Automotive

Wheel Balancing necessary after flat tire repair

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  • Oct 19th, 2009 8:22 am
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[OP]
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Mar 28, 2006
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Wheel Balancing necessary after flat tire repair

Does wheel Balancing necessary after a flat tire repair?

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10 replies
Newbie
May 18, 2006
74 posts
no... unless the tire broke the bead and turned on the rim... but unlikely.... why? you feel a shaking now?
Newbie
May 18, 2006
74 posts
now that i think of it.... it depends.....

if they just put a plug in its fine....
if they take the tire off and take it off teh rim and patch it that way... they should mark where the tire was and where the balancing weights were... then no balance required... if they didn't mark it... then they would have too......
Member
Mar 5, 2009
295 posts
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Montreal
evil812 wrote:
Oct 17th, 2009 7:55 pm
now that i think of it.... it depends.....

if they just put a plug in its fine....
if they take the tire off and take it off teh rim and patch it that way... they should mark where the tire was and where the balancing weights were... then no balance required... if they didn't mark it... then they would have too......
yes it does, every single time.

The only way to fix a flat that stays fixed for the life of the tire, is by using a patch, plugs are only temporary, and can damage even further the tire (to fit a plug you actually need to make the hole bigger=no good for the construction of the tire).

anytime you take off the tire from the rim, you need to rebalance, no doubt\question about it, you can gamble going to some 2-bit garage with monkeys working in it and have it done that way, in which case the rest of your car will probably be in the same shape the tire is in, so you probably wont notice if a wheel is off balance.
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Jan 22, 2004
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Toronto
evil812 wrote:
Oct 17th, 2009 7:55 pm
if they take the tire off and take it off teh rim and patch it that way... they should mark where the tire was and where the balancing weights were... then no balance required... if they didn't mark it... then they would have too......
The patch will change the balance, you can not just put the original weight to where it was. You always need to re-balance if they patched it.

Now if they just put in a plug, it is supposed to be a temporary fix and when you get a chance you should patch and plug it (from inside). This is the perm fix.
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May 10, 2005
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Yes, yes. each time the tire and wheel are disturbed in any way, it will need to be balanced. The weights used to balance a tire and wheel are as small as 1/16 or 1/8 ounce so even the slightest difference can cause a vibration.
[OP]
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Mar 28, 2006
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yes, make sense in theory. But I also wonder why you don't need to balance the tire as a regular maintenance. Because when you brake, you lose some thread (some weight). And the stones and small debris you pick up on you tire are also weights themselves if you think of it in terms of physic. They are no difference than the patch or the weights used.

I guess the correct approach is re-balance whenever you feel vibration. And rebalance after patch never hurts.
DragonZealot wrote:
Oct 18th, 2009 8:25 am
The patch will change the balance, you can not just put the original weight to where it was. You always need to re-balance if they patched it.

Now if they just put in a plug, it is supposed to be a temporary fix and when you get a chance you should patch and plug it (from inside). This is the perm fix.
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Jan 22, 2004
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82 wrote:
Oct 18th, 2009 10:03 am
yes, make sense in theory. But I also wonder why you don't need to balance the tire as a regular maintenance. Because when you brake, you lose some thread (some weight). And the stones and small debris you pick up on you tire are also weights themselves if you think of it in terms of physic. They are no difference than the patch or the weights used.
The loss of rubber in a single braking action is next to nothing compare to the weight of a patch. The loss of rubber over long period of time is distributed randomly (and evenly) around the tire so there is no need to re-balance because of the fact that you use the brake.

The stones and debris are again randomly picked up at different locations of the tire so again no need to re-balance of this. For bigger stones trapped probably you will hear the noise and would pry it off before you notice the vibration.
Newbie
Oct 19, 2007
46 posts
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Related question to wheel balancing.

About to put on a set of used winter tires bought over the summer. Should these be rebalanced as they were used on a different car? Does "balancing" tires take into account the type of car?


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JUZD Streetwear
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Oct 12, 2007
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snuffy2 wrote:
Oct 18th, 2009 3:59 pm
Related question to wheel balancing.

About to put on a set of used winter tires bought over the summer. Should these be rebalanced as they were used on a different car? Does "balancing" tires take into account the type of car?


Thanks,
No - you should be fine. Should be - the fact that the wheels have weights on them (to indicate a previous balancing) is no guarantee that those tires were balanced on those wheels and that the tires were never subsequently transferred, patched, etc. It's uncommon but it happens.
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Sep 14, 2004
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Toronto
simplytires plug/patched my tire...
showed me exactly where it was leakin' w/ the lube they use,
unmount tire, patch/plug and re-mount my tire,
balance also......

i think even if it's 1/16 or 1/8 oz difference, balancin' is still needed

imo~ correct me if im' wrong~
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