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What were your top university/college programs and which one did you settle on?

[OP]
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What were your top university/college programs and which one did you settle on?

Does it also make sense to do a double degree, time and resources permitting?

Our daughter, grade 11, is having second thoughts about accounting and business.

Thanks in advance for sharing.
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alanbrenton wrote:
May 31st, 2017 11:18 am
Does it also make sense to do a double degree, time and resources permitting?

Our daughter, grade 11, is having second thoughts about accounting and business.

Thanks in advance for sharing.
A double degree is only as valuable as what you get out of it. If she's considering the UW/WLU double degree, the most valuable experience is always the work experience. Good, relevant work experience always speaks louder than your degree.

And (public) accounting is nothing like high school "accounting" (actually bookkeeping), though a strong understanding of journal entries and financial statements is essential. Does she want to go into accounting or is it a choice because she doesn't know what she wants in life?

For high school students I always strongly recommend taking a computer science courses. The logical thinking / tech skills you learn is invaluable in most fields (including accounting) and maybe she'll actually like it and pursue computer science as a career (and quite possibly leave you for a six figure salary in the US).
[OP]
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^ thanks for the tip. She did take a computer technology or programming course but I think it's more of an introduction than actual coding. She is taking an accounting elective as well.

I told her to check the occupations listed under the TN status since those are the current occupations deemed highly in demand in the US and maybe come up with a short list. It seems some of the most practical courses to take are Public Health/Sanitation (and maybe other public service jobs) because there will always be a need for inspectors but I'm sure jobs are too far and few in between because people have realized unionized public service jobs are so much more stable and less stressful.
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May 11, 2017
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Health Inspector is a good job. It's through Ryerson and I'd recommend it.
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alanbrenton wrote:
May 31st, 2017 9:57 pm
^ thanks for the tip. She did take a computer technology or programming course but I think it's more of an introduction than actual coding. She is taking an accounting elective as well.

I told her to check the occupations listed under the TN status since those are the current occupations deemed highly in demand in the US and maybe come up with a short list. It seems some of the most practical courses to take are Public Health/Sanitation (and maybe other public service jobs) because there will always be a need for inspectors but I'm sure jobs are too far and few in between because people have realized unionized public service jobs are so much more stable and less stressful.
No problem, choosing a career is tough, especially since so many have a laundry list of requirements just to get your foot in the door.

Whatever she decides on, I hope that she finds it interesting and that it motivates her because that's the best way to get job security and enjoy life.
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14MLTgrad wrote:
May 31st, 2017 10:08 pm
Health Inspector is a good job. It's through Ryerson and I'd recommend it.
Yes, two of my cousins went that path and they are enjoying their work.
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SoroSuub1 wrote:
May 31st, 2017 9:49 pm
For high school students I always strongly recommend taking a computer science courses. The logical thinking / tech skills you learn is invaluable in most fields (including accounting) and maybe she'll actually like it and pursue computer science as a career (and quite possibly leave you for a six figure salary in the US).
Do you mean a high school level computer science course?

What does Health Inspector do?
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cybercavalier wrote:
Jun 1st, 2017 12:56 am
Do you mean a high school level computer science course?

What does Health Inspector do?
Yes, a high school level computer science course to get some exposure and experience.
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May someone share some sketches of how an applicant or his or her family proceeded from considering university or college programs until the current steps of applying at OUAC? To me applying to university is a long arduous journey. I did not know if university is an appropriate choice. Ontario colleges' recruitment teams stress the hands-on learning and networking to the job market after college education. How can an applicant tell what lies ahead after graduation? Basing on admission average and interest to pick a career after graduation seems arbitrary to a defining decision of an applicant's life and the family. At this moment, I am thinking about checking the national statistics of salaries and other information of recent graduates. Going to post-secondary is also a drain of resources and effort to a family.

If I am in a college studying for one program, how can I take high school level computer science, business, accounting or other courses at ILC or distance learning to see if my interest lies in any content of those courses? I am afraid that any course at post-secondary contributes to GPA and that average is influentially paramount later on. By the same token, is Athabasca a good choice for any distant university learning? I read some posts that the human connection is lacking but helps per se in numerous ways at graduate school or professional school applications.

Another choice is going out of this nation for post-secondary education.
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cybercavalier wrote:
Dec 11th, 2017 12:00 am
May someone share some sketches of how an applicant or his or her family proceeded from considering university or college programs until the current steps of applying at OUAC? To me applying to university is a long arduous journey. I did not know if university is an appropriate choice. Ontario colleges' recruitment teams stress the hands-on learning and networking to the job market after college education. How can an applicant tell what lies ahead after graduation? Basing on admission average and interest to pick a career after graduation seems arbitrary to a defining decision of an applicant's life and the family. At this moment, I am thinking about checking the national statistics of salaries and other information of recent graduates. Going to post-secondary is also a drain of resources and effort to a family.

If I am in a college studying for one program, how can I take high school level computer science, business, accounting or other courses at ILC or distance learning to see if my interest lies in any content of those courses? I am afraid that any course at post-secondary contributes to GPA and that average is influentially paramount later on. By the same token, is Athabasca a good choice for any distant university learning? I read some posts that the human connection is lacking but helps per se in numerous ways at graduate school or professional school applications.

Another choice is going out of this nation for post-secondary education.
My team is working on a project that will help you with this. We will be launching Q3 2018. Help is on the way.
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Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
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Khairat wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 12:22 pm
I was wondering if I graduated from college in an engineering field and received my advanced diploma then continue with a degree in engineering technology in a university; would I be able to pursue engineering on a masters level?
burnt69 wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 7:33 pm
Extraordinarily rare. Administratively most graduate studies programs that are worth their salt require the completion of a Bachelors degree. And most universities at the Bachelors level don't tend to give much credit for a previously completed technologist program (although you'll be a superstar in many of the courses they force you take again!).
Employment opportunities are better for engineering technologists than full-fledged engineers though.
Update, I am enrolling a program at a college but I have been looking ahead. I am not alone or one of a few students doing this. Some classmates already have degrees in the field and come get a college diploma for better employment.
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Syne wrote:
Dec 11th, 2017 2:55 am
My team is working on a project that will help you with this. We will be launching Q3 2018. Help is on the way.
Well, in terms of economy, how about expanding it beyond the golden horseshoe. Less farmland? Anyhow, that discussion is beyond this student forum....
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