Home & Garden

Water heater venting pipe flaking

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 7th, 2017 12:46 pm
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2007
2967 posts
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Paris
The pipe in the walls should be a higher end double-walled pipe. I'd just go to a home store and buy the pipe you need and put it back together, then seal with tape. Your clothes gassing off moisture wont damage the pipe like that. As someone said above, the acidity coupled with possibly a cheap pipe did this in. I'd check your cap outside as well.
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 21, 2017
105 posts
9 upvotes
Jerico wrote:
Nov 26th, 2017 12:51 pm
Your clothes gassing off moisture wont damage the pipe like that. As someone said above, the acidity coupled with possibly a cheap pipe did this in. I'd check your cap outside as well.
Not necessary gassing off moisture but would the wet clothes create a more humid environment to cause the flue gas to be not hot enough to naturally flow out of the flue to the outside?

Is the cap that's outside on the side of the house or top of the house?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 21, 2017
105 posts
9 upvotes
rcmpvet wrote:
Nov 26th, 2017 10:39 am
You should also check that CO detector and probably replace it. That alone should have been alerting you to the danger.
I believe the house carbon monoxide detector does not go off until it detects CO at dangerous levels.
Carbon Monoxide Concentrations: Table (AEN-172)
https://www.abe.iastate.edu/extension-a ... e-aen-172/
I just bought a new CO detector and placed it in the enclosed space where the furnace is and it's not even registering a reading. The CO detector will only register a reading if it is a minimum of 11 PPM.
Deal Addict
Oct 13, 2014
1019 posts
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Somewhere, ON
^^^^^ I know of the parameters for detection, I was just pointing this out as i found it hard to believe that it would not go off due to proximity and the size of that hole, which could disperse CO into that room. Glad you had it checked.
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Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
2874 posts
549 upvotes
Ottawa
Ohmare_Q wrote:
Nov 26th, 2017 2:00 am
Ok. The section going from the hot water tank to the furnace needs to be replaced. You can DIY but if you're not comfortable make sure to tape that vent up asap and call a professional. Right now you're venting in to your house. Not good.
Yes, it's an easy DIY but that didn't just happen overnight which would suggest that you've not had the furnace serviced for a long time. I would suggest you take the opportunity to have everything checked out at the same time by a licensed professional.
Sr. Member
Nov 9, 2008
948 posts
171 upvotes
Toronto
This is extremely dangerous. You are venting the acidic gases and carbon monoxide from both your hot water tank and furnace directly into your home. Do not operate your hot water tank or furnace until you have this fixed. Judging by your questions, I would highly suggest you call a professional immediately to address this. Have them investigate to ensure no deterioration of the piping in wall - not sure if it is direct venting through side of your home or going up a chimney. Assuming chimney, this would be more prone to damage due to moist environment and potential leaks from the chimney/vent cap.

Just to stress again - please don't take this lightly This is very dangerous - you are putting yourself and your family's life at risk by not addressing this. This is not something you want to pinch pennies over - pay the money and have it fixed immediately.
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
3414 posts
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Toronto
jacquesstrap wrote:
Nov 27th, 2017 9:54 am
Just to stress again - please don't take this lightly This is very dangerous - you are putting yourself and your family's life at risk by not addressing this. This is not something you want to pinch pennies over - pay the money and have it fixed immediately.
+1

You shouldn't be speculating on causes and reading responses on RFD and instead get this fixed ASAP! The problem is that good HVAC people are all busy replacing furnaces right now and won't bother coming out for a job this small. Therefore, you should repair it yourself (easy job with a length of pipe, one elbow, tin snips and foil tape) or hire a handyperson (shouldn't charge more than an hour of labour, and really only takes a lot less than that), while getting a qualified HVAC person to come out in the future to figure out the cause.

If you can't completely repair it yourself or get a handyperson to come out immediately, then at least foil tape like crazy over the opening (as a temporary patch) until the handyperson can come tomorrow.

