Off Topic

What happens if you don't tip?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 13th, 2019 5:28 pm
Tags:

Poll: what happens if you don't tip? AT ALL.

  • Total votes: 78. You have voted on this poll.
1. They provide you terrible service if they see you there again
 
25
32%
2. They politely hold back their eff yous
 
30
38%
3. They say something directly to you
 
11
14%
4. other explain
 
12
15%
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 26, 2011
1597 posts
340 upvotes
smacd wrote:
Jan 5th, 2019 12:32 am
No I don't tip my dentist or my mechanic, because they already get paid very well for their proficiency. I don't tip my csr at Walmart, because it's a fairly low skilled job and if they are interested in their career, they will progress through the company, as will their wages. As a server, your wages rarely increase unless there's an increase in minimum wage, so the way to get ahead is to increase your skill level and increase your tips. This is the incentive to be a better server. It also makes it a much more rewarding experience when you can help a table enjoy their evening (or day) out. Tipping is not mandatory in Canada, so better servers make better money.
I don't think you can be the judge of whether someone gets paid very well for their proficiency. Many professionals are overworked and have to go through much more schooling in order to get paid 'very well'. It's not society's responsibility to compensate for waiters/waitresses because their pay rightfully doesn't compare to the salary of someone who went through 10 years of school. I can argue that the skill knowledge level for a waiter or waitress is similar to the staff at the bank who helps me arrange my mortgage or loans, but you never think about tipping them. The way for a waiter or waitress to get ahead is to use the soft skills they learn in that job and transfer that to another job where they can make more money. If they decide to learn more (ie. familiarize about wine pairing etc) they may also have more opportunities at classier restaurants which will pay more.

I tip generally 10-15% but don't agree with that logic you have there.
Penalty Box
Apr 5, 2013
3363 posts
884 upvotes
markham
kmarcie wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 5:51 pm
I don't think you can be the judge of whether someone gets paid very well for their proficiency. Many professionals are overworked and have to go through much more schooling in order to get paid 'very well'. It's not society's responsibility to compensate for waiters/waitresses because their pay rightfully doesn't compare to the salary of someone who went through 10 years of school. I can argue that the skill knowledge level for a waiter or waitress is similar to the staff at the bank who helps me arrange my mortgage or loans, but you never think about tipping them. The way for a waiter or waitress to get ahead is to use the soft skills they learn in that job and transfer that to another job where they can make more money. If they decide to learn more (ie. familiarize about wine pairing etc) they may also have more opportunities at classier restaurants which will pay more.

I tip generally 10-15% but don't agree with that logic you have there.
ughh...ever worked in the business?...unless the place is governed by union rules..(hotels or chains)..then they are paying the servers government min wage (less than regular min wage)...period...working in a high end place gives more of an opportunity to make bigger tips as total checks are more and the amount of cheap SOBS is a lot less...as why would cheap bastards over pay for a meal when they won't pay for a tip...they only see a price ..not an atmosphere or social setting....they can justify it any way they want...but like I said earlier in this thread.....in my 20 plus years in the industry, there was a certain pattern that held true (and is obvious here too)...the non tippers were real dicks personality wise...and that holds true with people i know in my personal life..the dicks are commonly cheap tippers
Deal Fanatic
Oct 6, 2007
6480 posts
2581 upvotes
Kootenays
kmarcie wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 5:51 pm
I don't think you can be the judge of whether someone gets paid very well for their proficiency. Many professionals are overworked and have to go through much more schooling in order to get paid 'very well'. It's not society's responsibility to compensate for waiters/waitresses because their pay rightfully doesn't compare to the salary of someone who went through 10 years of school. I can argue that the skill knowledge level for a waiter or waitress is similar to the staff at the bank who helps me arrange my mortgage or loans, but you never think about tipping them. The way for a waiter or waitress to get ahead is to use the soft skills they learn in that job and transfer that to another job where they can make more money. If they decide to learn more (ie. familiarize about wine pairing etc) they may also have more opportunities at classier restaurants which will pay more.

I tip generally 10-15% but don't agree with that logic you have there.
Which is precisely the logic I stated.
"As a server, your wages rarely increase unless there's an increase in minimum wage, so the way to get ahead is to increase your skill level and increase your tips. This is the incentive to be a better server."
Don't fool yourself to think that the wages are higher in fine dining establishments. The pay becomes higher because the average cover is higher and 15% of the higher bill translates to higher earnings.

When I worked as a server, mostly in the 80's and early 90's, my wage was from $3.80/hour to $5.20/hour. A bank teller was typically in the $12-$15/hour range and someone handling your mortgage was paid higher than a teller.
Member
Jan 24, 2018
216 posts
41 upvotes
nasa25 wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 4:32 pm
Thanks.

Gonna work on my grade 11s sometime this year or maybe next.

