Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Website DIY builder.. Which is best?

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 19th, 2018 4:37 pm
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Deal Addict
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Nov 27, 2005
1206 posts
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popbottle wrote:
Sep 9th, 2015 3:31 pm
Which other company has a $2/mo plan for the first year then?
There is free hosting out there if he wants as well.

From my experience with godaddy they really dropped the ball with me on their e-mail servers. I called them about 10 times because of emails that weren't going through. I found out through a google search that godaddy servers for no reason at all reject all google server e-mails.
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Jan 9, 2002
2313 posts
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Burlington
djpr wrote:
Sep 9th, 2015 3:38 pm
There is free hosting out there if he wants as well.

From my experience with godaddy they really dropped the ball with me on their e-mail servers. I called them about 10 times because of emails that weren't going through. I found out through a google search that godaddy servers for no reason at all reject all google server e-mails.
+1 -godaddy
OP you need to provide a little more info on what type of site you're looking to host. Is it a basket weaving blog or an online art store?
Newbie
Sep 23, 2015
5 posts
Toronto, ON
Free hosting? Is this still available? Where can I find the link please? Image
Deal Addict
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Feb 28, 2005
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Montreal
In order of cost (high to low) and effort (low to high):
  • hire agency to make site
  • hire designer/coder to make site
  • DIY Squarespace
  • DIY: get hosting, find Wordpress theme, install Wordpress
  • DIY: Wix, and then suffer with issues (mobile responsiveness, SSL, etc)
Koodo & Tangerine customer since 2006
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
7 posts
If you want to be taken seriously, don't go with Wix.

GoDaddy is fine, not sure why everyone complains about them. I was with them for a few years and it was fine. Only reason I switched is because at the time they wanted to charge extra for IMAP email. I'm not sure if that is still the case.

I'm currently with 1and1.ca and for the most part they have been good.

Just be careful with some of the US-based hosting services because their pricing is in USD not CAD.

Once you get the host, just install WordPress, it's pretty idiot-proof.
Deal Fanatic
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May 12, 2004
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Ottawa
sunnyb wrote:
Apr 27th, 2017 10:10 am
Holy OLD thread revival.
How else are spammers going shove spam links down our throats?

98% of 1+ year bumps have the sole purpose of posting a spam link.
Censorship is telling a man he can't have a steak just because a baby can't chew it.
- Mark Twain
Newbie
Aug 29, 2011
6 posts
3 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
marc_t wrote:
Apr 21st, 2017 11:37 am
In order of cost (high to low) and effort (low to high):
  • hire agency to make site
  • hire designer/coder to make site
  • DIY Squarespace
  • DIY: get hosting, find Wordpress theme, install Wordpress
  • DIY: Wix, and then suffer with issues (mobile responsiveness, SSL, etc)
You resurrected this thread after 2 years
Newbie
Jan 30, 2018
6 posts
1 upvote
When it comes to building websites, I prefer Wix and Weebly. While Weebly is certainly a good website builder: easy to use, good costumer support etc., I found more cool looking templates at Wix. These both website builders are user-friendly and intuitive to use. You can read this review to decide on a particular website builder http://www.webbuildersguide.com/free-website-builders/ . Pretty informative resource:)
Jr. Member
Apr 29, 2017
147 posts
34 upvotes
Squarespace is great if you know nothing about building a website, have also heard they are good SEO wise compared to other DIY companies. My site is doing great after a year
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
6285 posts
2286 upvotes
Toronto
all of the website builders I've tried to use are not good and intuitive like back in the day.

I remember making a basic HTML page back in the day with nice drop down menus was super easy with most of the hosting providers free web site builders. Even dreamweaver was essentially drag and drop, super easy HTML.

now dreamweaver is the most complex thing i've ever used and gone are the days of an efficient drag a drop system. u basically need to have some decent level of web coding experience to get anything good going.

i tried hostgator free builder.
i tried wordpress.. but the free templates are too restrictive and difficult to manage.

and then the amount of time u need to spend to make something work on wordpress, or wix, or whatever... u might as well learn some basic programming and copy code of internet to get what u want.

Unless of course youre building a complex sale website.. probably better off just going to shopify so u can get a Cart and checkout right off the bat with no issues.
Deal Addict
Jul 18, 2016
1901 posts
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daivey wrote:
Feb 12th, 2018 10:39 pm
all of the website builders I've tried to use are not good and intuitive like back in the day.

I remember making a basic HTML page back in the day with nice drop down menus was super easy with most of the hosting providers free web site builders. Even dreamweaver was essentially drag and drop, super easy HTML.

now dreamweaver is the most complex thing i've ever used and gone are the days of an efficient drag a drop system. u basically need to have some decent level of web coding experience to get anything good going.

i tried hostgator free builder.
i tried wordpress.. but the free templates are too restrictive and difficult to manage.

and then the amount of time u need to spend to make something work on wordpress, or wix, or whatever... u might as well learn some basic programming and copy code of internet to get what u want.

Unless of course youre building a complex sale website.. probably better off just going to shopify so u can get a Cart and checkout right off the bat with no issues.
I totally agree with this, but then again it really depends on your needs. I fought with all of the available website builders to try and come up with a solution for my business, looked at the cost to hire somebody, and finally threw my hands in the air and said: I'm going to learn how to do this from scratch. Of course, I had a past background in computer programming however not for website design. I even considered using Shopify, but their system is also limiting and didn't allow the product quantity, product type, and location based product restrictions I needed to implement.

In the end it was 7 months of hard work, but I build my own "complex sale" website. Great experience, actually. I learned a lot, and don't regret the time I spent doing it.

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