Fashion & Beauty

watch lovers....what's your favorite watch?

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Jan 23, 2007
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Thanks! I love the clean, simple classic look. I’ll be checking it out and may put it on my Christmas list this year. It will hubby happy, not much to think about for him.
mr_raider wrote:
Sep 26th, 2018 9:42 pm
Have you considered Seiko's solar line for a daily wear watch? Something like this?

https://www.amazon.ca/Seiko-Womens-SUT2 ... omen+watch


Bought a seiko solar for my wife and got a decent discount on it from a dealer.
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Shaynelle wrote:
Oct 5th, 2018 6:44 pm
Thanks! I love the clean, simple classic look. I’ll be checking it out and may put it on my Christmas list this year. It will hubby happy, not much to think about for him.
For him?

Another seiko Face With Tears Of Joy

Image
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Apr 30, 2003
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appleb wrote:
Oct 4th, 2018 10:04 am
Getting tax free + 10% off is about right for an AD. If you're looking at Hamilton field watches, then I'd also check out the 2018 No-date Khaki Field. That's one that I'd go for.
Ill think about that one, its mechanical though.

Havent decided to go 38 or 42. 38 seems a bit small.

As a side note about Grand Seiko talk, Grand Seiko of America has been created.

https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/grand ... wn-company

Probabbly means easier access to grand seikos and repairs done within North America.
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PCDawg wrote:
Oct 6th, 2018 10:26 am
Ill think about that one, its mechanical though.

Havent decided to go 38 or 42. 38 seems a bit small.

As a side note about Grand Seiko talk, Grand Seiko of America has been created.

https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/grand ... wn-company

Probabbly means easier access to grand seikos and repairs done within North America.
When I sent in my SBGA011 snowflake in Februrary 2018 for repair, i brought it to the AD and they sent it to Seiko Canada who then sent it to Seiko Japan. The turnaround was estimated to be 2 months. Although there was an issue where Seiko Canada had to send it back to Japan again, so it actually turned into 4 months.
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Everytime I see a picture posted of Grand Seikos on the net I feel somewhat meh about them but then when I see them in person I get seriously excited. I wonder why they tend to not photograph as well as other watches. Really tempted to pull the trigger on one but the thickness is putting me off. Are there any models that are somewhat slimmer? I find the thickness of a 36mm Datejust to be perfect for my wrist.
I take pictures of stuff ; flickr
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superock wrote:
Oct 7th, 2018 4:41 am
Everytime I see a picture posted of Grand Seikos on the net I feel somewhat meh about them but then when I see them in person I get seriously excited. I wonder why they tend to not photograph as well as other watches. Really tempted to pull the trigger on one but the thickness is putting me off. Are there any models that are somewhat slimmer? I find the thickness of a 36mm Datejust to be perfect for my wrist.
The quartz models are the thinnest.

After that come the regular beat models with no complications (the 9s65) and spring drive models without GMT.

Anything high beat, high beat GMT or spring drive gMt will be thick.

But you should try them on. My Seiko GMT (9s66) is listed at 13.7mm, but it sits quite well on the wrist. It depends a lot on the lug shape. I find the 44GS cases tend to be a bit straight and sit poorly.
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appleb wrote:
Oct 6th, 2018 11:34 am
When I sent in my SBGA011 snowflake in Februrary 2018 for repair, i brought it to the AD and they sent it to Seiko Canada who then sent it to Seiko Japan. The turnaround was estimated to be 2 months. Although there was an issue where Seiko Canada had to send it back to Japan again, so it actually turned into 4 months.
How often do they need to be serviced? I had a Rolex for 16 years and never serviced it. Ran +2 a day during the entire time.
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najibs wrote:
Oct 10th, 2018 3:41 pm
How often do they need to be serviced? I had a Rolex for 16 years and never serviced it. Ran +2 a day during the entire time.
Seiko says every 3-4 years. Considering spring drive has less moving parts than automatics, most people think that's overly exaggerated.
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I have a feeling that this Christmas season, the Series 4 Apple Watch will be taking a LOT of sales away from traditional Swiss and Japanese watch sales. THey already have been, but with Series 4 being as good as it is, it will be a huge blow to the watch industry.
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Jan 5, 2003
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najibs wrote:
Oct 11th, 2018 12:47 pm
I have a feeling that this Christmas season, the Series 4 Apple Watch will be taking a LOT of sales away from traditional Swiss and Japanese watch sales. THey already have been, but with Series 4 being as good as it is, it will be a huge blow to the watch industry.
Agreed. To my own surprise, the Series 4 bumped all my mechanical pieces off my wrist. I wore the Sub to work today and then realized with horror that I couldn't wait to get home and put the damn Series 4 on. I won't be selling them all but a few will probably end up looking for new homes. Sad but it's the way of life. I can only imagine how tough it will be for the traditional watch industry to compete as tech gets sleeker and more useful. Arthur C. Clarke said it best - "any sufficiently developed technology is indistinguishable from magic". We're still a long ways off but that's where all this ubiquitous/wearable computing and later on AR-assisted stuff is heading...
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Jan 31, 2018
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Winnipeg
Meh. Every time there is a big new smart watch announcement, it reinforces that I am not interested in paying $500 for a remote control for my $1000 phone every 2-3 years.

