Food & Drink

Where can I buy hollandaise sauce?! (for egg benedict)

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 28th, 2017 2:16 am
Tags:
None
[OP]
Sr. Member
Dec 6, 2002
881 posts
42 upvotes

Where can I buy hollandaise sauce?! (for egg benedict)

does anyone know where i can buy hollandaise sauce? I've looked through a few grocery stores, but i dont know which section to look at.

I went through Superstore, havent tried TnT yet. please help!
21 replies
Sr. Member
Apr 7, 2005
504 posts
33 upvotes
I don't think Hollandaise sauce can be pre-made and stored. It's made out of raw egg yolks, and must be kept at a certain temperature (warm, not hot). If not, the sauce will separate. Even if a store does make the sauce and keeps it at the proper temperature, I'm not sure if I would want to buy a sauce with raw eggs in it that's been sitting lukewarm for God knows how long.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 10, 2006
7741 posts
79 upvotes
Georgetown
If you want it premade you will find it in the GRAVY section in powder packs at any grocers for about $1.25
http://www.us.knorr.com/products.asp?br ... d=1&nav=11

or....here's an easy recipe
Classic Hollandaise Sauce
[HOL-uhn-dayz] A rich egg based sauce flavored with a bit of lemon or vinegar, butter and a hint of cayenne pepper. The sauce is served over vegetables, fish, or Eggs Benedict.

The most important aspect of a successful sauce is to use a double boiler and make sure not to allow the water in the bottom of the double boiler to boil, just remain, hot and lightly simmering. You can add a tablespoon of cold water if needed to reduce the heat of the water if it starts to boil.

The sauce should be served immediately upon completion.

Makes: 1 cup

I N G R E D I E N T S
2 tablespoons white-wine or tarragon vinegar or fresh lemon juice
4 tablespoons boiling water
3 large egg yolks
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 teaspoon salt


I N S T R U C T I O N S

Melt the butter and keep it warm.

Heat the vinegar or lemon juice until just warmed. Have small saucepan with boiling water and a measuring tablespoon ready.

Place the top of a double boiler over (not in) hot water. (This means the bottom of the top of the double boiler sound not make contact with the water heating in the bottom half of the double boiler.)

Place the egg yolks in the top of a double boiler and whisk until they begin to thicken. Now add 1 tablespoon of the boiling water. Continue to beat the sauce until it begins to thicken. Repeat with the remaining water, one tablespoon at a time, beating the mixture after each addition.

Now add the warmed vinegar or lemon juice. Remove the double boiler from the heat. Beat the sauce briskly with a wire whisk. Continue to beat the mixture as you slowly pour in the melted butter. Add the salt and cayenne and beat the sauce until it is thick. Serve immediately.
See this button :confused: :confused: Learn how to use it PLEASE ;)
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 26, 2002
5583 posts
230 upvotes
BC
its usually in a package along with packaged gravy's and other sauces.

knorr makes one, and there are also a couple of others.. all you add is butter, milk/water, and bring to a boil. pretty simple, and they taste good.

when i make them from the package, i add way less butter than called for and a bit more of the milk/water.
That's my 2cents worth
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 9, 2006
620 posts
I agree with 3Weddings & CingKrab. Hollandaise Sauce is an extremely easy recipe with not alot of ingredients. In fact, you probably only need butter, eggs, salt a lil lemon juice. It's supposed to taste hot and fresh. Pre-made and powder is definitely not the way to go with this sauce.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13066 posts
624 upvotes
While a homemade hollandaise sauce is normally better than a packaged. If the OP is not one who is familiar with cooking or using a double boiler, it is very conceivable that you will not end up actually cooking the eggs. Along the same lines, make sure that you poach your eggs correctly (just a little acid in the water will help).

The packaged sauces are fine. I prefer McKormick's to Knorr. Given the ingredients of the sauce, packaged vs scratch won't be a big deal...

Along the same lines, think gravy. Sure, it is great to make a gravy from scratch. But for 90% of people, a nice packaged gravy (maybe with some of the drippings) would suffice.
Newbie
Mar 25, 2017
1 posts
I was on board with all of you until I went to Australia. Maille sells hollendaise sause in a small jar. (Found at Coles in breakfast sauces) You can not heat it up it will seperate. I'm still trying to find if they sell in Canada.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
18060 posts
4628 upvotes
nalababe wrote:
Sep 17th, 2007 4:47 pm
The packaged sauces are fine. I prefer McKormick's to Knorr. Given the ingredients of the sauce, packaged vs scratch won't be a big deal...
They certainly are NOT fine.

http://www.knorr.ca/product/detail/2594 ... aise-sauce
Corn starch, maltodextrin, salt, monosodium glutamate, canola oil, modified milk ingredients, citric acid, yeast extract, guar gum, spices, colour, concentrated lemon oil, modified corn starch, disodium guanylate, disodium inosinate, tocopherols and sulphites.