Thanks in advance for the scholarly advice.
Better late than never. I applaud you for going back to high school to get your grade 11, and hopefully going for the grandslam your grade 12 diploma. After that you can probably get into some career college if you're in the states or college here in canada
Member
Jan 24, 2018
216 posts
41 upvotes
smacd wrote:
Jan 5th, 2019 12:32 am
No I don't tip my dentist or my mechanic, because they already get paid very well for their proficiency. I don't tip my csr at Walmart, because it's a fairly low skilled job and if they are interested in their career, they will progress through the company, as will their wages. As a server, your wages rarely increase unless there's an increase in minimum wage, so the way to get ahead is to increase your skill level and increase your tips. This is the incentive to be a better server. It also makes it a much more rewarding experience when you can help a table enjoy their evening (or day) out. Tipping is not mandatory in Canada, so better servers make better money.
LOL listen to this kid
he says that walmart sales associates are a non-skilled job, but claims that being a server is skilled. LMFAO! he then states that walmart sales associates can rise up through the ranks .. and what? you servers cant? servers cant become shift managers or bar managers and keep moving up? this kid makes me laugh.
What about sales associates at high end stores ? i have one friend who is pretty wealthy and have gone with her to some of those "designer" stores and sales associates spend like 3 hours 1 on 1 with her. Yet you claim sales associates dont have skill

the best explanation for tipping out there is this video below
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 26, 2011
1597 posts
340 upvotes
smacd wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 8:53 pm
Which is precisely the logic I stated.
"As a server, your wages rarely increase unless there's an increase in minimum wage, so the way to get ahead is to increase your skill level and increase your tips. This is the incentive to be a better server."
Don't fool yourself to think that the wages are higher in fine dining establishments. The pay becomes higher because the average cover is higher and 15% of the higher bill translates to higher earnings.

When I worked as a server, mostly in the 80's and early 90's, my wage was from $3.80/hour to $5.20/hour. A bank teller was typically in the $12-$15/hour range and someone handling your mortgage was paid higher than a teller.
But why do you need tips as an incentive to get better? Your desire to get paid more should be motivation enough. Again, I use comparison with a person working at a bank as a financial advisor or a teller - they are decently knowledgeable about their own field, as a waiter or waitress may be expected to be knowledgeable about their menu, yet bank tellers are never tipped and plenty of bank tellers are trying to get ahead in their own field.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 26, 2011
1597 posts
340 upvotes
cardguy wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 7:32 pm
ughh...ever worked in the business?...unless the place is governed by union rules..(hotels or chains)..then they are paying the servers government min wage (less than regular min wage)...period...working in a high end place gives more of an opportunity to make bigger tips as total checks are more and the amount of cheap SOBS is a lot less...as why would cheap bastards over pay for a meal when they won't pay for a tip...they only see a price ..not an atmosphere or social setting....they can justify it any way they want...but like I said earlier in this thread.....in my 20 plus years in the industry, there was a certain pattern that held true (and is obvious here too)...the non tippers were real dicks personality wise...and that holds true with people i know in my personal life..the dicks are commonly cheap tippers
I can't argue with your logic that people willing to give things away for free are generally nice people. Conversely, someone who doesn't want to give things away may be more selfish, sure. But that still doesn't mean that a server is entitled to a tip. So if the end goal for a server is to work in a place governed by union rules (hotels or chains), why isn't this motivation for every server out there, and why do the regular servers need tips to be an incentive to be better?

To answer your question, I have not worked in the business, but I've been in customer facing jobs that pay minimum wage or less (asian stores paying cash) where tipping is not a norm, and that's okay because that was my job.
Penalty Box
Apr 5, 2013
3363 posts
884 upvotes
markham
kmarcie wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 10:52 am
I can't argue with your logic that people willing to give things away for free are generally nice people. Conversely, someone who doesn't want to give things away may be more selfish, sure. But that still doesn't mean that a server is entitled to a tip. So if the end goal for a server is to work in a place governed by union rules (hotels or chains), why isn't this motivation for every server out there, and why do the regular servers need tips to be an incentive to be better?

To answer your question, I have not worked in the business, but I've been in customer facing jobs that pay minimum wage or less (asian stores paying cash) where tipping is not a norm, and that's okay because that was my job.
generally speaking..a hotel or chain (union type) is harder to land as its generally a secure job with benefits and even pension..tips are usually less also (if they are not already included in the bill..banquets, functions etc) BUT these environments generally protect the weak and have no incentive for the server to be better.

When I worked (mostly as a bartender) I could earn about 60k a year in tips (in the 80's and 90's)..never had to share (like all the current practices..which is BS in my eyes)..I learned the skill as I was brought up in it (started in grade 9)...started in clubs as a bar back and was trained by a few real pro's. Speed ,personality, and the ability to make single or lonely patron talk and open up..by the time they left the bar, they felt like they had a new friend!...did I get stiffed? many times....but no biggie as my average tip from tippers was well above the average.