Indeed, it has sparked me to recently buy my first mechanical watch, a Seiko SRPB41 (cocktail-time-lite in blue). It is a gorgeous 'thing' that I will keep and be proud of FAR beyond the lifespan of an Apple watch, for less money.
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Jan 5, 2003
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Good points, no doubt. The planned obsolescence is particularly the one that drives me nuts. But the fundamental issue here is that Apple Watch (and to some degree, other smart watches) are not really watches, they are wearable computing devices that happen to occupy the same part of the human body where watches have been worn for the last hundred years or so. They are called watches because we haven't yet really figured out what these things are. Kinda like the smartphone of today is a lot of things, the "phone" part being almost a "nice to have" if you consider how we use them. The smart watch technology is still in its infancy, the limitations are many and the uses are few but these devices are already hugely more useful than even the most complicated watches. There will come a time when not wearing a smart watch will mean that you are missing out on something, and at some point in time they will be just as indispensable as smartphones are today.

But yeah, I don't see myself without at least half a dozen various mechanical pieces that I love to fondle and wear when I am in the mood. And, of course, there will still be the other functionality that no smart watch can really compete with - signalling one's wealth (or exquisite and discriminating taste, if you will) and generally serving as a means of self-aggrandizing. The big watch houses probably won't all go bankrupt overnight and even not in the foreseeable future, but the dumb watches are already confined to a very narrow utility niche. They happen to compete for the humans' wrists against something they can't possibly hope to match utility-wise. Oh, and as the demand wanes, the entire school of design, manufacture and servicing will deteriorate too, making the traditional watches even more expensive to design, make and maintain.

Smartwatches' doom will come too one day, who knows in what form, likely something that will feed visual info directly into the wearer's field of view. So their triumph may be short lived, probably even shorter than the century+ that the wristwatches lasted so far. But in the near future the smart watches are all set to win the struggle for our wrists and our money.
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mr_raider wrote:
Oct 11th, 2018 11:34 am
Seiko says every 3-4 years. Considering spring drive has less moving parts than automatics, most people think that's overly exaggerated.
Well the high beat mechanical watches they recommend servicing every 3 years, so this is slightly longer. But the watch has nearly the same number of moving parts as a regular mechanical watch does, and since it does use a mainspring, when the watch is wound and running there is torque on the wheel train and force on all the pivots, so the wear will be much higher than a regular quartz watch that only has force on the pivots for a very small fraction of each second. I would consider it the same as a mechanical watch in terms of the propensity for wear.

The spring drive is a less accurate, more maintenance intensive quartz watch. Add in the fact that there are very limited service options, and for me it's not something I would be interested in just to get a smoothly sweeping seconds hand. You can get that with a vintage tuning fork watch, or with the new Bulova watches.

Cheers, Al
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Igor01 wrote:
Oct 11th, 2018 7:03 pm
Agreed. To my own surprise, the Series 4 bumped all my mechanical pieces off my wrist. I wore the Sub to work today and then realized with horror that I couldn't wait to get home and put the damn Series 4 on. I won't be selling them all but a few will probably end up looking for new homes. Sad but it's the way of life. I can only imagine how tough it will be for the traditional watch industry to compete as tech gets sleeker and more useful. Arthur C. Clarke said it best - "any sufficiently developed technology is indistinguishable from magic". We're still a long ways off but that's where all this ubiquitous/wearable computing and later on AR-assisted stuff is heading...
I hate losing a day of data! lol
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ArcherWatches wrote:
Oct 12th, 2018 8:39 am
Well the high beat mechanical watches they recommend servicing every 3 years, so this is slightly longer. But the watch has nearly the same number of moving parts as a regular mechanical watch does, and since it does use a mainspring, when the watch is wound and running there is torque on the wheel train and force on all the pivots, so the wear will be much higher than a regular quartz watch that only has force on the pivots for a very small fraction of each second. I would consider it the same as a mechanical watch in terms of the propensity for wear.

The spring drive is a less accurate, more maintenance intensive quartz watch. Add in the fact that there are very limited service options, and for me it's not something I would be interested in just to get a smoothly sweeping seconds hand. You can get that with a vintage tuning fork watch, or with the new Bulova watches.

Cheers, Al
I believe they went to 4 years with hi beat also.

Personally I got a good old regular beat 9s66. Nothing fancy, but supposedly one of seikos most robust movements.

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