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Water leaks in basement

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  • Feb 10th, 2020 11:40 am
[OP]
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Dec 9, 2005
3438 posts
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Ontario

Water leaks in basement

I'm looking to control the water that leaks into the basement. Due to various reasons, waterproofing from the outside is not practical.

The solution I'm looking at is a perimeter channel system that doesn't require me to be using a jackhammer. I mean, I could do that but it's down the list of things I want to do.

Anyway, I'm looking for something like this https://waterproof.com/sealonce-diy-bas ... ng-system/ . It's not the ultimate solution, but it's what will probably work best for me.

If anyone knows where I can get that sort of thing in Canada, it would be appreciated.

Thanks.
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12 replies
Deal Fanatic
Jun 11, 2005
8373 posts
2238 upvotes
Mississauga
TCWeasel wrote: I'm looking to control the water that leaks into the basement. Due to various reasons, waterproofing from the outside is not practical.

The solution I'm looking at is a perimeter channel system that doesn't require me to be using a jackhammer. I mean, I could do that but it's down the list of things I want to do.

Anyway, I'm looking for something like this https://waterproof.com/sealonce-diy-bas ... ng-system/ . It's not the ultimate solution, but it's what will probably work best for me.

If anyone knows where I can get that sort of thing in Canada, it would be appreciated.

Thanks.
I dont have any company recommendations but make sure you do it right. If you try to save money it might come back to bite you when you come to sell.
Deal Guru
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Oct 6, 2010
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Toronto
Product looks like garbage. If that is what you really want, you could probably use them plastic cable trays that hide cable for wall mounted tvs. Same concept. Is the basement finished? I have a leak and like yourself, exterior waterproofing isn't really an option. I looked at a multitude of options but in the end, I used a dimple membrane and left enough gap for water to flow underneath since it isn't running down the wall and installed a floor. Hard to provide you with options with not much detail.
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Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
11051 posts
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Brampton
I don't understand how the product in the OP works to keep water out. Any water coming thru the basement wall is going to be able to go above it and then where does the water drain to? Also the pressure from the water can easily lift the adhesive if it has no place to relieve it.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
2349 posts
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Toronto
The solution the OP posted is for water management, not prevention, as they indicated. They know it's not ideal, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

Those systems simply contain the water and direct to a sump pit or floor drain. Other similar systems include a dimpled plastic membrane on the walls, trenching the basement floor around the perimeter, installing interior weeping tiles and controlling the water that way. Basically identical to waterproofing on the outside, just on the interior.

I had a similar issue with a house out in the country back in the 90's. It was my first house, we were just starting out and it was a 1200 sq ft bungalow. 30 x 40 is a lot of excavation and waterproofing. We had an unfinished basement and got water infiltration a couple of times a year. I corrected grading etc. but nothing helped. I couldn't spend $20K or whatever on excavating the foundation and waterproofing, so I dealt with it the way I could.

I rented a concrete saw, cut a hole in the basement floor at the outside wall, dug down and out as far as I could in either direction under the slab (by hand - maybe a couple of feet) and put weeping tile / sump pit in. Pumped up and out of the house away from the foundation.

This didn't solve the problem, but it gave me a convenient place to squeegee water to for evacuation.

Sold the house a few years later, and forced my agent to disclose occasional water issues in the basement. They didn't want to include it.

We got lucky on the timing - open house, the basement was dry. Sold the house on the first day - had an offer over asking, NO CONDITIONS (no inspection) before I got to the office that morning. Accepted later that afternoon. Water in the basement the next morning.

In my case, even if I had the money, the waterproofing would have been a wasted investment. I was lucky - no question, and if we wanted to stay longer, we would have waterproofed from the exterior, as the basement had 8+ foot ceilings, tall above grade windows and would have doubled our living space. Would have easily been worthwhile, but we knew we weren't staying for more than 5 years or so.
Member
Jul 19, 2007
383 posts
71 upvotes
Markham
Have a similar situation as OP in my basement, and I guess the best part is I am in the middle of framing and have a chance to fix it before finishing the basement. The bad part is I have to delay my basement framing on those walls until this leak is fixed.
This water issue just popped up this year after 12 years, makes me think the grading might have changed on the side of the house, So will visit the outside solution once weather gets warmer.
I see an obvious crack on one wall and may try fixing from inside. Either way I will install styrofoam insulation boards on exterior walls and cover the floor with some water proof membrane.
Does anyone have estimate on how much water proof from outer perimeter costs on two spots covering around 5 meters length? I also see some ideas to divert the water away from foundation by redirecting the evestrough down spout by using an extension.

OP please keep us posted on your solution as I will follow and see if it suits me in my situation as well. Thanks
Jr. Member
Apr 13, 2016
158 posts
27 upvotes
My sister had the same problem. Hired a company to come and break the cement floor about 6 to 8 inches from the wall.
They did this on 2 complete basement walls. put like a gutter type thing to catch the water and angled it to go right into her sump pump.
Works well but cost her like 5 thousand.
I had never heard of this.
If you want more info, I can ask her for the company name/website etc.
Member
Dec 9, 2013
427 posts
293 upvotes
Toronto
I was in the same boat as you, and tried the cheap solution by preventing water from entering where the house meets the concrete/driveway/landscaping by caulking it and I even tried painting the concrete blocks from the inside with paint designed to hold back water pressure. None will work.