The ONLY thing in that entire list that's actually used to make hollandaise is salt.

https://www.mccormick.com/spices-and-fl ... -sauce-mix
WHEAT STARCH, CORN MALTODEXTRIN, WHOLE EGG SOLIDS, EGG YOLK SOLIDS, YEAST EXTRACT, SALT, ONION, SPICES (INCLUDING MUSTARD, PAPRIKA, TURMERIC), SOY LECITHIN, CITRIC ACID, AND NATURAL FLAVOR (INCLUDING LEMON EXTRACT).

While both recipes call for adding butter at least, they for some reason feel the need to add in milk and water respectively.
Why in the love of deity does hollandaise sauce have milk or water?
Along the same lines, think gravy. Sure, it is great to make a gravy from scratch. But for 90% of people, a nice packaged gravy (maybe with some of the drippings) would suffice.
I guess that's the difference between someone who likes food and someone who strictly uses it for nutritional purposes.
"Suffice" isn't good enough, at least to me.
I'm not saying you have to go all out and spend 3 days making a demi, but the least you could do is fake it a little by using something that at least used to resemble meat.
Even thickening up some better than boullion would be better than powdered. At least better than bouillon has the word "beef" in it (it's actually the first ingredient)

Compare that to
Clubhouse "Brown Gravy Mix" :
WHEAT FLOUR, CORN STARCH, SALT, HYDROLYZED VEGETABLE PROTEIN (SOY, CORN, WHEAT), PALM OIL SHORTENING, DEHYDRATED ONION AND GARLIC, SUGAR, CARAMEL COLOUR, GLUCOSE SOLIDS, MODIFIED MILK INGREDIENTS, DISODIUM INOSINATE AND GUANYLATE, SPICES, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, NATURAL FLAVOUR.


McCormick "Brown Gravy Mix:
ENRICHED WHEAT FLOUR (FLOUR, NIACIN, IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WHEAT STARCH, SALT, BEEF FAT, HYDROLYZED SOY, WHEAT, AND CORN PROTEIN, ONION, CARAMEL COLOR, CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, SODIUM CASEINATE (MILK), SPICES (INCLUDING WHITE PEPPER), GARLIC, NATURAL FLAVOR, DISODIUM INOSINATE AND GUANYLATE (FLAVOR ENHANCERS), EXTRACTIVES OF PAPRIKA, AND YEAST EXTRACT.

At least this has "beef fat", but it's so far down the list it's actually below salt. How much beef could there be if there's less beef than salt?

Compare that to Better than Bouillon:
ROASTED BEEF WITH CONCENTRATED BEEF STOCK, SALT, HYDROLYZED SOY PROTEIN, SUGAR, CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, FLAVORING, YEAST EXTRACT, DRIED WHEY (MILK), POTATO FLOUR, CARAMEL COLOR, CORN OIL, XANTHAN GUM.
It's not the best ingredient list, but at least Beef is first.

It requires a tiny bit more skill than dump and stir, but you get better results.
If for some reason you can't muster enough skill to do anything but dump and stir, use this as a thickener:
http://www.knorr.ca/product/detail/3676 ... wn-gravies
But making a roux isn't really that hard.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
18060 posts
4628 upvotes
DebboraH020 wrote:
Mar 26th, 2017 12:13 am
Maille sells hollendaise sause in a small jar.
INGREDIENTS: Sunflower Oil 47%, Water, White Wine Vinegar, Glucose-fructose Syrup, Free Range EGG Yolk 2.8%, Salt, BUTTER Powder 1.5%, modified Maize Starch, Acidity Regulators (Sodium Lactate, Glucono-delta-lactoes), Whey (from MILK), Protein Concentrate, Maize Starch, Acids (Lactic Acid, Citric Acid), MILK Proteins, Preservative (Potassium Sorbate), Flavourings, Lemon Juice Conentrate 0.1%, Thickness (Xantham Gum, Guar Gum) Colours (Lutein, Paprika Extract)


