Computers & Electronics

What is the best (most reliable) router?

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  • Sep 13th, 2017 10:56 pm
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Deal Addict
Dec 5, 2006
4150 posts
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Markham
Nyte wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 2:24 pm
It doesn't matter what your laptop is running. The router doesn't care :)
Got you,thanks!
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Oct 13, 2008
358 posts
26 upvotes
Calgary
The DIR655 is rock solid for me. Has been for over a year now. Plus the Gig Ports are great to have. Wireless is good enough for streaming most video to the Xbox, and LAN performance is definitely good with actual throughput being in the 920Mbps range. Wireless N performance is close to 80Mbps actual throughput. Wireless G tested at 27Mbps actual throughput.

I've used it while running multiple torrents to my server pc, streaming 1080HD video, surfing the net, and running my VPN to work at all once and it's stayed solid throughout.

I'd happily recommend it to anyone.
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Aug 2, 2004
24417 posts
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East Gwillimbury
Nyte wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 2:22 pm
I found none of them to be reliable, regardless of firmware. They all died horribly if you did anything beyond basic browsing. At the time, the only thing I found reliable was an actual computer serving as a router (there's also pro gear, but that costs way more).
I have a computer configured as a router. I personally would never use any consumer router

PC with FreeBSD for me.
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Aug 13, 2002
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Gee wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 8:57 pm
I have a computer configured as a router. I personally would never use any consumer router

PC with FreeBSD for me.
+1. I used to run m0n0wall before I moved. The current router I have is stable enough, so I never bothered building a new one. And as I mentioned before, it isn't even the weakest link for me right now, so not much point.
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Oct 13, 2008
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Calgary
Gee wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 8:57 pm
I have a computer configured as a router. I personally would never use any consumer router

PC with FreeBSD for me.
Personally, I think it's a waste of power and resources to dedicate a pc as a router, when there many small dedicated boxes that can do the job far cheaper and better than any PC & switch combination, without all the inherent vulnerabilities in software and hardware.

To pick up a PC, and a switch, you're probably looking at around $400, and for that level of cash, you might as well buy a Cisco 831. Unless you go and buy a supercheap PC and crap switch, then you're always going to have hardware problems with. Not to mention the ongoing cost in power/parts to maintain it, plus the investment in time to learn how to configure / support a freeBSD solution that won't be compromised in 10 seconds.

So, while that may work for you, it's not going to work for the rest of the world.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
I totally agree.

I paid a lot more for my setup. I have a 3Com 24 port layer 3 Switch and a D-Link 24 port PoE switch

The computer cost over $1000

I don't just use it as a router. It is running a lot more applications. I have an Asterisk switch, NAS and every room in the house is wired.

No consumer router can handle the pounding I would give the router.

But that is just me.

BTW, all 48 ports are used.
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Jun 15, 2009
639 posts
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Aske001 wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2010 12:18 pm
:lol:
Why would you want to mess around with third-party firmware when you just want to keep things simple?
I've never had stock Linksys firmware that had all the options I wanted or even worked. They are notoriously bad with PPPoE and many open connections.
codetrap wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 9:43 pm
Personally, I think it's a waste of power and resources to dedicate a pc as a router, when there many small dedicated boxes that can do the job far cheaper and better than any PC & switch combination, without all the inherent vulnerabilities in software and hardware.

To pick up a PC, and a switch, you're probably looking at around $400, and for that level of cash, you might as well buy a Cisco 831. Unless you go and buy a supercheap PC and crap switch, then you're always going to have hardware problems with. Not to mention the ongoing cost in power/parts to maintain it, plus the investment in time to learn how to configure / support a freeBSD solution that won't be compromised in 10 seconds.

So, while that may work for you, it's not going to work for the rest of the world.
This may be true, but anybody with enough experience to run a PC as a router will undoubtedly have a few spare PCs just sitting around collecting dust or even running as a server.

I used to have an old P1-166MHz running my web server, ftp server, etc. I also used it for the PPPoE connection and as a router. The only reason I ended up getting WRT54G v3 and later DGL-4300 was because I needed wireless.

