Home & Garden

whole house humidifier

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 23rd, 2019 6:15 am
Sr. Member
Sep 9, 2013
570 posts
286 upvotes
Ottawa
I just bought and had installed a General 1042 flow through, and been keeping a 40-45 % humidity level, easy to operate and maintain. Cost was $399 installed.
Newbie
Nov 28, 2015
48 posts
11 upvotes
Brampton, ON
I hooked up a ball valve with lever to the bottom and a hose to that to drain directly to the floor drain. So all I have to do is open the lever on the valve and it drains directly to the floor drain. No fuss cleaning and draining. Also I add a little vinegar to the water in the humidifier once every 2 weeks to keep it all clean.
Newbie
Nov 28, 2015
48 posts
11 upvotes
Brampton, ON
Gee wrote:
Dec 9th, 2017 4:03 pm
I have the same one. How do you drain the excess water?
I hooked up a ball valve with lever to the bottom and a hose to that to drain directly to the floor drain. So all I have to do is open the lever on the valve and it drains directly to the floor drain. No fuss cleaning and draining. Also I add a little vinegar to the water in the humidifier once every 2 weeks to keep it all clean.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
30497 posts
5037 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
Wicked666 wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 2:09 am
I hooked up a ball valve with lever to the bottom and a hose to that to drain directly to the floor drain. So all I have to do is open the lever on the valve and it drains directly to the floor drain. No fuss cleaning and draining. Also I add a little vinegar to the water in the humidifier once every 2 weeks to keep it all clean.
Can you post a picture?
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
602 posts
374 upvotes
Markham, ON
I installed a Honeywell HE360 myself last year. I think i pad $200 for it

Had to cut some pex and install a Tee off value with 1/4" feed line to the humidifier.
There is a drain pipe from the humidifier to the floor drains. (Basically just a 1/2 tube you plug in and dangle to the floor drain)
Installation wasn't too difficult for any semi-handy person. Took me 2-3 hours from start to finish. The wiring parts was very confusing and took the longest.
There are lots of youtube video that shows u the process from start to finish

I set the sensor at 40%. It works well. Beat using a portable and hauling water everyday.

I notice it does waste quite a bit of water tho. (When it is running, I feel like less than 50% of the water actually get used, rest just goes into the drain.)
Initially I feel kinda bad about how much water it wastes. (I think it use 3.5gal/hr, and I guess it runs maybe 8hrs a day, so that's 28gal/day)
But then...doing the math, water is like $0.01/gal so that's like $0.30/day only.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
1992 posts
1000 upvotes
Mississauga
I am not too worried, but what is the accepted range for relative humidity for the current season we are having. I understand 40-60% is the norm. I have a GeneralAire 1042 connected to the furnace which is set to 60%. After a month of operation, the Hygrometer continues to read around 40%. Is it just too much of an ask for humidifier to go closer to 50%. I did check the solenoid before turning the humidifier on and all components seem to be functional.
Sr. Member
Aug 18, 2014
602 posts
374 upvotes
Markham, ON
IndyBeak wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 4:04 pm
I am not too worried, but what is the accepted range for relative humidity for the current season we are having. I understand 40-60% is the norm. I have a GeneralAire 1042 connected to the furnace which is set to 60%. After a month of operation, the Hygrometer continues to read around 40%. Is it just too much of an ask for humidifier to go closer to 50%. I did check the solenoid before turning the humidifier on and all components seem to be functional.
Do you see the humidifier running constantly when the furnace is on?
FYI, the humidistat that came with my humidifier is quite inaccurate. I think it is off by 10-15%. (I.e. if u set at 50%RH, it stops at 40% when check with other more accurate hydrometer)

Also, you don't want it at 50%+ in the cold of winter (-10'c or less). Your windows will likely freeze up due to the cold weather outside the and the coldness of the window. (For my double glaze windows at least, if you have some fancy triple glaze window it might be fine)
35-40% is usually an ideal range where ur windows won't frost up too much and you'd still feel comfortable. And the wood (flooring, furniture, piano) in your house won't be affected too much.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
1992 posts
1000 upvotes
Mississauga
pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 4:50 pm
Do you see the humidifier running constantly when the furnace is on?
FYI, the humidistat that came with my humidifier is quite inaccurate. I think it is off by 10-15%. (I.e. if u set at 50%RH, it stops at 40% when check with other more accurate hydrometer)

Also, you don't want it at 50%+ in the cold of winter (-10'c or less). Your windows will likely freeze up due to the cold weather outside the and the coldness of the window. (For my double glaze windows at least, if you have some fancy triple glaze window it might be fine)
35-40% is usually an ideal range where ur windows won't frost up too much and you'd still feel comfortable. And the wood (flooring, furniture, piano) in your house won't be affected too much.
Thanks, that's what I wanted to know. I am sure the humidifier runs as I can hear the solenoid click if I rotate the humidistat dial when the furnace is on. Also I see occasionally see some water which had drained out of the humidifier housing, so I am sure water supply is fine. I don't trust humidistat completely, so I take readings with a hygrometer. It is possible that the poor humidifier can only do that much given how tiny it is in the overall scheme of things, lol.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
11778 posts
11427 upvotes
Oakville
pinkdonut wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 2:16 pm
Initially I feel kinda bad about how much water it wastes. (I think it use 3.5gal/hr, and I guess it runs maybe 8hrs a day, so that's 28gal/day)
But then...doing the math, water is like $0.01/gal so that's like $0.30/day only.
You have options. Some flow through systems pulse the water flow to reduce water usage.
http://www.desertspringproducts.com/des ... pulsed.asp