Yup. Exactly what I would have thought.
Butter is expensive. Better use oil instead. /s
https://www.maille.com/en_GB/hollandais ... daise.html
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13066 posts
624 upvotes
death_hawk wrote:
Mar 26th, 2017 12:43 am
They certainly are NOT fine.

http://www.knorr.ca/product/detail/2594 ... aise-sauce
Corn starch, maltodextrin, salt, monosodium glutamate, canola oil, modified milk ingredients, citric acid, yeast extract, guar gum, spices, colour, concentrated lemon oil, modified corn starch, disodium guanylate, disodium inosinate, tocopherols and sulphites.

The ONLY thing in that entire list that's actually used to make hollandaise is salt.

https://www.mccormick.com/spices-and-fl ... -sauce-mix
WHEAT STARCH, CORN MALTODEXTRIN, WHOLE EGG SOLIDS, EGG YOLK SOLIDS, YEAST EXTRACT, SALT, ONION, SPICES (INCLUDING MUSTARD, PAPRIKA, TURMERIC), SOY LECITHIN, CITRIC ACID, AND NATURAL FLAVOR (INCLUDING LEMON EXTRACT).

While both recipes call for adding butter at least, they for some reason feel the need to add in milk and water respectively.
Why in the love of deity does hollandaise sauce have milk or water?


I guess that's the difference between someone who likes food and someone who strictly uses it for nutritional purposes.
"Suffice" isn't good enough, at least to me.
I'm not saying you have to go all out and spend 3 days making a demi, but the least you could do is fake it a little by using something that at least used to resemble meat.
Even thickening up some better than boullion would be better than powdered. At least better than bouillon has the word "beef" in it (it's actually the first ingredient)

Compare that to
Clubhouse "Brown Gravy Mix" :
WHEAT FLOUR, CORN STARCH, SALT, HYDROLYZED VEGETABLE PROTEIN (SOY, CORN, WHEAT), PALM OIL SHORTENING, DEHYDRATED ONION AND GARLIC, SUGAR, CARAMEL COLOUR, GLUCOSE SOLIDS, MODIFIED MILK INGREDIENTS, DISODIUM INOSINATE AND GUANYLATE, SPICES, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, NATURAL FLAVOUR.


McCormick "Brown Gravy Mix:
ENRICHED WHEAT FLOUR (FLOUR, NIACIN, IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WHEAT STARCH, SALT, BEEF FAT, HYDROLYZED SOY, WHEAT, AND CORN PROTEIN, ONION, CARAMEL COLOR, CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, SODIUM CASEINATE (MILK), SPICES (INCLUDING WHITE PEPPER), GARLIC, NATURAL FLAVOR, DISODIUM INOSINATE AND GUANYLATE (FLAVOR ENHANCERS), EXTRACTIVES OF PAPRIKA, AND YEAST EXTRACT.

At least this has "beef fat", but it's so far down the list it's actually below salt. How much beef could there be if there's less beef than salt?

Compare that to Better than Bouillon:
ROASTED BEEF WITH CONCENTRATED BEEF STOCK, SALT, HYDROLYZED SOY PROTEIN, SUGAR, CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, FLAVORING, YEAST EXTRACT, DRIED WHEY (MILK), POTATO FLOUR, CARAMEL COLOR, CORN OIL, XANTHAN GUM.
It's not the best ingredient list, but at least Beef is first.

It requires a tiny bit more skill than dump and stir, but you get better results.
If for some reason you can't muster enough skill to do anything but dump and stir, use this as a thickener:
http://www.knorr.ca/product/detail/3676 ... wn-gravies
But making a roux isn't really that hard.
Why would you add milk to make hollandaise from a package? What do you think butter is made from? Also, The amount of butter that is added in for the packages is far far less than is usually asked when you make it from scratch. If you do make it from scratch then you also know that it can be very challenging if you have kids running around, trying to cook a lot of other items at the same time and don't have everything ready to go immediately. Hollandaise will easily break...even for the best of cooks. Having binders/starches will ensure the look/texture of an emulsion.

And the comment about using these if someone appreciates food ...I don't buy it for a second. I bet I could make something starting with something like bisto gravy granules that is equal or better than than what 95% of the people on this board could do from scratch.

