Parenting & Family

Why Breastfeeding In The First Hour Of Life Is Important

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  • Aug 29th, 2007 7:01 pm
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Why Breastfeeding In The First Hour Of Life Is Important

Why Breastfeeding In The First Hour Of Life Is Important
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/78485.php

Very good article, must read for potential new parents.

Click the link above for the whole article.
World Breastfeeding Week is supported by a number of global and national organizations, including the World Health Organization (WHO), who are keen to promote awareness about the importance of breastfeeding soon after birth because of the lifelong health benefits of receiving a mother's first milk, colostrum, the "perfect food for every newborn".

A 2006 study published in the journal Pediatrics suggested that 41 per cent of newborns that die in the first month of life could be saved if breastfed in the first hour of life.

The WHO also says feeding colostrum in the first hour increases the likelihood babies will continue to be breastfed which gives them a head start in the "race against malnutrition". There are 170 million underweight children in the world and 3 million of them die every year.

Colostrum is a sticky yellow-white substance yielded by the mother's breast soon after birth. It is rich in antibodies and essential nutrients. Yet, in many cultures, ignorant of its health benefits, the custom is to throw it away. Giving newborns water or other liquids denies them a "good start in life" says the WHO, referring to the WHO Child Growth Standards and how babies fed colostrum within the first hour of being born measure up well against the standards.

Breastfeeding in the first hour or so after birth also confers benefits to the mother, such as improved lactation and less loss of blood.
Newborns have a heightened sense of taste too, and this is particularly sensitive to the taste of breast milk. Mannel also said that "When mothers hold their babies skin-to-skin immediately after birth, their babies are kept warm, they regulate their heart, respiratory, and oxygen saturation rates, and they do not feel pain as acutely". Babies who have this experience cry less, and are calmer, she said.

United Nations (UN) agencies and the WHO have recently expressed concern that breastfeeding appears to be declining in the Asia-Pacific regions and this is making it harder for babies and children to survive. They want parents to become more aware of the risks of using breast milk substitutes.

At a conference in Manila in the Phillipines last month, experts told an assembly of doctors that breastfeeding reduces child mortality and they showed figures from Cambodia, where child mortality has decreased dramatically following a vigorous and successful breastfeeding campaign.

Between 2000 and 2005 the proportion of Cambodian mothers who were breastfeeding their babies until they were at least six months old jumped from 10 to 60 per cent, according to a BBC report from their correspondent in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. This compares with about 30 to 40 per cent across Asia as a whole, according to the WHO.

Child deaths in Cambodia over the same timescale dropped by over 30 per cent, which the WHO credits to the dramatic increase in breastfeeding. The BBC correspondent said that large posters showing mothers breastfeeding were commonplace and the government had set up breastfeeding friendly sites in towns and villages.

A Unicef spokesperson told the BBC that the average family in the developing world believes bottle feeding is better for the baby than breast milk.

Breastfeeding is particularly protective for those babies born in towns and villages where water quality is unreliable and can make formula feeding unsafe.

Child development experts say that breastfeeding benefits all children, not just those in developing countries. It improves cognitive development and reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, for example.
The mentioned article
Delayed Breastfeeding Initiation Increases Risk of Neonatal Mortality
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ... type=HWCIT
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Oct 17, 2004
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unfortunately not all mothers can have the option to breastfeed their child in the first hour...i am a good example of one.

after going thru 35 hours of labour, having my water broken by a doctor and being induced..I failed to progress. I also had 5 failed attempts to have an epidural set up. Anyways, so I ended up having an emergency c-section..with the failed epidural. I could feel each cut, each stitch during the c-section, so I told them during the surgery and they gave me more painkillers thru the tube. I ended up being numb from my tongue down, after the surgery. I could not feel a thing put to my tongue and they were worried my lungs would collapse or something so they wouldn't wheel me back to maternity. I was stuck in the recovery room for 2 hours. During the first hour, maternity kept calling recovery, trying to get me up, to see the baby and feed him. Recovery refused, saying I was not suitable to leave yet. They argued and eventually they bought the baby downstairs to recovery so I could see him. The nurse tried to help him latch on me but he refused and after trying, all we ended up doing was cuddle. Then the baby went back upstairs.

