Automotive

Why do people drive with fog lights on?

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  • May 27th, 2015 5:43 am
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Deal Expert
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Jul 30, 2007
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the worst of those fog is when the owner modded to fit HID kit onto them, almost 3x the lumens as those of halogens fog.
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May 14, 2012
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chroma_cg wrote:
May 21st, 2015 11:24 am
why has this thread derailed to high beam discussion?

anyways, fog lights do not bother me, they are aimed lower and dont affect others
Fog lights bug the **** out of me when driving at night in the country in my Miata...especially those behind me. If you have fog light on any sort of SUV, they are level with my mirror. Its ignorant and inconsiderate of others to drive with them on when its not foggy /thread
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dudeexcellent wrote:
May 21st, 2015 3:20 pm
Fog lights bug the **** out of me when driving at night in the country in my Miata...especially those behind me. If you have fog light on any sort of SUV, they are level with my mirror. Its ignorant and inconsiderate of others to drive with them on when its not foggy /thread
Solution's easy... I just get behind them and blast them in return with my HID fogs.
Penalty Box
Dec 27, 2013
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fog lights suck.. even when there is fog they dont really do anything.
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Mar 17, 2004
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I don't have them in my car but sometimes I wish I did. Last winter on the 400 driving back at night, weather was *****ty, slushy grey crap everywhere and my headlights were super dirty. Made it difficult to even see the lines on the road. If I had fog lights it might light up the ground in front of me a little bit better. I had cleaned the lights at the gas station before departing Barrie, but 5 minutes in and can't see ***** again.
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Oni-kun wrote:
May 21st, 2015 4:16 pm
I don't have them in my car but sometimes I wish I did. Last winter on the 400 driving back at night, weather was *****ty, slushy grey crap everywhere and my headlights were super dirty. Made it difficult to even see the lines on the road. If I had fog lights it might light up the ground in front of me a little bit better. I had cleaned the lights at the gas station before departing Barrie, but 5 minutes in and can't see ***** again.
You can get cars with headlight washers I suppose.

Mind you, I have those headlight washers on my current car and have never once used them. As for fog lights, I have never used them in my current car (only 3 months), and I used them maybe 3 times in 11 years on my previous car. There was some benefit I suppose, but not huge.
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ToniCipriani wrote:
May 21st, 2015 3:32 pm
Solution's easy... I just get behind them and blast them in return with my HID fogs.
Auto dimming rearview and side mirrors FTW!
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vkizzle wrote:
May 21st, 2015 3:02 pm
Wow, exaggerating much?
Considering both vehicles are driving pass each other...it's only "in your face" a few secs!
Even if you see it from 1 mile away, the intensity is minimal!
Clearly you have no understanding of night vision ... When you are driving in the dark and suddenly a bright-ass light shines into your eyes for a few seconds (depending on how flat the road is) and then it passes you don't have your night vision anymore for some time and makes it harder to see stuff in the dark. Cars, animals, pedestrians etc. are less likely to be seen. You can reproduce this by going into a dark room, shining a flashlight in your face, and then turning it off and looking around. Granted this isn't as big of a problem if there are street lights providing ambient lighting, but it's still a problem. Why do you think high beaming is illegal in the city or near other cars? If it's only "in your face for a few secs" and doesn't mess with your night vision then why doesn't everyoen drive with HBs on.

If you're still confused about how HB-ing messes up your night vision, go look up why instruments are backlit certain colours like red to minimize messing with your eyes' night vision.

Also maybe this affects me more since I drive a coupe that's relatively low, so I might be directly in the HB's path more of the time than say an SUV driver.
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ToniCipriani wrote:
May 21st, 2015 3:32 pm
Solution's easy... I just get behind them and blast them in return with my HID fogs.
Wouldn't work well for me since my fogs are so damn close to the ground....I'd have to be so far back to have them shine in their rearview mirror that they wouldn't be all that bright.
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fred2028 wrote:
May 21st, 2015 4:45 pm
Clearly you have no understanding of night vision ... When you are driving in the dark and suddenly a bright-ass light shines into your eyes for a few seconds (depending on how flat the road is) and then it passes you don't have your night vision anymore for some time and makes it harder to see stuff in the dark. Cars, animals, pedestrians etc. are less likely to be seen. You can reproduce this by going into a dark room, shining a flashlight in your face, and then turning it off and looking around. Granted this isn't as big of a problem if there are street lights providing ambient lighting, but it's still a problem. Why do you think high beaming is illegal in the city or near other cars? If it's only "in your face for a few secs" and doesn't mess with your night vision then why doesn't everyoen drive with HBs on.

