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Where to fly drones in GTA?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 11th, 2018 1:09 am
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Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
7599 posts
3434 upvotes
Toronto
MusicBox wrote:
Apr 4th, 2018 9:53 pm
Just go and buy submarine drones..... they are underwater drones and they are fun to use in ponds and lakes!
they are going to ban those too, citing extreme danger to other boats, and to water intakes!
Member
User avatar
Apr 3, 2004
217 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto
youtube link ?
k thx
daivey wrote:
Apr 12th, 2018 7:10 pm
im flying my drone down the rail corridor to the CN tower right now.
I spray painted middle fingers on it for the on lookers.
Member
User avatar
Apr 3, 2004
217 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto
That's what I believe as well. Keep in mind you follow the Transport Canada regulations.

Then again, I've seen people fly drone by the bluffs in a boat. Obviously not 30m away from any vehicles.
gqbluez wrote:
Apr 12th, 2018 6:12 pm
Interesting. So if I live next to a park but I launch the drone from my backyard (my property) and I fly into the park, as long as I don't land in the park and take off again in the park I'm clear? Since I am physically not in the park it reads as if that would be legal and they couldn't fine you.
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
7599 posts
3434 upvotes
Toronto
nxkev wrote:
Apr 13th, 2018 1:27 pm
youtube link ?
k thx
Drone was captured by CSIS yesterday
Deal Guru
Mar 22, 2004
11191 posts
1650 upvotes
RFD
Isn't anything under 250 grams exempt from this really strict rules?

But on the flipside, how are they going to enforce the rules? As long as you don't do anything dumb like fly at the airport, find a nice wide open space and chances are you'll have zero issues.
Newbie
Jul 1, 2018
6 posts
Hi all, I recently took a course with a friend at buttonville airport from www.sugudrones.com. Once we found out how easy the application process was it was a no brainer. For one it is not worth the risk. The course I took was $399 and it prepared me for SFOC filing and application. I have since filed 3 applications and now I have a blanket to fly province wide. Long story short, there are options. Take a minute to research the drone schools out there, don't break the rules (you will be caught).
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 12, 2006
1437 posts
286 upvotes
North York
fredthomson wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2018 11:59 pm
Hi all, I recently took a course with a friend at buttonville airport from www.sugudrones.com. Once we found out how easy the application process was it was a no brainer. For one it is not worth the risk. The course I took was $399 and it prepared me for SFOC filing and application. I have since filed 3 applications and now I have a blanket to fly province wide. Long story short, there are options. Take a minute to research the drone schools out there, don't break the rules (you will be caught).
Once you have course certification, you're allowed to fly drone anywhere??
Newbie
Jul 1, 2018
6 posts
With a blanket standing SFOC you are (province wide).

This happens when you file a couple of SFOC'S. Basically demonstrating to Transport you are safe operator. There are different categories to file complex, compliant etc etc. Just takes a bit of education Transport Canada also supplies this information free on there site if your looking to investigate.

Nevertheless some rules will also be changing in regards to drone operation by the end of the year (Gazette II).
Last edited by fredthomson on Jul 12th, 2018 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 12, 2006
1437 posts
286 upvotes
North York
fredthomson wrote:
Jul 12th, 2018 12:12 pm
With a blanket standing SFOC you are (province wide).

This happens when you file a couple of SFOC'S. Basically demonstrating to Transport you are safe operator. There are different categories to file complex, compliant etc etc. Just takes a bit of education Transport Canada also supplies this information free on there site if your looking to investigate.

Nevertheless some rules will also be changing in regards to drone operation by the end of the year (Gazette II).
But I imagine, you still can't fly them in the downtown core or anywhere near buildings or airports, right? Where exactly are you allowed to fly now that you couldn't before you got the certification for example?
Newbie
Jul 1, 2018
6 posts
It pays to do a bit of research there are numerous drone training units in Toronto. These guys (Sugudrones) are out Buttonville (off 404 in markham), there is also Aerobotika (Mississauga Sandman Hotel), and Altohelix in Oshawa.