After 2 or so hours, they finally let me go upstairs to maternity. I saw my baby and tried to breastfeed but my body was still in shock from all the drugs they gave me (I had morphine, epidural, codeine..etc..all in my body) stopped me from lactating. I tried for the next TWO days with no colostrum coming out. I was devastated and the baby was starving..so the nurses told me on the third day we had to feed the baby and they gave him formula.

After getting out of the hospital, I ended up renting a pump, pumping every 2 hours, taking domperidone, fenugreek, heat pads, etc etc..anything I could do to get the milk coming in. On the seventh day, I had colostrum. On the 10 day, I could produce maybe 10mls (both sides, added together). I continued to pump every 2 hours until my milk eventually came in...i took about a month of pumping before I had enough to feed my baby.

I was one of the unlucky ones, who wanted to go natural, ended up surgery. wanted to breastfeed, ended up supplementing with formula (at first), then after 3 months I had enough to store.

breastfeeding ain't always an option.
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kaimui22, good job. :) You still insisted on pumping for seven days until the milk came. My respect to you. Many mothers just give up breastfeeding in this case. Can your baby able to latch, (I guess it is very difficult after 1 week) or you end up with using pump only?

It is very sad to see some mothers now treat C-section as 'fashion' and even persuade others to do C-section. Someone from Hong Kong ( as you are from Hong Kong too in anther tread, so you may also agree with this) told me that the whole floor of ALL, about 15 to 20, mothers had C-section :mad: .
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getmail99 wrote:
Aug 27th, 2007 12:37 pm
kaimui22, good job. :) You still insisted on pumping for seven days until the milk came. My respect to you. Many mothers just give up breastfeeding in this case. Can your baby able to latch, (I guess it is very difficult after 1 week) or you end up with using pump only?

It is very sad to see some mothers now treat C-section as 'fashion' and even persuade others to do C-section. Someone from Hong Kong ( as you are from Hong Kong too in anther tread, so you may also agree with this) told me that the whole floor of ALL, about 15 to 20, mothers had C-section :mad: .
Ha,thanks! I never managed to get my son latched on but I pumped for 6+ months so he would still get breastmilk :)

As for the very high (80%?) percentage of mothers in HK and Taiwan giving birth via C-section, it is not because it is fashionable, but because it is convenient. A lot of women in HK are very particular about which doctor they go to, and which doctor they want to deliver their babies..therefore, they will first book the doctor for a specific date/time to deliver the baby, so they won't have to deal with someone they don't know. Also because of Feng Shui, some people believe it is better to deliver on a specific date or time...

As for the convenience of the mothers and fathers, not everyone can get maternity or paternity leave in Asia. Therefore, if they arrange the birth beforehand, they can take time off from work. Another reason for the high number of arranged C-sections is because breastfeeding wasn't really popular in Hong Kong before the millenium. Many mothers rush back to go to work after the delivery of the child and they believe breastfeeding will prolong the healing process and their ability to lose weight...so if they deliver via c-section, the possibility of lactating and being engorged reduces.

One additional reason for the high percentage of c-sections is that a lot of mothers in HK are working..therefore a lot of women do not get pregnant until they are in their early or mid thirties. As women get older, the risk of childbirth increases...with a possibility of high-blood pressure, diabetes..etc..and it becomes a risk to both the mother and the child to deliver naturally. Therefore a lot of women deliver EARLY via c-section in HK.

Actually my birthdate is quite a story too...I was due beginning of June but my mom's doctor was going to go on vacation starting May 25, so my mom booked for me to be delivered, via C-section on May 24th (which is also their wedding anniversary). Anyways, the doctor decided to take his vacation earlier so my mom's appointment changed to the 22nd of May (which is a Friday). My dad didn't take time off until the 24th so when I was delivered, my dad only had time to go to the hospital and wait for me to be delivered, once he saw me, he had to go back to work.

Again, my birth was due to the convenience of the doctor. That's why there are so many c-sections in HK.
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I did not mean real fashion, that is why I put quotation marks around it, 'fashion'. It is more like a trend or convenience or 'oh, no big deal, just do C-section, quick and easy'. This sort of thing should not be encouraged by doctors.