Don't leave that opening unpatched while relying on your carbon monoxide detector!
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
25869 posts
2877 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
jm1 wrote:
Nov 27th, 2017 5:56 pm
If you can't completely repair it yourself or get a handyperson to come out immediately, then at least foil tape like crazy over the opening (as a temporary patch) until the handyperson can come tomorrow.
Foil tape will not do a thing for that situation. It has to be replaced immediately. Period.
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Jan 6, 2002
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Gee wrote:
Nov 28th, 2017 1:56 am
Foil tape will not do a thing for that situation. It has to be replaced immediately. Period.
Foil tape can contain the exhaust inside the tube, preventing it from escaping into the ambient house air and poisoning the OP. Yeah it's going to be sticking only to itself on the lower half of the pipe, but it will still seal it.
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Jr. Member
Feb 9, 2006
144 posts
33 upvotes
Can everyone stop giving ignorant "advice". Tape might work but it might also burn up and flake off and he's in the same situation. Tape might work and maybe so well in the temporary that he forgets to take care of it and get proper repairs. With gas appliances it is a "what if" scenario. What if the tape fails and what if his CO detectors aren't working as he thought they would and what if no one in that house wakes up in the morning....and no, this isn't exaggeration.
hoob wrote:
Nov 29th, 2017 6:10 pm
Foil tape can contain the exhaust inside the tube, preventing it from escaping into the ambient house air and poisoning the OP. Yeah it's going to be sticking only to itself on the lower half of the pipe, but it will still seal it.
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Jan 6, 2002
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Hexavalent wrote:
Nov 29th, 2017 10:03 pm
Can everyone stop giving ignorant "advice". Tape might work but it might also burn up and flake off and he's in the same situation. Tape might work and maybe so well in the temporary that he forgets to take care of it and get proper repairs. With gas appliances it is a "what if" scenario. What if the tape fails and what if his CO detectors aren't working as he thought they would and what if no one in that house wakes up in the morning....and no, this isn't exaggeration.
The proposal is, both literally and figuratively, a stop-gap solution that is highlighted as such.

The probability that OP performs the stop-gap solution and then "forgets" about it is lower than the probability that on a cold night or two before a professional can come in, they decide to run the furnace anyway. Hence, the stop-gap solution as advisable in lieu of doing nothing, or in lieu of doing the right thing but in a few days.
I've got a pretty good friend who's seen me at my worst.
He don't care if I'm a blessing or a curse,
But he always shows up when the chips are down.
That's the kind of friend I like to be around.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
25869 posts
2877 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
hoob wrote:
Nov 30th, 2017 11:57 pm
The proposal is, both literally and figuratively, a stop-gap solution that is highlighted as such.
There is no stop gap. There is only a solution. Repair it correctly the first time so you don't need to do it later

If he has to go to Home Depot to buy the tape, he could just as easily move down the isle and buy the proper duct work and replace it.
Sr. Member
May 11, 2009
504 posts
124 upvotes
Gee wrote:
Dec 1st, 2017 1:38 am
There is no stop gap. There is only a solution. Repair it correctly the first time so you don't need to do it later

If he has to go to Home Depot to buy the tape, he could just as easily move down the isle and buy the proper duct work and replace it.
The man didn't know what the duct was for or what was venting through it. How likely is it that he will be able to carry out the repair himself? I recommended tape only as a temporary measure for that evening. I always recommended that he call an expert asap.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2015
2631 posts
474 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
Ideally get professionally repaired.

Until that time others have suggested solutions UNTIL can get done properly QUICKLY.

For the straight portion... If not able to put in new metal yourself... would it be possible to to get larger diameter metal and put over and then just use metal foil tape to seal.

AGAIN, until can properly repair.
Sr. Member
Nov 9, 2008
948 posts
171 upvotes
Toronto
Can we hear from OP on this? Did you end up addressing this? Hope you are still alive and kicking...

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