If you're still confused about how HB-ing messes up your night vision, go look up why instruments are backlit certain colours like red to minimize messing with your eyes' night vision.

Also maybe this affects me more since I drive a coupe that's relatively low, so I might be directly in the HB's path more of the time than say an SUV driver.
If your eyes can't adjust "enough" to properly see what's ahead...time to get your eyes checked out bud!
There's nothing I'm confused about, as I have had my share of "in your face" HB and have yet to drive off the road because I couldn't see for those several seconds!
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vkizzle wrote:
May 21st, 2015 4:54 pm
If your eyes can't adjust "enough" to properly see what's ahead...time to get your eyes checked out bud!
There's nothing I'm confused about, as I have had my share of "in your face" HB and have yet to drive off the road because I couldn't see for those several seconds!
I'm quite certain the majority of human eyes take time to adjust between varying levels of light. If you have superhuman vision then good for you and if more people had your vision then maybe we can get the no HB law reversed.

Not driving off the road just because someone HB-ed you isn't something to be proud of. I've never had an accident either but the fact that being HB-ed increases the risk and it's illegal is the reason why it's brought up.
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vkizzle wrote:
May 21st, 2015 4:54 pm
If your eyes can't adjust "enough" to properly see what's ahead...time to get your eyes checked out bud!
There's nothing I'm confused about, as I have had my share of "in your face" HB and have yet to drive off the road because I couldn't see for those several seconds!
Your pupils take longer to dilate than contract. The longer you're staring at the high beam, the longer it takes for your eyes to readjust after the car passes by. It might not feel like much because your eyes only took 1 second to contract (for example), and then gradually open up again over the next 4 seconds (for example). That's 4 seconds of significantly reduced vision that you don't really notice because of the gradual dilation, as well as your brain's ability to interpolate information from an otherwise poor image.

It's not about your eyes not adjusting "enough". It's about them not readjusting quickly enough to darkness after being blinded by a high beam. Next time you go to get your eyes checked, feel free to check your pupil reaction speeds. You might just find out that you're not superhuman. Or, for an easier test, have someone shine a flashlight in your face at night and measure how long it takes before you can see clearly again.
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board123 wrote:
May 21st, 2015 6:20 pm
Your pupils take longer to dilate than contract. The longer you're staring at the high beam, the longer it takes for your eyes to readjust after the car passes by. It might not feel like much because your eyes only took 1 second to contract (for example), and then gradually open up again over the next 4 seconds (for example). That's 4 seconds of significantly reduced vision that you don't really notice because of the gradual dilation, as well as your brain's ability to interpolate information from an otherwise poor image.

It's not about your eyes not adjusting "enough". It's about them not readjusting quickly enough to darkness after being blinded by a high beam. Next time you go to get your eyes checked, feel free to check your pupil reaction speeds. You might just find out that you're not superhuman. Or, for an easier test, have someone shine a flashlight in your face at night and measure how long it takes before you can see clearly again.
Thus why I stated, don't stare at the lights.
Yes, I've had my eyes checked and had the iodine drops and know exactly what happens.
All I'm saying is its not as bad as people are making it out to be...Provided you don't "stare" at the lights.
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vkizzle wrote:
May 21st, 2015 6:42 pm
Thus why I stated, don't stare at the lights.
Yes, I've had my eyes checked and had the iodine drops and know exactly what happens.
All I'm saying is its not as bad as people are making it out to be...Provided you don't "stare" at the lights.
Sometimes you don't have much of a choice. If you're sitting at a red light an the guy on the other side is blasting his high beams or HID fogs at you, your eyes will get affected whether you like it or not.

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