For the record, I do love to cook, love food. In fact, all of our travels around the world are focused around food. I have taken cooking classes (either as group or private) around the world. One reoccurring theme from the chefs...people have get over the idea that you have to make everything from scratch for every meal. Back in the day, I used to routinely go to Dish when they offered evening sessions with several of Toronto's best chefs (Coulliard, Aprile, Capra...I want to say Froggett too) they routinely uses spick/mixtures packages/mixtures (aghast premixed with some of the ingredients you mentioned) and they use other ingredients that are packaged too. Do you think for a second that most of the higher end restaurants will make their own yoghurt if it is asked for in a recipe? How about beer or wine? How many are serving beer that has not been exposed to finings or sulfates as a preservative?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 3, 2009
4481 posts
338 upvotes
Toronto
I never used a hollandaise sauce packet before and likely never will. Not saying those packets are bad, those salad dressing mixes in the gravy section are probably a step up from the kraft bottles.

Doing the sauce I don't consider "easy" either. Starting out there were a few times I ended up needing to crack another yolk in to prevent it from splitting. After perfecting, I got a new range I failed on my first try...lol.
Remember to be an RFD-er and NOT a degenerate.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2007
3422 posts
152 upvotes
Loblaws sells hollandaise sauce in bottles where they keep the memphis BBQ, gochujang, chimmichurri, etc. sauces they make.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
18060 posts
4628 upvotes
nalababe wrote:
Mar 26th, 2017 7:36 am
Why would you add milk to make hollandaise from a package?
Got me. This is what Knorr recommends with theirs:

STOVE-TOP DIRECTIONS

In saucepan over medium-high heat, melt 1/2 cup (125 mL) butter; whisk in package contents until blended. Remove from heat.
Gradually whisk in 1 cup (250 mL) milk. Whisking constantly, bring to boil over medium-high heat.
Reduce heat and simmer 1 minute whisking frequently. Makes 1 1/2 cups (375 mL) sauce.

What do you think butter is made from?
Sure, but you don't spread milk on your toast.
They take a component of the milk (the butter fat) and concentrate it.
Even if you tried making butter from milk it's going to take A LOT of milk and a lot of work.

Also, The amount of butter that is added in for the packages is far far less than is usually asked when you make it from scratch. If you do make it from scratch then you also know that it can be very challenging if you have kids running around, trying to cook a lot of other items at the same time and don't have everything ready to go immediately. Hollandaise will easily break...even for the best of cooks. Having binders/starches will ensure the look/texture of an emulsion.
I'll give you that, but when it's literally ALL binders?
And the comment about using these if someone appreciates food ...I don't buy it for a second. I bet I could make something starting with something like bisto gravy granules that is equal or better than than what 95% of the people on this board could do from scratch.

I can't argue that since I've seen it first hand. It's even worse when restaurants do it.
But the point of the argument is that we're using too many fake things. It's not even food any more.
One reoccurring theme from the chefs...people have get over the idea that you have to make everything from scratch for every meal.

I can understand that convenience is a thing, but we're getting TOO convenient.
I mean... we have garlic toast that's frozen. Is it really that hard to make a garlic butter and spread it on bread?
The actual cooking process is the same.
Taste wise it's no comparison.
We're sacrificing taste for ease of use. And sometimes it's not even so easy.
In the case of hollandaise, there's no easy way to make it without specialized equipment (eg a whipping siphon or sous vide) but at the same time the packet stuff is just... nasty.
For other non-technical things though, convenience isn't even that convenient. It's 5% harder to make it properly than to overpay and buy something that's premade.
Do you think for a second that most of the higher end restaurants will make their own yoghurt if it is asked for in a recipe?

That can be the defining line between a good restaurant and a great restaurant.
Yogurt isn't the best example since it really isn't used in that many places, but mayo for example is made by quite a few places.
How about beer or wine? How many are serving beer that has not been exposed to finings or sulfates as a preservative?
I think this is actually why brew pubs and wineries are becoming popular.
People are realizing that mass market stuff is terrible.
While there's still going to be people that drink the cheapest beer just to get drunk and there's nothing you can do to change that.
But others are seeking out beers that are actually good.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 22, 2005
7605 posts
1029 upvotes
Shimso wrote:
Mar 26th, 2017 2:19 pm
Loblaws sells hollandaise sauce in bottles where they keep the memphis BBQ, gochujang, chimmichurri, etc. sauces they make.
Is it PC branded?
× < >
Rotate image Save Cancel

Top