenance on a used car and be behind after less than 5 years. Used EV's (in Ontario at least) are generally terrible deals as well unless you import from the USA.

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