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What do you do and how much do you make?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 13th, 2018 10:20 pm
Member
Feb 19, 2017
320 posts
136 upvotes
HelloWorld3 wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 4:58 pm
If you call senior leadership junior, than, call it whatever you want.

The market is very competitive; +125k seasoned controllers are competing for these +90k roles just to stay employed.
He's making 90K. I don't know how you would call that a senior leadership role.
Seasoned finance executives make 200+.
Deal Addict
Mar 27, 2004
2693 posts
316 upvotes
Toronto
Lets get back to what the OP is asking and why he is asking this..
why is everyone going on about being a controller.
Realtor - Platinum award winner
Member
Feb 19, 2017
320 posts
136 upvotes
blitzforce wrote:
Jan 11th, 2018 11:34 am
I'm still trying to figure out how controllers are only getting paid 90k. A lot of senior accountants I know already make 80k or 75k+bonus. Is this a really small company?
They are controllers at small companies. Size and profitability of the company are huge factors.
Also, as djfunk said, he has stock options. I wouldn't factor education, but options are as good as cash once you've been at a company for a while and they are vesting regularly.
At a large public company, the corporate controller (not divisional) would be a VP and making 300-500K all in.
Member
Mar 4, 2010
440 posts
136 upvotes
Toronto
Walch1102 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 3:01 pm
180-500K? That's a HUGE range.
Are you basically saying you don't know how much they make or is the difference between the CEO and CFO (usually the least valued of the c-suite) that large?
I do know how much they make. i Said between 180k-500k as a range so that it is not so specific. the CEO doesn't make exactly 500k and the CFO doesnt make 180k :P
Member
Jul 1, 2017
216 posts
119 upvotes
oasis100 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 3:13 pm
Lets get back to what the OP is asking and why he is asking this..
why is everyone going on about being a controller.
Because people are ********.

There's this misconception that accounting wages are +150k.

"It depends"

Some troll believes everyone with a controller title should be in the 150k range. This shows ignorance and a complete lack of employment logic.

You are paid what you are worth; experience dictates wage. People in high developing roles (like me) are loving life. Instead of looking at these external considerations (i.e. things above wage), some people can't look past a wage.

Here, I'll spell it out. 8 years experience; I needed a good leadership role and title to boost me into c-suit prospects. I'll take a discount to get that. I believe I'm worth 90k today; 3 years in this capacity translates into 11 years in the field, 4 of which will be post designation. At that point in time, I'll reevaluate wages.

Until then, I'm happy with 90/100/110-115, which is likely where I'll be at with this role with this company over the next 3 years.
Member
Feb 19, 2017
320 posts
136 upvotes
HelloWorld3 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 4:21 pm
Because people are ********.

There's this misconception that accounting wages are +150k.

"It depends"

Some troll believes everyone with a controller title should be in the 150k range. This shows ignorance and a complete lack of employment logic.

You are paid what you are worth; experience dictates wage. People in high developing roles (like me) are loving life. Instead of looking at these external considerations (i.e. things above wage), some people can't look past a wage.

Here, I'll spell it out. 8 years experience; I needed a good leadership role and title to boost me into c-suit prospects. I'll take a discount to get that. I believe I'm worth 90k today; 3 years in this capacity translates into 11 years in the field, 4 of which will be post designation. At that point in time, I'll reevaluate wages.

Until then, I'm happy with 90/100/110-115, which is likely where I'll be at with this role with this company over the next 3 years.
Experience is part of it for sure. Achievements, who you know, and willingness to take a call from a recruiter are some of the others. There are 30 yr old getting paid 200+ just from a willingness to take calls from recruiters and jump ship at a moment's notice, backed by solid work achievements and strong references.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 2, 2013
5245 posts
1113 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Oilfield and road construction trucker, heavy/oilfield equipment operator, apprentice electrician. (Both self-employed contractor and another's employee)
Also have some real estate and smaller (mostly small cap) stock investments.

Rate/day I have been getting is $0 - 967.20/day (each project's pay scale is different).

