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Water softener has not been using salt lately

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 25th, 2017 9:19 am
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Dec 12, 2009
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Gee wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 8:05 am
You should be able to replace it yourself. It is just two pipes. One intake and one out. The only concern is the length.

You got 10 good years out of it. It's time to replace it. I would consider a better unit like the Kinetico which you can find at Costco.

The dealer that installed my unit is offering a slightly used unit for $2800 installed with the balance of the remaining warranty.
Is that how much a replacement unit costs these days. I spent less than half this amount 10 years ago for a Culligan which I thought to be over priced. A friend was am agent, so it was more or less a favor. So far the only thing that is not working is the panel light which is totally unnecessary. I hope I never have to replace it.
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Aug 2, 2004
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will888 wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 1:16 pm
Is that how much a replacement unit costs these days. I spent less than half this amount 10 years ago for a Culligan which I thought to be over priced. A friend was am agent, so it was more or less a favor. So far the only thing that is not working is the panel light which is totally unnecessary. I hope I never have to replace it.
You can get cheap water softener for $1200 - $1400

A Culligan unit should set you back $2500 - $3000

A Kinetico unit will cost between $4000 - $7000

You got a good deal on the Culligan.
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Feb 8, 2014
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rdx wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 12:10 am
Another two months has passed, just an update. Salt at the same level and not wet at all. I guess the unit is definitely malfunctioning. Since it is almost 10 years old, I wonder if I should fix it at all.
I wonder if I should just replace it with the Costco unit. Do I need an installer to replace or I can simply reconnect it to the existing hoses

Thanks for any advice.
If you can't tell without checking then the water meets your needs, why do you need to fix it at all?
General Zod for Premier would have been less evil then the other guy
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Apr 17, 2016
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Wouldn't replacing the unit be pretty plug and play? If the previous one was copper sweated, couldn't you just cut it off, shark bite a flex hose on the inlet and outlet and re-ground?
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Quentin5 wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 5:43 pm
If you can't tell without checking then the water meets your needs, why do you need to fix it at all?
Most people don't know the difference or the benefits of soft water. As far as they're concerned, it just has to be wet.

But soft water will prevent lime scale in your shower glass and tile
Requires less soap when doing laundry
Will not clog your drains, pipes and shower heads with mineral deposits.
Reduce or eliminate sediment in your hot water tank.
Will not produce mineral flakes (white snow) when using a humidifier
Pots, pans and dishes etc
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Gee wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 5:57 pm
Most people don't know the difference or the benefits of soft water. As far as they're concerned, it just has to be wet.
True
But soft water will prevent lime scale in your shower glass and tile
It should
Requires less soap when doing laundry
How will you know how much less to use (and can you cut a pod)?
People have told me they save money, the salt plus extra water usage plus electricity will cost more then the soap savings
Will not clog your drains, pipes and shower heads with mineral deposits.

I don't think most drain clogs are from water minerals, but shower heads yes
Reduce or eliminate sediment in your hot water tank.

According to several manuals i read when researching hot water tanks they say it will rust the tank faster so you must change the anode more frequently or live with shorter life
Will not produce mineral flakes (white snow) when using a humidifier
Not sure on this, you would in theory get salt deposits instead of calcium/magnesium. This should be easier to remove mind you.

The OP had to check if its working instead of having problems, so i stand by my advice of if you don't have a problem why spend big bucks to fix it?
General Zod for Premier would have been less evil then the other guy
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Quentin5 wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 6:06 pm
How will you know how much less to use (and can you cut a pod)?
People have told me they save money, the salt plus extra water usage plus electricity will cost more then the soap savings

According to several manuals i read when researching hot water tanks they say it will rust the tank faster so you must change the anode more frequently or live with shorter life
Electricity use is minimal and salt is cheap. I have a Kinetico and it uses no electricity. As for how much soap to use? I don't know. It has to be trial and error. I would start with half the normal amount and either increase or decrease as needed.

I can see salt corroding the anode rod, but I much rather replace it every few years instead of draining my tank every few months.

Average price seems to be $20

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.42-i ... 50837.html

But it depends on who you ask

https://www.quora.com/Does-water-soften ... ter-heater
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Gee wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 6:18 pm
Electricity use is minimal and salt is cheap. I have a Kinetico and it uses no electricity. As for how much soap to use? I don't know. It has to be trial and error. I would start with half the normal amount and either increase or decrease as needed.

I can see salt corroding the anode rod, but I much rather replace it every few years instead of draining my tank every few months.