I googled and found this interesting discussion.

http://www.geobaby.com/forum/thread98488-2.html
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getmail99 wrote:
Aug 27th, 2007 4:28 pm
I did not mean real fashion, that is why I put quotation marks around it, 'fashion'. It is more like a trend or convenience or 'oh, no big deal, just do C-section, quick and easy'. This sort of thing should not be encouraged by doctors.

I googled and found this interesting discussion.

http://www.geobaby.com/forum/thread98488-2.html
umm..i didn't mean it as real "fashion" either..when you say "fashionable", it means it's a trend, something to show off (hey! i got a c-section! and you didn't! ha! ) not a convenience.

there are many births of convenience in the states too...apparently a lot of people have a choice to deliver via c-section too..especially if they go to a private hospital. Look at all the stars giving birth via c-section....
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Jan 18, 2007
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personally, I don't see anything wrong with having a C-section if you want one. I had a C-section because my son was breech, but I was happy about that because I was petrified of going through labor. There are risks inherent in labor too. One of the things that worried me was risk of birth asphyxia to the baby. I had a very easy recovery from C-section and I would totally do it again.

I am very pro breastfeeding and unfortunately, my son had trouble latching and couldn't latch on for almost 24 hours even though he was skin to skin with me within an hour of birth.

kaimui22 - kudos to you for pumping for 6 months.
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kaimui22 wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 1:40 am
umm..i didn't mean it as real "fashion" either..when you say "fashionable", it means it's a trend, something to show off (hey! i got a c-section! and you didn't! ha! ) not a convenience.

there are many births of convenience in the states too...apparently a lot of people have a choice to deliver via c-section too..especially if they go to a private hospital. Look at all the stars giving birth via c-section....
When those mothers talk about c-section, they sound it like a norm. VB is like a special procedure. :|
mel_t wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 9:31 am
personally, I don't see anything wrong with having a C-section if you want one. I had a C-section because my son was breech, but I was happy about that because I was petrified of going through labor. There are risks inherent in labor too. One of the things that worried me was risk of birth asphyxia to the baby. I had a very easy recovery from C-section and I would totally do it again.

I am very pro breastfeeding and unfortunately, my son had trouble latching and couldn't latch on for almost 24 hours even though he was skin to skin with me within an hour of birth.

kaimui22 - kudos to you for pumping for 6 months.
I guess nobody is against c-section for breech child or what kaimui22 went through. We are talking about elective c-section.

Yes, we found out that latching for new born is not easy. So don't be discouraged, try it again next time. Actually, we found that the video shown is kind of misleading. We later discussed that those babies in the video are not newborn. They are at least a few weeks. They are 'well trained'.
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Forget an hour! Baby should latch as soon as physically possible! Minutes!

Now, obviously, that's not always possible - but when it is, as soon as the doctors/midwife has checked baby out and toweled 'em off a bit, on they should go! Why? Something about the smell of the stuff still on baby's skin helps trigger the latching instinct. That natural action is significantly reduced after baby's had its first bath and the smell is reduced or eliminated.

Both our babies had very little trouble latching - and half the latching effort is the mom, giving just the right push or nudge of the breast into position - and breaking the latch if it's not quite right.

I forget the specifics now that baby is nearly a toddler. ;)
I had an interesting signature once... then it was tarnished forever. :(
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BlueMax wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 12:57 pm
Forget an hour! Baby should latch as soon as physically possible! Minutes!

Now, obviously, that's not always possible - but when it is, as soon as the doctors/midwife has checked baby out and toweled 'em off a bit, on they should go! Why? Something about the smell of the stuff still on baby's skin helps trigger the latching instinct. That natural action is significantly reduced after baby's had its first bath and the smell is reduced or eliminated.

Both our babies had very little trouble latching - and half the latching effort is the mom, giving just the right push or nudge of the breast into position - and breaking the latch if it's not quite right.

I forget the specifics now that baby is nearly a toddler. ;)
Baby should go right from inside mother to the breast no need for cleaning/checkup at that point.
"Sometimes I dig the dirty yet sweet oriental pong of this frag, but I wonder if it really makes sense to smell like I've hidden spice bags in all of my pockets?" ~basenotes.net
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BlueMax wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 12:57 pm
Forget an hour! Baby should latch as soon as physically possible! Minutes!