That BSD box was more secure then either of my routers, and if you want added security you can always go with OpenBSD. It also used much less resources then most routers use nowdays and served way more functions then any router I've ever seen does. However, first time around it did take me a few days to get PPPoE and routing all sorted out. Learning curve and all.
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Oct 13, 2008
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Calgary
censored wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 10:13 pm
I've never had stock Linksys firmware that had all the options I wanted or even worked. They are notoriously bad with PPPoE and many open connections.

This may be true, but anybody with enough experience to run a PC as a router will undoubtedly have a few spare PCs just sitting around collecting dust or even running as a server.
I can totally see your point too. I set up a lab here too running a couple different IOS's under a simulator (love that cisco contract ID from work). But, considering the OP's price point, and the fact that's he's asking this question indicates to me that he's not really the techie type with the prereq's to set up a firewall/router on a *nix box. I'm also familar with the crap stock linksys firmware, and immediately flashed the parent's to DD-WRT. But, even with that, the risk of bricking it is present, so in my opinion, it's still a better option to recommend something that works out of the box like the dir-655. It's pretty darn configurable for that price point, and it's easy to set up for the less technical.

It may not be the absolute best solution, but it's probably the best solution for him.
[OP]
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Jun 30, 2005
2082 posts
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Toronto
Perhaps links to said freeBSD router solution? I have a few computers lying around which I don't mind fixing up. I always love learning new things. Oh and you'd be only half-right about the techie type. I just happened to never dive into this part of things. I have a linux box running, but... I haven't decided what to do with it yet.

Also, I have already ordered the wrt54gl. Waiting on Newegg's shipping.
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Oct 6, 2005
15928 posts
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Gee wrote:
Jan 5th, 2010 8:57 pm
I have a computer configured as a router. I personally would never use any consumer router

PC with FreeBSD for me.
Overkill, waste of electricity, and too much maintenance for most people.

WRT54GL w/ Tomato is very solid, QoS on it is very good especially for VoIP.

If I wanted a more powerful router, I would get an embedded device like a Soekris w/ m0n0wall or similar.
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Oct 13, 2008
358 posts
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Calgary
IBOPM, I sit corrected. Just google for the FreeBSD. There are a lot of resources out there to help you learn.
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Jan 6, 2004
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Scarborough
I think FreeBSD is too much. Unless you're trying to protect something of high value, for most home or SMB i would go with WRT54G(L) and put tomato or DD-WRT.

I used DD-WRT for 2 years and has been great, then out of the sudden, my connection kept on dropping. I upgraded it to the latest version, worked for a week then it started again. I switched to Tomato and it's been working wonderfully.
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Aug 2, 2004
24417 posts
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East Gwillimbury
coolspot wrote:
Jan 6th, 2010 9:12 am
Overkill, waste of electricity, and too much maintenance for most people.

WRT54GL w/ Tomato is very solid, QoS on it is very good especially for VoIP.

If I wanted a more powerful router, I would get an embedded device like a Soekris w/ m0n0wall or similar.
MY first BSD Router was built in 1998, it ran till 2006 before I retired it. Never touched it.

Then I got more creative, my current router has been running for 3 years and it does require more maintenace, but it is minimal.

I reboot the router once a year. Not because I have to, but I just want to.

It is rock solid. Better than any consumer router. Of course it costs more, and it uses more electricity, but for what I get out of it, it is worth it.

I suggest you try pfsense if you want to get your feet wet. Get an Intel Atom board for $100 and a flash drive. Costs as much as a good router. Uses 60 Watts of electricity
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Aug 13, 2002
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coolspot wrote:
Jan 6th, 2010 9:12 am
Overkill, waste of electricity, and too much maintenance for most people.
Only a waste of electricity in the summer, even then, its minimal. As for maintenance, there really isn't any once it's setup.
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Jun 1, 2003
1853 posts
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Belleville
Just a followup.
I received the Linksys router, WRT54GL ($58.99 @ newegg w/free ship).
I quickly threw out the CD and instruction booklet... :cheesygri
All is well and working with the default software/flash.
I'll leave it like this until we have or see a reason to change.
The signal works well and can reach the laptop outside in the Cabana.

I was at Canada Computers today and noticed they have a boatload of them at the Ajax location @ $69.99.
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