2017: $96,117.60 after taxes (AB). 87417.40 excluding rental. 115,141.60 to include unrealized capital gains, before transaction costs.
Oilfield Services Operator and Consulting Contractor
Serving Western Canada since 2013
Deal Fanatic
Nov 2, 2013
5245 posts
1113 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Walch1102 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 3:17 pm
They are controllers at small companies. Size and profitability of the company are huge factors.
Also, as djfunk said, he has stock options. I wouldn't factor education, but options are as good as cash once you've been at a company for a while and they are vesting regularly.
At a large public company, the corporate controller (not divisional) would be a VP and making 300-500K all in.
A lot of higher positions are like that and produce a huge variance of income, especially if incentive pay/profit sharing, stock options, etc. are involved.

e.g. One client I worked for has the General/Project Manager whose salary isn't the moon and sky, but he owns 25% of two pieces of oilfield equipment (about $80,000 market value together that brought in approx. $350,000 profit in 2016) in addition to shares of the company. So the equipment profit alone would had easily pushed him into the $160,000+ range on top of salary. This guy left a long-time city government job with generous salary, pension, benefits, etc. for his current higher-risk but higher-reward gig.

RE agents and auto sales are another big or no-money area; some make $40,000/year while others can manage $300,000. One lady at my local Porsche dealer (which is part of a larger auto dealer ring that pays fixed commission rates per vehicle sale, on top of certain sales target bonuses) was racking in $20,000/month just in per-vehicle commissions alone at one point. But sometimes they sit very long with no sale.

Other companies commonly include commission % of a company's profit, certain number of shares in the company, commission % of sales dollar volume or set dollar amount per transaction, etc. Some pillars of finance, especially the investment side, have incentive-based pay systems to encourage sales and portfolio performance.
Oilfield Services Operator and Consulting Contractor
Serving Western Canada since 2013
Newbie
Feb 24, 2011
51 posts
5 upvotes
Edmonton
Heavy Equipment Technician in Alberta making $90,000 yr base salary up to $130,000 yr with overtime. Started out with F&%$ all as a lowly recruit in the Canadian military in 2002. Left in 2008 once my training a Vehicle Technician was complete/transferred to a licenced journeyman , then worked for a defence contractor till 2016 when they closed the plant down and laid everyone off.

Nowadays I'm working for a oil/mining heavy equipment service provider. The upper crust of the Heavy Duty Mechanic world IMO in Alberta are the field guys, the ones who travel around the province servicing equipment. Those boys have to know their shit but can make $150,000 to $200,000 a year. I also hold a finance diploma .

Have been making on average $100,000 a year since 2007. Not an easy road in the trades but $$ is to be made if you can hack the less than ideal work environments, monotonous tasks, and red neck/macho, divorced chain smoking alcoholic, old boys club mentality that is all to common in this line of work. Ah some days I long for an office with a downtown view and an expensive piece of paper hanging on my wall lol.
Newbie
Jan 6, 2018
5 posts
I own a photography business and several studios. ~250k/year

I also get paid to write sponsored content online ~15k
Member
Feb 19, 2017
320 posts
136 upvotes
FirstGear wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 5:27 pm
A lot of higher positions are like that and produce a huge variance of income, especially if incentive pay/profit sharing, stock options, etc. are involved.

e.g. One client I worked for has the General/Project Manager whose salary isn't the moon and sky, but he owns 25% of two pieces of oilfield equipment (about $80,000 market value together that brought in approx. $350,000 profit in 2016) in addition to shares of the company. So the equipment profit alone would had easily pushed him into the $160,000+ range on top of salary. This guy left a long-time city government job with generous salary, pension, benefits, etc. for his current higher-risk but higher-reward gig.

RE agents and auto sales are another big or no-money area; some make $40,000/year while others can manage $300,000. One lady at my local Porsche dealer (which is part of a larger auto dealer ring that pays fixed commission rates per vehicle sale, on top of certain sales target bonuses) was racking in $20,000/month just in per-vehicle commissions alone at one point. But sometimes they sit very long with no sale.