Now, obviously, that's not always possible - but when it is, as soon as the doctors/midwife has checked baby out and toweled 'em off a bit, on they should go! Why? Something about the smell of the stuff still on baby's skin helps trigger the latching instinct. That natural action is significantly reduced after baby's had its first bath and the smell is reduced or eliminated.

Both our babies had very little trouble latching - and half the latching effort is the mom, giving just the right push or nudge of the breast into position - and breaking the latch if it's not quite right.

I forget the specifics now that baby is nearly a toddler. ;)
Good advice, yes, instinct. If the baby waits too long, the baby needs to be trained. Also, may be VB babies have more smell :) and thus better instinct. ;)
Diamondog wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 2:05 pm
Baby should go right from inside mother to the breast no need for cleaning/checkup at that point.
Yes, mothers should insist on this.
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getmail99 wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 12:04 pm
When those mothers talk about c-section, they sound it like a norm. VB is like a special procedure. :|

I guess nobody is against c-section for breech child or what kaimui22 went through. We are talking about elective c-section.

Yes, we found out that latching for new born is not easy. So don't be discouraged, try it again next time. Actually, we found that the video shown is kind of misleading. We later discussed that those babies in the video are not newborn. They are at least a few weeks. They are 'well trained'.
Actually c-section for some breech babies is elective. The birth of our child was c-section, but it was last minute emergency c-section. Baby was over 7 days late, and the cervix was going the wrong way even with induction. Baby's heart rate was also getting erratic.

In some cases although c-section is elective, it is suggested by a practitioner as it has less risk for mother and baby. I think we would all agree that we wouldn't want to put mother or baby at higher risk if it could be avoided (although there is always a risk with c-section as it is surgery), but it may be less risk. Yes there are ideals generally, but each case needs to be taken individually and only applied where valid.
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Jan 18, 2007
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what we're really talking about is "social" C-section. Any C-section that is not done in an emergency basis is considered 'elective' for example, for a known breech or other malpresentation, repeat c/s, elective C/S for twins, those scheduled for other medical indications. the only ones classified as urgent or emergent are those in which either the baby or mom is in immediate risk if they don't deliver and can't deliver vaginally. (can you tell I work in a high risk maternity hospital?)

honestly? I was thisclose to asking for a social c-section. so I lucked out and got a breech baby, but I really have no problem if a woman just would rather have a C/S. I know that goes against the norm, especially since I otherwise subscribe to most of the other more "crunchy" parenting ideals, but that's the way I feel. I just never felt the need to "experience" a vag birth.

regarding attempted vaginal breech delivery, there was a study done a few years ago called the Term Breech trial (it was actually based in Toronto). They had to halt the study because they found that the risks to the baby were too much with a vaginal delivery to continue. the likely reason for this is that there aren't many health professionals who are experienced enough in breech delivery to be able to do it safely.
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mel_t wrote:
Aug 28th, 2007 7:21 pm
regarding attempted vaginal breech delivery, there was a study done a few years ago called the Term Breech trial (it was actually based in Toronto). They had to halt the study because they found that the risks to the baby were too much with a vaginal delivery to continue. the likely reason for this is that there aren't many health professionals who are experienced enough in breech delivery to be able to do it safely.
Hey Mel, welcome to RFD. :D I didn't recognize you at first.

In terms of the Term Breech trial, I used to work for Dr. Hannah when that trial started. I was speaking to a couple of other researchers recently, and there was a lot of discrepency with the data that was coming out of the Term Breech trial. It wasn't designed as well as originally people thought. The results although still somewhat valid, a better designed double-blind clinical trial should be run to validate the Term Breech trial's results.
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Kranberry wrote:
Aug 29th, 2007 9:04 am
Hey Mel, welcome to RFD. :D I didn't recognize you at first..
you can be forgiven....I don't post much, so why would you? ;)
In terms of the Term Breech trial, I used to work for Dr. Hannah when that trial started. I was speaking to a couple of other researchers recently, and there was a lot of discrepency with the data that was coming out of the Term Breech trial. It wasn't designed as well as originally people thought. The results although still somewhat valid, a better designed double-blind clinical trial should be run to validate the Term Breech trial's results
interesting. I personally wouldn't want to participate in any kind of study that could potentially put my baby at risk. Too many unknowns. the only people volunteering would be people who would actually want a vag breech delivery. I wonder how that might confound the results if at all.

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