If you have a drum style, you can also install a drain kit.
https://www.just-humidifiers.com/overflow-drain.php
Image

And install an automatic drain timer.
https://www.just-humidifiers.com/autoflush.php
Image
IndyBeak wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 4:04 pm
I am not too worried, but what is the accepted range for relative humidity for the current season we are having. I understand 40-60% is the norm. I have a GeneralAire 1042 connected to the furnace which is set to 60%. After a month of operation, the Hygrometer continues to read around 40%. Is it just too much of an ask for humidifier to go closer to 50%. I did check the solenoid before turning the humidifier on and all components seem to be functional.
If you recently installed the humidifier or recently raised the humidity it can take quite a while as even the drywall will soak up the initial moisture in the air.
If your house isn't air sealed very well you may also be pulling in dry air from outside.

Also make sure your humidifier intake tube isn't closed off (as it should be in the summer). If it is closed it wouldn't do much humidifying.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
1992 posts
1000 upvotes
Mississauga
engineered wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 11:57 pm
You have options. Some flow through systems pulse the water flow to reduce water usage.

If you have a drum style, you can also install a drain kit.

And install an automatic drain timer.

If you recently installed the humidifier or recently raised the humidity it can take quite a while as even the drywall will soak up the initial moisture in the air.
If your house isn't air sealed very well you may also be pulling in dry air from outside.

Also make sure your humidifier intake tube isn't closed off (as it should be in the summer). If it is closed it wouldn't do much humidifying.
Water wastage is not much of an issue now, so far I have only seen few drops of water coming out of the drain hose a couple of times. I think you are correct in saying that it will take a lot longer for RH to rise. I turned it on around second week of November so it has been just a month since then.
Deal Addict
Sep 12, 2017
1558 posts
128 upvotes
1. I have a new build home. Does installing a central humidifier yourself void any warranty on the furnace? Martiano HVAC installed my furnace and HRV, enercare believe installed the hot water tank. Could one install their own central humidifier and not worry about any potential warranty issues down the road?

2. Also for the outside temp thing, does anyone have their humidifier hooked up to an ecobee? Is that worth if if you do?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16510 posts
1537 upvotes
Thornhill
Shaner wrote:
Dec 9th, 2017 10:39 am
I recently went to have a humidifier installed and an HVAC guy I know and trust talked me out of it. He says they almost always cause rust and corrosion in the duct work as well as shorten the life of the furnace. Plus he said people have a habit of not adjusting them and/or not understanding how temperature differences affects the humidity level, so when the temperature drops quickly, suddenly the humidity level in the house skyrockets and mold forms.
You'd typically run it in the winter when the furnace air is hot and dry. I don't particularly think the humidity would be condensing anywhere. Even if it did condense, it'd evaporate quickly. Unless people are setting the desired humidity level too high. But someone please let me know if I'm wrong - I'm about to install one in a week or two.

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16510 posts
1537 upvotes
Thornhill
engineered wrote:
Dec 12th, 2017 11:57 pm
You have options. Some flow through systems pulse the water flow to reduce water usage.
http://www.desertspringproducts.com/des ... pulsed.asp

If you have a drum style, you can also install a drain kit.
https://www.just-humidifiers.com/overflow-drain.php
Image

And install an automatic drain timer.
https://www.just-humidifiers.com/autoflush.php
Image


If you recently installed the humidifier or recently raised the humidity it can take quite a while as even the drywall will soak up the initial moisture in the air.
If your house isn't air sealed very well you may also be pulling in dry air from outside.

Also make sure your humidifier intake tube isn't closed off (as it should be in the summer). If it is closed it wouldn't do much humidifying.
You sir, are such a helpful, brilliant, nerd.

thanks for the ideas...
bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 29, 2008
3126 posts
627 upvotes
reggyDeal wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 6:46 pm
1. I have a new build home. Does installing a central humidifier yourself void any warranty on the furnace? Martiano HVAC installed my furnace and HRV, enercare believe installed the hot water tank. Could one install their own central humidifier and not worry about any potential warranty issues down the road?

2. Also for the outside temp thing, does anyone have their humidifier hooked up to an ecobee? Is that worth if if you do?

1.) No it won't void any furnace warranty, but the builder or the sub contractor may refuse to service your HVAC unit if something happens within the first year. You will just need to hire someone else to service it for you, however I had mine serviced by the builder sub contractors even after installing my ecobee and AC.

2.) If you have the non lite version and the extra wires it would be best to let ecobee decide on how to best handle humidity, really would take the guess work out of it for those cold days that condensation on windows.

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