In doing a price comparison (for me) they were cheaper. They also have another course which is $399 (2 days). Either way research is key you need to compare your options see whats out there. Use google, its a good friend.
Newbie
Jul 1, 2018
6 posts
To answer your question everywhere. I was hampered by not having a SFOC. Not much time to go into symantics, but having an SFOC pays. Go through the process it's peace of mind. To answer your question directly in Ontario I can fly near airports, built up areas etc etc (minumum seperation distances apply). Where the standard drone pilot has to think is this operation safe, I don't have to anymore (I know) I have the approvals the check list etc etc.

The best thing for you to do is sign up to a course or just visit Transport Canadas website. It will explain all the caregories and what you can and can not do.

Everything is possible it's just the time or effort associated, and how much your willing to invest.
Sr. Member
Jan 10, 2009
645 posts
228 upvotes
Toronto
fredthomson wrote:
Jul 12th, 2018 12:37 pm
Where the standard drone pilot has to think is this operation safe, I don't have to anymore (I know) I have the approvals the check list etc etc.
Just to respond to this, you still have to always think "is this operation safe". Just because you've completed a course doesn't remove you from the responsibility to fly and operate safely.
Newbie
Jul 1, 2018
6 posts
You are absolutely right. I would like to state my original point: If you are educated, and follow the rules you can fly (safety is critical). There was an undertone in this thread, about blatently breaking the rules (regulations).

There are no restrictions just following the rules. Furthermore in regards to your comments about safety that's what check list are for (which I did remark on). They allow you to methodically assess the situation (one of the requirements for an SFOC). When I said... "I know", it meant 0 uncertainty which means 0 risk which every operator should strive for (check list reduce risk and are a critical part of safety). To expand there will always be risk but if you can reduce them (critical steps) before you fly, then you know when its appropriate to launch your drone (go/no go). I like to say its the safest wishing you were in the air then wishing you were on the ground (0 risk). Knowing when to launch your drone is key.

I don't claim to know everything, but with Standing Operating Procedures, & operations manuals every operation can be at it's best.

In terms of my point to be on this thread is education, not to get into symantics. The earlier discussion points were very dangerous. Thus I decided to chime in. Education is key. Thus I suggest everyone on this thread research and read Transport Canadas rules and regulations. Not knowing leads to uncertainty, and uncertainty leads to hesitation and making the wrong decisions (have a checklist), thus reading material going through the procedures will help everyone (know your airspace). Checklist have been a critical portion in manned aviation, and as we reflect on the next 100 years of aviation we have to know where were coming from to know where were going (manned aviation great example). In closing safety is paramount and I believe everyone should be educated which is what Transport Canada is proposing (everyone becoming licensed Gazette II). It wont prevent all incidents/accidents but it will prevent most.
Last edited by fredthomson on Jul 12th, 2018 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 12, 2006
1437 posts
286 upvotes
North York
The reason I started this thread, is to try to find places to fly drones legally. Not to suggest ways to skirt the law.

I imagine that, even with SFOC certification, you still cannot fly in Toronto city parks, provincial parks or federal parks (since there are bylaws/provincial laws/federal laws) that outright ban this. Can you simply wave your SFOC cert in front of a park ranger in the provincial parks and be allowed to fly? I doubt it. So, I'm still somewhat confused about where you can fly once you have SFOC that you could not fly before. I understand that you'll obviously be more trained to fly drones, but what are some places for example, where you will be allowed to fly now, where before you cannot?

I mean, I don't see the point of getting SFOC certified if I still have the same amount of difficulty trying to find a legal place to fly them.
Sr. Member
Jan 10, 2009
645 posts
228 upvotes
Toronto
An SFOC is required for commercial or work use of drones, a general person doesn't actually need one. Having an SFOC allows you to get permission to fly near an airport, but doesn't grant it. Even with an SFOC if you wish to fly near an airport you MUST get permission from Air Traffic Control, and they have the right to refuse you. ATC must always give permission for any vehicle to operate in their airspace, and a SFOC doesn't remove that requirement.

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