My basement foundation wall is concrete blocks and they aren't waterproof (especially at the mortar joints). The only solution for me was to waterproof it from the exterior (digging a trench all around, and applying a dimple membrane) and it kept my basement dry as I finished it.
Member
Aug 23, 2014
237 posts
87 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
resan wrote: Have a similar situation as OP in my basement, and I guess the best part is I am in the middle of framing and have a chance to fix it before finishing the basement. The bad part is I have to delay my basement framing on those walls until this leak is fixed.
This water issue just popped up this year after 12 years, makes me think the grading might have changed on the side of the house, So will visit the outside solution once weather gets warmer.
I see an obvious crack on one wall and may try fixing from inside. Either way I will install styrofoam insulation boards on exterior walls and cover the floor with some water proof membrane.
Does anyone have estimate on how much water proof from outer perimeter costs on two spots covering around 5 meters length? I also see some ideas to divert the water away from foundation by redirecting the evestrough down spout by using an extension.

OP please keep us posted on your solution as I will follow and see if it suits me in my situation as well. Thanks
Had mine done by RCC couple of years ago, 10 feet long, about $2k. Following year I saw water again in the same spot after it rained for a long time. It turns out the water was entering through the basement window. I have a partially finished basement so I couldn’t tell where the water was coming from.
[OP]
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Dec 9, 2005
3438 posts
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Ontario
koffey wrote: Product looks like garbage. If that is what you really want, you could probably use them plastic cable trays that hide cable for wall mounted tvs. Same concept. Is the basement finished? I have a leak and like yourself, exterior waterproofing isn't really an option. I looked at a multitude of options but in the end, I used a dimple membrane and left enough gap for water to flow underneath since it isn't running down the wall and installed a floor. Hard to provide you with options with not much detail.
The basement isn't finished, but it is framed. I could go with an interior french drain, but I fear my ability to use a jackhammer without making this worse. The would be the best solution with not escavating. I will do as much outside as possible to mitigate the water from entering (such as backfilling). I suspect some of the water is coming up from underneath, so that further complicates external work, along with a wrap-around porch. It appears omre and more that the french drain is going to the best, but not easiest, solution.

I do have some Delta for the floor, but wanted to better control where the water goes so that it didn't pool

The basement is also two levels, about a foot difference. The house was built in place of an older home, so the older basement remains while the expanding the footprint of the home. This allowed it to be built as a renovation instead of new build.
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Oct 6, 2010
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TCWeasel wrote: The basement isn't finished, but it is framed. I could go with an interior french drain, but I fear my ability to use a jackhammer without making this worse. The would be the best solution with not escavating. I will do as much outside as possible to mitigate the water from entering (such as backfilling). I suspect some of the water is coming up from underneath, so that further complicates external work, along with a wrap-around porch. It appears omre and more that the french drain is going to the best, but not easiest, solution.

I do have some Delta for the floor, but wanted to better control where the water goes so that it didn't pool

The basement is also two levels, about a foot difference. The house was built in place of an older home, so the older basement remains while the expanding the footprint of the home. This allowed it to be built as a renovation instead of new build.
If you have the space, at minimum 5-8" from the wall, I would rent a concrete saw and cut the floor slab on all exterior sides in that room, bonus if it's one, and install an interior weeping tile to sump pump. This is the only way to deal with hydrostatic leaks as it moves up onto the slab from underneath.

I was going to perform this in my basement, but the location of the furnace makes it impossible. Hence I went with a membrane interior.
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Jan 31, 2020
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Hi TC, I have a house in southwestern Ontario which had a water problem as well. The water was coming in on one wall where the cinder block wall joins the concrete floor. The sump pump had drains underneath the floor which extend around the foundation about 3 feet inside the wall and is not connected to the outside of the foundation. It doesn't get much water at all. Anyways I know people who own a house in downtown Toronto, (which is more or less impossible to do an exterior foundation dig) and they did an interior drain which convinced me to try this. I cut a trench on one wall and found a weeping tile under the corner of the foundation which was putting a fair bit of water out. It was 5 inch ID and was completely filled with clay so the water was pooling under the house. I put a sump pit where this weeping tile is and I haven't had water since.
I used a jackhammer which I bought online for around $250 and a craftsman 7-1/4 saw. The saw cut well but isn't designed for this type of work. I went through 2 of them and got them replaced free. Canadian tire has good diamond blades which go on sale a lot for $20. I think a better choice would be the concrete saw which takes a 10 inch blade and is around $325. Its hard work but very doable for a homeowner who wants to save $$. The total cost was around $600 including sump pit and pump. I still plan to do more grading and put a swale in to reduce water pressure.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
2349 posts
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Toronto
Just don't rent a gas powered concrete saw and use it in your basement. I won't say how I know, but it tends to lead to backing out of your driveway in your truck and taking the side of a friend's car off ;)

I was young and stupid once. Now I'm old, and perhaps less stupid.

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