Other companies commonly include commission % of a company's profit, certain number of shares in the company, commission % of sales dollar volume or set dollar amount per transaction, etc. Some pillars of finance, especially the investment side, have incentive-based pay systems to encourage sales and portfolio performance.
20k a month is probably the peak for a auto salesman and not sustainable. I've never met a single auto salesman who made more than 200 while doing personal taxes. That was including the guys at the high volume dealerships like Toyota and the ultra wealthy low volume dealerships like ferarris. Most of the really good ones made 100-150.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 2, 2013
5245 posts
1113 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Walch1102 wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 6:28 pm
20k a month is probably the peak for a auto salesman and not sustainable. I've never met a single auto salesman who made more than 200 while doing personal taxes. That was including the guys at the high volume dealerships like Toyota and the ultra wealthy low volume dealerships like ferarris. Most of the really good ones made 100-150.
It's not the normal, that was during the Alberta boom years that produced a impulsive populace with little to no financial literacy who'd churn through pickup after pickup, car after car, starting on the same loan. The money was in the high volume common vehicles like regular pickup trucks and soccer mom SUVs, not the high end.

Though in Vancouver area there are a lot of similar customers from Bank of Mom and Dad (or bank from Asia), along with the wannabes. Lots of BMW, Audi leasers living in the Mom's basement who will churn through a new one every 2-3 years. Many are repeat customers.

Fixed commission here is usually around $500/vehicle, 1000/vehicle for luxury/high end beyond a certain price point. When things were going full tilt the good ones were selling 1-2 vehicles a day. Some of the dealer rings here also have incentive systems for the shoppers, such as $500-1000 cash credit for each referral.
Jake1982 wrote:
Jan 13th, 2018 6:12 pm
Heavy Equipment Technician in Alberta making $90,000 yr base salary up to $130,000 yr with overtime. Started out with F&%$ all as a lowly recruit in the Canadian military in 2002. Left in 2008 once my training a Vehicle Technician was complete/transferred to a licenced journeyman , then worked for a defence contractor till 2016 when they closed the plant down and laid everyone off.

Nowadays I'm working for a oil/mining heavy equipment service provider. The upper crust of the Heavy Duty Mechanic world IMO in Alberta are the field guys, the ones who travel around the province servicing equipment. Those boys have to know their shit but can make $150,000 to $200,000 a year. I also hold a finance diploma .

Have been making on average $100,000 a year since 2007. Not an easy road in the trades but $$ is to be made if you can hack the less than ideal work environments, monotonous tasks, and red neck/macho, divorced chain smoking alcoholic, old boys club mentality that is all to common in this line of work. Ah some days I long for an office with a downtown view and an expensive piece of paper hanging on my wall lol.
Believe it, as everyone knows trucking and construction companies run shit that don't work. If it breaks down, blame it on the operator or mechanics. Rates are dropping more by the year because of the cheap new Canadians and everybody else cramming into the business, willing to do more or anything for less money. Only way many trucking outfits make money now is to run POS that's hardly legal. On the bright side keeps the mechanic employed. I feel bad for the poor ones that are worked to death for barely keeping our fleets running, and then called out to the bush. Some of them can be away for 19 hours at a time because they got a call into the bush somewhere at 3AM, where the one broke down has no cell service and dispatch can't give accurate directions. We had one guy "broke" down in Manitoba but later learned he didn't know where or what the Positive Air Shut Off Value was. Then a few truckers over the years that just disappeared, and then later we'd find the trucks sitting running at the nearby airport. Since then at that shop the management got every truck's value spray painted pink.

Naturally as driving truck since I was 20 that'd be the route to take for myself, but don't see myself doing it for a long time. I was working on a Math and Economics Degree until 2013 (4th year), with Commerce and Computer Science Minor if I finished. The mechanics deserve every penny, as I most of us already hate running the POS equipment ourselves; can't imagine having to work on and maintain them just enough to keep the company's ROA/ROI maximized. I'll be fine as an investor/business owner for the long term.
Oilfield Services Operator and Consulting Contractor
Serving Western Canada since 2013
Sr. Member
Nov 8, 2006
657 posts
140 upvotes
Toronto
Technical engineer for big pharma - 100k+ for the past 3 years since i am at this position.
Rental income, investments are not counted.

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