Average price seems to be $20

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.42-i ... 50837.html

But it depends on who you ask

https://www.quora.com/Does-water-soften ... ter-heater
I know of nobody that drains their water tank every few months. No one.
I also know few people who replace anodes, though i wish everyone did, would save money on tank life reductions and floods.
I trust science over bad opinions, water plus salt plus iron equals rust. Your car is a good example, paint chips/defects leads to water + salt hitting iron. Most older cars on Canadian roads bear evidence to this. But please feel free to test this yourself and report the results
General Zod for Premier would have been less evil then the other guy
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Aug 2, 2004
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Quentin5 wrote:
Aug 20th, 2017 6:27 pm
I know of nobody that drains their water tank every few months. No one.
I also know few people who replace anodes, though i wish everyone did, would save money on tank life reductions and floods.
I trust science over bad opinions, water plus salt plus iron equals rust. Your car is a good example, paint chips/defects leads to water + salt hitting iron. Most older cars on Canadian roads bear evidence to this. But please feel free to test this yourself and report the results
I'm not disagreeing with you. I agree that salt can cause more damage than calcium and magnesium to the anode.

But the benefits of soft water out weigh the negatives to my water heater.

People are not suppose to drain their water tanks. They are suppose to drain a few gallons or several litres of water every 6 months to reduce the sediment in the tank. If you have soft water, this is not required. I don't know anyone that changes their anode rod either. Doesn't mean that it should be neglected.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php? ... ter.41136/
[OP]
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Jun 7, 2005
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Just an update, after I cleaned up the entire brine tank and put a bag of new salt, nothing is happening for months. In facts, I just tried moving the salt inside, it is all dry. It means no water has been going in............ (as I assume it should be wet, right ?) I pulled tiny black hose going inside tank, I do see a few drops of water dripping out though. And I tried flushing the device connected to this hose inside the tank, the water went through everything. Thus, nothing is blocked. So, I am not sure what is not working. By the way, how does this process works. Does the main unit push water into the brine tank through this tiny hose and suck the water back it to make soft water ? I am trying to understand what went wrong and decide if I need to buy a new unit as a service call probably costs a couple of hundreds and they probably don't want to do trouble shooting and just tell me to get a new unit. Thanks
Last edited by rdx on Oct 7th, 2017 5:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Nov 19, 2004
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rdx wrote:
Oct 7th, 2017 5:31 pm
Just an update, after I cleaned up the entire brink tank and put a bag of new salt, nothing is happening for months. In facts, I just tried moving the salt inside, it is all dry. It means no water has been going in............ (as I assume it should be wet, right ?) I pulled tiny black hose going inside tank, I do see a few drops of water dripping out though. And I tried flushing the device connected to this hose inside the tank, the water went through everything. Thus, nothing is blocked. So, I am not sure what is not working. By the way, how does this process works. Does the main unit push water into the brink tank through this tiny hose and suck the water back it to make soft water ? I am trying to understand what went wrong and decide if I need to buy a new unit as a service call probably costs a couple of hundreds and they probably don't want to do trouble shooting and just tell me to get a new unit. Thanks
Yes, the brine tank should have water in it. Basically the salt water is used during regeneration of the column. The water needs to be in the brine tank in order to solubility the salt.
[OP]
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Jun 7, 2005
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So water will be pumped inside the the brine tank and then go back into the water softener unit through the same hose ?
don242 wrote:
Oct 7th, 2017 9:14 pm
Yes, the brine tank should have water in it. Basically the salt water is used during regeneration of the column. The water needs to be in the brine tank in order to solubility the salt.
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rdx wrote:
Oct 7th, 2017 9:22 pm
So water will be pumped inside the the brine tank and then go back into the water softener unit through the same hose ?
Yes, that is how ours works. One hose only to the brine tank.
Sr. Member
Mar 19, 2013
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Prince Albert, Sask.
Please tell us the make and model of your softner. The water to make a brine is done in the brine refill cycle of the softner's regeneration. My salt dosage is about 6lbs. One gallon of water dissolve 3lbs. of salt. I want 2 to 3 gallons of water in the tank. Sounds like your brine (salt) tank is dry. Add some clean water to make a salt brine.
[OP]
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Jun 7, 2005
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I bought it from a company called Aqua Technologies in Markham, and the model is ATI-Pure Performance Series SF-3000 which is similar to the one on the link below but mine is an old model without digital display. I guess it is probably a unit assembled by this company.

By the way, is the water supposed to go into the brink tank itself through that hose ? Or we are supposed to put water in to start ? It took me hours to break the salt bridge and clean up the whole brink tank of "slush" before putting in a brand new bag of salt in there.

http://atipure.com/store/?product=ati-p ... onditioner
Magoo61 wrote:
Oct 8th, 2017 10:01 pm
Please tell us the make and model of your softner. The water to make a brine is done in the brine refill cycle of the softner's regeneration. My salt dosage is about 6lbs. One gallon of water dissolve 3lbs. of salt. I want 2 to 3 gallons of water in the tank. Sounds like your brine (salt) tank is dry. Add some clean water to make a salt brine.

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