Skill? I challenge some of the in this thread to try and make a living doing this...also for those that knock this living (which I would never)..its easy to be a no brain puppet and show up to a desk or a bank and do your meaningless tasks from 9 to 5 and collect the same pay every week..then when you are redundant..cry the blues...

The challenge is person that goes out everyday and had to work to earn their living...servers, sales people, service providers...the self employed!...these are the people I respect the most in this world ...not someone with a paper degree that can't negotiate a car sale or service agreement without realizing they are getting hosed. Degrees only prove you (had the means) and went to school...doesn't make you smart or better then the guy serving you his dinner.

Sure, some weeks you don't make as much as others, but overall over the year..its still a better than average living. But its not for everyone..being nice to every Tom and Dick can take its toll on you emotionally. ..so you have to keep that in check..but all in all..it was a great part of my like as when the great recession of the late 80's early 90's hit..I went back to what I knew best and it did allow me to raise my family ( stay at home mom too) and enjoy life. I have moved on from it now but both my daughter were trained as servers as a fall back and part time work and were easily making $200 a day when they did work..which is great while in Uni..

For some in here that talk condescending in here (and in other threads) and boast about not tipping...this is Canada and a way of life since before you were born...its not gonna change and karma always works itself out....I tip generously when I am out because when I go out..I know I am going to tip...if I don't want to be served or don't want to tip..I get take out.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 6, 2007
6480 posts
2581 upvotes
Kootenays
kmarcie wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 10:47 am
But why do you need tips as an incentive to get better? Your desire to get paid more should be motivation enough. Again, I use comparison with a person working at a bank as a financial advisor or a teller - they are decently knowledgeable about their own field, as a waiter or waitress may be expected to be knowledgeable about their menu, yet bank tellers are never tipped and plenty of bank tellers are trying to get ahead in their own field.
Things are a bit different today with higher minimum wage laws in some provinces. When I served, the only way to get paid more was to become better at your job by both providing better service, resulting in better tips, or to be able to serve more people at once, resulting in higher sales. Again, the salary of a bank teller was 3-4 times what my wage would be, but on a yearly basis, I could make 2-3 times what a bank teller could earn. I had friends working in city bars that received no wage whatsoever, but did very well on tips alone. Thankfully, I don't know if that ever happens now.
Member
Mar 5, 2012
246 posts
68 upvotes
Midland
cardguy wrote:
Jan 9th, 2019 11:55 am
generally speaking..a hotel or chain (union type) is harder to land as its generally a secure job with benefits and even pension..tips are usually less also (if they are not already included in the bill..banquets, functions etc) BUT these environments generally protect the weak and have no incentive for the server to be better.

When I worked (mostly as a bartender) I could earn about 60k a year in tips (in the 80's and 90's)..never had to share (like all the current practices..which is BS in my eyes)..I learned the skill as I was brought up in it (started in grade 9)...started in clubs as a bar back and was trained by a few real pro's. Speed ,personality, and the ability to make single or lonely patron talk and open up..by the time they left the bar, they felt like they had a new friend!...did I get stiffed? many times....but no biggie as my average tip from tippers was well above the average.

Skill? I challenge some of the in this thread to try and make a living doing this...also for those that knock this living (which I would never)..its easy to be a no brain puppet and show up to a desk or a bank and do your meaningless tasks from 9 to 5 and collect the same pay every week..then when you are redundant..cry the blues...

The challenge is person that goes out everyday and had to work to earn their living...servers, sales people, service providers...the self employed!...these are the people I respect the most in this world ...not someone with a paper degree that can't negotiate a car sale or service agreement without realizing they are getting hosed. Degrees only prove you (had the means) and went to school...doesn't make you smart or better then the guy serving you his dinner.

Sure, some weeks you don't make as much as others, but overall over the year..its still a better than average living. But its not for everyone..being nice to every Tom and Dick can take its toll on you emotionally. ..so you have to keep that in check..but all in all..it was a great part of my like as when the great recession of the late 80's early 90's hit..I went back to what I knew best and it did allow me to raise my family ( stay at home mom too) and enjoy life. I have moved on from it now but both my daughter were trained as servers as a fall back and part time work and were easily making $200 a day when they did work..which is great while in Uni..

For some in here that talk condescending in here (and in other threads) and boast about not tipping...this is Canada and a way of life since before you were born...its not gonna change and karma always works itself out....I tip generously when I am out because when I go out..I know I am going to tip...if I don't want to be served or don't want to tip..I get take out.
Nice lecture. But I do appreciate hearing your view as someone who has worked in the industry.

I have never been a waiter/bartender, here is my view as a customer: I expect people to do their jobs. Nothing more, nothing less. Be professional. Any tip should be considered bonus, not as any entitlement for a job professionally done. If I forget to tip, or if I tip 45%, I should not expect you to do anything different the next time I visit. Just do your job as a professional.

Top