Students

What was your GPA when you graduated?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 12th, 2017 9:52 am
Jr. Member
Sep 2, 2016
151 posts
6 upvotes
cybercavalier wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 11:30 am
Frankly, can you guys share experiences -- big picture and/or minutes -- about how to keep up with such high GPA from freshman until graduation acquiring the master degrees?
The best advise I can tell you is to study hard. Do practise exam, exercices, problems.... when you have the right to have a memo sheet for an exam, make a good one in group...

What was the hardest for me (especially in graduate school) were oral presentations. I have disgnosed social phobia.... the best advise I can tell you is to practise loud. Go somewhere without distraction and alone at first. Then stand and practise your presentation loud and exactly like if you would be presenting in front of a public. Practise as many times it needs to be fluent from the beginning up to the end. For the powerpoint, make sure your figures and clear and that people can easily see the titles. Structure it well.
Jr. Member
Dec 12, 2016
138 posts
108 upvotes
Greater Canada
BsC Biology: 3.94 on the OMSAS scale
Advocate For The Removal Of Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) From Canada's Water Supply
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 20, 2008
1135 posts
183 upvotes
Coquitlam, BC
Highschool - 84% (2003)
University - 75% (2003 - 2007)
College - 86% (2007)

...everyone got the same piece of paper in the end if you passed. :-)
Deal Guru
Aug 22, 2011
13983 posts
3525 upvotes
Ottawa
DarkCanuck wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2017 12:01 am
Highschool - 84% (2003)
University - 75% (2003 - 2007)
College - 86% (2007)

...everyone got the same piece of paper in the end if you passed. :-)
Exactly, just a peice of paper, as your future employer will request transcripts and see your grades...LoL
Member
Mar 6, 2015
214 posts
4 upvotes
frank2243 wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 10:40 pm
The best advise I can tell you is to study hard. Do practise exam, exercices, problems.... when you have the right to have a memo sheet for an exam, make a good one in group...
What was the hardest for me (especially in graduate school) were oral presentations. I have disgnosed social phobia.... the best advise I can tell you is to practise loud. Go somewhere without distraction and alone at first. Then stand and practise your presentation loud and exactly like if you would be presenting in front of a public. Practise as many times it needs to be fluent from the beginning up to the end. For the powerpoint, make sure your figures and clear and that people can easily see the titles. Structure it well.
It is easy to be said than done. When scheduling, learning, looking for work experiences in co-op and internship, meeting MCAT or professional school GPA requirement, getting network and contacts et ceteara all come together in a few school year, it would be stressful.

It is nice to say in letters that challenges are welcomed...
Jr. Member
Sep 2, 2016
151 posts
6 upvotes
cybercavalier wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 5:14 pm
It is easy to be said than done. When scheduling, learning, looking for work experiences in co-op and internship, meeting MCAT or professional school GPA requirement, getting network and contacts et ceteara all come together in a few school year, it would be stressful.

It is nice to say in letters that challenges are welcomed...
Trust me this is not easy to say. I did that. It was not easy. I got down moments, but I succeeded to success with high GPA due to high discipline.
Deal Addict
Jan 3, 2009
1433 posts
224 upvotes
HS: 96%

3.97 GPA with Provost HR in final year

Just finished school/training - Surgeon (13 years post secondary education ... sigh)

Key to performing well is selecting something you love learning about. Don't pick courses because of the supposed ease of scoring well (it rarely works). Pick courses that you find entertaining and that you can immerse yourself into. Additionally, avoid Arts courses - marking is subjective and run on a different mark distribution. Things you essentially have control of grade wise are Chem, Physics and Math - and to an extent Bio.
Member
Mar 6, 2015
214 posts
4 upvotes
niroopg wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 8:39 pm
Given that you know the course material, may you tell us how to score well? I think there are ways to score well instead of knowing everything inside out.
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Jan 3, 2009
1433 posts
224 upvotes
cybercavalier wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 11:13 pm
Given that you know the course material, may you tell us how to score well? I think there are ways to score well instead of knowing everything inside out.

The less thoroughly you know the material, the wider the standard deviation/spread of potential scores. Certain courses allow for the capacity to score higher than deserving, if you are strong tactical exam writer (i.e. MCQ tests). But the reliability of scoring well with tactics is lower than simply understanding the content thoroughly and memorizing the lecture slides. The latter can reliability score about 90% if you know what you are doing without having to roll the dice.

It seems you are looking for short cuts and tricks. There aren't any. There are factors that are in your control (studying, understanding the material, attending lectures, striving to bridge learning gaps) and there are factors that you can't (IQ, natural ability). Worry about what you can control and do it in such a way as to reliability predict results. The best way to perform well is to surround yourself with people as smart as you want to be.
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2014
1889 posts
435 upvotes
niroopg wrote:
Aug 11th, 2017 8:39 pm
HS: 96%

3.97 GPA with Provost HR in final year

Just finished school/training - Surgeon (13 years post secondary education ... sigh)

Key to performing well is selecting something you love learning about. Don't pick courses because of the supposed ease of scoring well (it rarely works). Pick courses that you find entertaining and that you can immerse yourself into. Additionally, avoid Arts courses - marking is subjective and run on a different mark distribution. Things you essentially have control of grade wise are Chem, Physics and Math - and to an extent Bio.
Congrats niroopg! Now that you are done, just curious if you were able to pay down some of the student loans during your residency. I knew a couple of people owing tons of money when they finished (just family med though)
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Jan 3, 2009
1433 posts
224 upvotes
mkl38s wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 9:04 am
Congrats niroopg! Now that you are done, just curious if you were able to pay down some of the student loans during your residency. I knew a couple of people owing tons of money when they finished (just family med though)
Thanks! Fortunately, my student loans aren't too bad. I haven't paid down anything just yet because I just graduated, but its first on my list. I suspect it'll take in the range of 9-12 months to get rid of. The Canadian system heavily subsidizes our education - which always makes me wonder why they then create an environment that promotes many of the best minds to leave for the US upon graduation. Most of the population won't see the effect until a few years, but I see it right now.

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