Computers & Electronics

What is the best (most reliable) router?

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[OP]
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Jun 30, 2005
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What is the best (most reliable) router?

My D-link DI-614+ is giving me too many disconnects lately. It works for like 15 seconds if I restart it (by unplugging the power) and then it's no longer connected until I restart it again (even though it says connected under status). Oh and I'm using it through its ethernet ports, not even wirelessly.

So I have decided to get a new router, hopefully something under $60. Yes I need something wireless, I can live with 802.11g. The most important thing is for it to be able to connect to my modem reliably for years to come. The second most important thing is of course, the price.

Any suggestions?
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Dec 10, 2007
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linksys. I have had great success with them with both cable and dsl connections.
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Feb 21, 2006
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knoxvle wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 12:23 am
linksys. I have had great success with them with both cable and dsl connections.
Keeping in mind that Linksys sells something like 15 different consumer router models currently (not counting older ones still for sale, and not counting pro models), and that the different models use different chipsets (e.g., Broadcom vs. Atheros) with different firmware, it's not really possible to make a blanket recommendation by brand name.

The older Linksys WRT-54G models with the Broadcom chipset supported by DD-WRT and Tomato firmware at least have the advantage of giving you 3 chances to find a version that works reliably in your situation (counting the original Linksys firmware and the two main options).
[OP]
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Aske001 wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 2:27 am
Keeping in mind that Linksys sells something like 15 different consumer router models currently (not counting older ones still for sale, and not counting pro models), and that the different models use different chipsets (e.g., Broadcom vs. Atheros) with different firmware, it's not really possible to make a blanket recommendation by brand name.

The older Linksys WRT-54G models with the Broadcom chipset supported by DD-WRT and Tomato firmware at least have the advantage of giving you 3 chances to find a version that works reliably in your situation (counting the original Linksys firmware and the two main options).
Thanks.

I was wondering if it was okay to buy their newer version, or go for the original (which happens to be more expensive). I think I saw someone mention somewhere that the updated version isn't as good as the original.
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Oct 31, 2007
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Canada
Gee wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 3:13 am
The one you want is the WRT54GL

The L stands for Linux, it will take the third party firmware
just got this one, night a day diff from my DI524.
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Jun 24, 2006
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Had a WRT54GL running for over 2 year on Tomato without a single drop.

Can't beat that. Unless you feel you "need" Wireless N speed, then the GL is still the one I recommend. I paid $40 for it but would have paid full price know what i know now.
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I have the WRT54G V2.2 which bought used from buy/sell forum here a few years ago...still working fine with Tomato firmware. Only swtiched to a cheap TP-Link to test and it is working fine too.
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Fernando Po
apvm wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 9:13 am
I have the WRT54G V2.2..still working fine with Tomato firmware.
Same.
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I get a 300 Mbps wireless connection with Very Good to Excellent signal strength throughout the house from my new-style Linksys WRT-400N (Atheros chipset), and it hasn't crashed or frozen on me yet. The actual throughout is still only about 60% of 100 Mbps wired ethernet, or about twice that of a good wireless G connection. Most of the new Linksys models use the Broadcom chipset though, so they would have only the "UFO-style" housing and antenna setup in common.

Or there's the D-Link DIR-655, which offers a gigabit ethernet switch and a built-in USB file/print server port for a very reasonable price. Good reputation for performance, but also frequent buggy firmware updates. No DD-WRT - they use an unsupported chipset.
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I've order the Linksys WRT54GL to replace my very old and noear dead Dlink Di-614+.

NowI understand from readings that I would be better off flashing with a third party firmware.
Anyone have a good link to a step-by-step?
I don't want to spend all my time managing the network... just a standard setup that will help keep the data moving.
Let's see...
4 PCs wired.
1 Mac wired
1 PC wireless
1 Netbook wireless
1 PS3 wired
1 Nintendo Wii wireless
1 Xbox 360 wired
1 Sony PSP wireless
Hmmm... I wonder if the kitchen sink is wifi enabled?

Thank you in advance.

Oh, I bought it at Newegg.ca (link)
$59.98 + tax, free shipping.

Mike
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MMMMMike wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 11:32 am
NowI understand from readings that I would be better off flashing with a third party firmware.
I don't want to spend all my time managing the network... just a standard setup that will help keep the data moving.
:lol:

Why would you want to mess around with third-party firmware when you just want to keep things simple?

Firmware options like DD-WRT or Tomato are good for:
- Last resort alternative when the stock firmware is giving you too many problems
- Messing around with complicated detail settings and diagnostics if you are keenly interested and you have lots of time on your hands.
- Adding optional capabilities that not too many people need (e.g., OpenVPN support on the router).
- Increasing the radio power beyond that legally allowed, if you don't give a fig about your neighbours (in which case I hope you live next to lots of other people just like yourself!)
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Aske001 wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 12:18 pm
:lol:

Why would you want to mess around with third-party firmware when you just want to keep things simple?

Firmware options like DD-WRT or Tomato are good for:
- Last resort alternative when the stock firmware is giving you too many problems
- Messing around with complicated detail settings and diagnostics if you are keenly interested and you have lots of time on your hands.
- Adding optional capabilities that not too many people need (e.g., OpenVPN support on the router).
- Increasing the radio power beyond that legally allowed, if you don't give a fig about your neighbours (in which case I hope you live next to lots of other people just like yourself!)
Okie dokie... if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
I'm cool with that.
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MMMMMike wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 11:32 am
I don't want to spend all my time managing the network... just a standard setup that will help keep the data moving.
Let's see...
4 PCs wired.
1 Mac wired
1 PC wireless
1 Netbook wireless
1 PS3 wired
1 Nintendo Wii wireless
1 Xbox 360 wired
1 Sony PSP wireless
Hmmm... I wonder if the kitchen sink is wifi enabled?
Once you get the WRT54G setup with DDWRT or OpenWRT or Tomato to your liking you won't have to touch it unless a firmware update is needed for security as the stability is rock solid.
MMMMMike wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 11:32 am
Oh, I bought it at Newegg.ca (link)
$59.98 + tax, free shipping.
Thanks. I might order from them as they are $10 cheaper than Tiger Direct and Canada Computers but then you have the hassles of UPS pickup when I'm not home, etc Maybe see if TD will match the price.

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