Food & Drink

What's the deal on pineapples?

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  • Feb 11th, 2019 4:22 pm
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[OP]
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Nov 10, 2018
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What's the deal on pineapples?

I know absolutely nothing about how pineapples are grown, but I need some help here.

Here is an article, one of many, that indicate how devastating it is in Costa Rica for that community to grow pineapples: https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... production

The usage of pesticides is devastating to local communities, and is beyond comprehension in my books.

That said though, the detection of pesticides in pineapples is very low (in the fruit). The crown, and I believe the skin as well, of the pineapple have fairly high levels of residue. Does that really matter at the end of the day? I'd say no, not really. We cut those parts off and throw it in the trash.

What I don't seem to understand though, is how something that uses so many pesticides as part of the growing process seems to not make it into the fruit. Yes, even as a reasonably stupid person I know that pineapples have a thick skin, but fruits/plants, and everything green in our environment uses water to grow, and if the water is chalk full of pesticides, how does the plant itself not end up being a radioactive magnet for this stuff?

I really don't want this to end up into a "buy organic then!" discussion, because while I love pineapples, I tend to love drinking pineapple juice and that's not really economical to buy organic. I just read an article that showed me how absolutely bad orange juice is to drink from a pesticides perspective, and quite frankly, I can't even buy organic orange juice at Sobeys because all organic OJ sold there is from concentrate!

This is ridiculous now. When did healthy/pesticide free food become a luxury?!
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May 10, 2005
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angryaudifanatic wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 9:27 pm
I know absolutely nothing about how pineapples are grown, but I need some help here.

Here is an article, one of many, that indicate how devastating it is in Costa Rica for that community to grow pineapples: https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... production

The usage of pesticides is devastating to local communities[/b], and is beyond comprehension in my books.

That said though, the detection of pesticides in pineapples is very low (in the fruit). The crown, and I believe the skin as well, of the pineapple have fairly high levels of residue. Does that really matter at the end of the day? I'd say no, not really. We cut those parts off and throw it in the trash.

What I don't seem to understand though, is how something that uses so many pesticides as part of the growing process seems to not make it into the fruit. Yes, even as a reasonably stupid person I know that pineapples have a thick skin, but fruits/plants, and everything green in our environment uses water to grow, and if the water is chalk full of pesticides, how does the plant itself not end up being a radioactive magnet for this stuff?

I really don't want this to end up into a "buy organic then!" discussion, because while I love pineapples, I tend to love drinking pineapple juice and that's not really economical to buy organic. I just read an article that showed me how absolutely bad orange juice is to drink from a pesticides perspective, and quite frankly, I can't even buy organic orange juice at Sobeys because all organic OJ sold there is from concentrate!

This is ridiculous now. When did healthy/pesticide free food become a luxury?!
Bottom line, if you want to be able to buy the fruit, then they need to do what they need to do to be able to produce it at reasonable cost..
From concentrate does not mean it is not pure. Concentrated juice is a way of storing it to be able to have juice when the growing season is over.
When did "organic" become a luxury? Well, when producers can take a chance on weather, critters, insects and disease and sell whatever product is left, it is expensive to cover the cost and that cost is passed on to you.
You don't wanna know about bananas LOL
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Aug 22, 2006
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I'd be far more worried about the pesticides you get from organic farming than being worried it's from concentrate.

I also wouldn't look to see how "fresh" juice is made either.

There's a reason I squeeze my own sometimes (only sometimes because it's a butt ton of work)

Actually I'd just quit digging into food. You probably don't want to know.
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Oct 7, 2007
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death_hawk wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 11:24 am
I'd be far more worried about the pesticides you get from organic farming than being worried it's from concentrate.

I also wouldn't look to see how "fresh" juice is made either.

There's a reason I squeeze my own sometimes (only sometimes because it's a butt ton of work)

Actually I'd just quit digging into food. You probably don't want to know.
So true.

I think the closer you can get to eating unprocessed food, the better. Organic doesn't always mean pesticide-free either but when it is on sale, I will sometimes buy organic produce. I also think reducing intake of processed foods is probably a good thing.
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Aug 22, 2006
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choclover wrote:
Feb 11th, 2019 1:32 pm
I think the closer you can get to eating unprocessed food, the better.
Oh I was meaning unprocessed foods.

You 100% for sure don't want to dig into processed foods.
I barely want to and I know some of the dirty tricks....

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