Cell Phones

Why are iPhones so much faster than even the fastest android phones?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 12th, 2017 12:27 am
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jdh799 wrote:
Sep 26th, 2017 9:16 am
Here's the thing though - that is only looking at the comparison in terms of the software integration. If you look at it in terms of feature availability, Android flagship phones tend to be significantly ahead of Apple phones.
- AMOLED displays - generally acknowledged to be superior to LCD - Samsung has been using them in flagships for what 5+ years now? Apple is finally jumping on that bandwagon with the iPhone X.
- Display resolution - Top Android phones have been running 2k resolution for years now, while Apple is still at 1080p on the iPhone 8 Plus, and only switching to higher resolution for X
- Wireless charging - It's been available since I think the S5 (maybe earlier) and only just being added to the iPhone this year S5 required a special backplate to make it work also proprietary
- Fast charging - Fast charging technologies have been on Android flagships for probably 5 years now, while iPhones have been limited to slow (often 3+ hours for a full charge) charging. They are only adding fast charge this year, and not even including the fast charge adapter in the box (it's proprietary and costs $80 more). QC 2.0 came out in 2015
- Facial/iris/etc. unlocking - Some form of this has been on most Androids for 5+ years, and Apple is only now getting on board (yes I know with a more advanced system). Note 7 brought IRIS but then recalled, but remember Apple brought Touch ID, Samsung struggled with fingerprint unlock for years, it only got fixed with the S6
- Modern/bezel design - Apple has used the same basic phone chassis since the iPhone 6 3 years ago. Meanwhile, Android phones have been getting slimmer and slimmer designs each year, and Apple is only now embracing that trend with the X. Apple is cautious and caters to the masses. Apple was the first to use premium materials, prior to the iPhone 2G, every potential smartphone was made of plastic. The 4 was the first to use glass. Innovation earlier in life led to few tumbles for Apple (Antenna Gate), and Tim prefers to stronger on the operational side, ergo, not one to jump on something new right away

So, you can easily argue that with flagship Androids, you actually get a lot more advanced design and feature sets than you do with Apple, plus more flexibility to customize the OS to meet your personal preferences. For example, if you look at an iPhone 8 Plus next to a Samsung S8+ or Note 8, the iPhone just looks embarrassingly dated.
I think you're stretching the truth here a lot, thus, its best to cite resources instead of falling prey to fallacies (ignorance).

Samsung continues to push designs and doesn't care really market test it, if it pans out, it does, if not, it gets axed.

Remember the Note Edge? Came out one year, out the next. Remember USB 3 on the Note 4, axed the year after, because people found the cable too obtrusive. and rather sacrifice data transfer speeds for micro usb convenience.

Plus the constant updates to a new bezel, slimmer design or rethinking the entire process leads to profits ($$$) for third party case makers.

You can call Apple being conservative or boring with their design, but people aren't likely to moan having to update their case again with a new revision every year.

Yes, display resolution was very conservative on the iPhones, but guess what iPhone users never complained about; battery life. Every AMOLED device, even though efficient in design, required a top up, two to three times a day.

Plus, people used to slam iPhone about lack of battery hotswaps, guess what Samsung did, no batteries swaps.

Samsung also tried to cash in on the fixed memory phone variants like Apple with the S6 and Note 5 line.

People moaned but that didn't stop Samsung sales, so they went back to the board again. Why even suggest it in the first place? $$$

At the end of the day, hardware is nice, but it comes down to usability. iOS just works, whether with quality apps or support later in the product cycle or not crashing due to lack of RAM on the phone.

TouchWiz used to be terrible on Samsung phones, and only became less obtrusive with the S7.

And if RAM didn't matter when you have hit 4 GBs and up, why is everyone in North America begging of the China Spec versions of the Galaxy phones for increased ram, like 6 and 8 GB variants?

Samsung pushes out products because it can at the moment. HTC was doing a lot better than Samsung when Apple started to pull ahead in the race. However, HTC lost its footing giving Samsung a chance.

Another example would be Android Wear. Apple has shown plenty of success with its iWatch. Coming out years after Android Wear. Yet, Samsung can be called archaic as it continues to push Tiezen on their smartwatches.
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Jul 30, 2017
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rebel_rfd wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 10:34 am
I think you're stretching the truth here a lot, thus, its best to cite resources instead of falling prey to fallacies (ignorance).

Samsung continues to push designs and doesn't care really market test it.

Remember the Note Edge? Came out one year, out the next.

Plus the constant updates to a new bezel, slimmer design or rethinking the entire process leads to profits ($$$) for third party case makers.

You can call Apple being conservative or boring with their design, but people aren't likely to moan having to update their case again with a new revision every year.

At the end of the day, hardware is nice, but it comes down to usability. iOS just works, whether with quality apps or support later in the product cycle or not crashing due to lack of RAM on the phone.

TouchWiz used to be terrible on Samsung phones, and only became less obtrusive with the S7.

And if RAM didn't matter when you have hit 4 GBs and up, why is everyone in North America begging of the China Spec versions of the Galaxy phones for increased ram, like 6 and 8 GB variants?

Samsung pushes out products because it can at the moment. HTC was doing a lot better than Samsung when Apple started to pull ahead in the race. However, HTC lost its footing giving Samsung a chance.

Another example would be Android Wear. Apple has shown plenty of success with its iWatch. Coming out years after Android Wear. Yet, Samsung can be called archaic as it continues to push Tiezen on their smartwatches.
The Edge/curved screen concept from the Note Edge was carried over to the S6 Edge 6 months later, and then rolled into all future flagships - the S7 Edge, Note 7, with curved/Edge screens becoming the only option with the S8/Note 8. I don't know how you can call that a concept that they abandoned; they just decided to only make one Note 5 model. Apple is still basically following/copying LG and Samsung in moving to a "bezel-less" design, because they had no choice. Android flagships have been reducing the size of the bezels for years now, making the iPhone 6 chassis design look more and more dated with every passing release. I don't know that the case design argument is even all that compelling; the 6/6S has a headphone jack, no second bottom firing speaker, and no second camera, so for a 6/6S case to be compatible with the 7, it needs to have massively oversized bottom and back cut outs. Many case manufacturers that tried to make a case that works with the 6/6S/7 made cases that have a camera cutout that is twice the needed size on the 6/6S, and a headphone jack cutout that is a big empty hole on the 7. The net result is just ugly; you're going to want a model specific case anyway.

Yes, pre-S7 TouchWiz was terrible, but you also have the option of just installing a third party launcher like Nova Launcher that lets you set up your interface exactly how you want it, and eliminates the problem altogether. The amount of customization you are allowed on iOS is pathetic in comparison, and makes iOS look like going back to using Windows 3.1 after switching to Windows 95. I also haven't noticed any significant difference in app quality and stability of major apps on iOS vs recent Android versions; most major apps run basically identically.
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jdh799 wrote:
Sep 27th, 2017 8:27 pm

iPhones have also needed fast charging for years now; when I was travelling over the summer with people carrying iPhones (even the smaller capacity non plus models) and our phones needed to be charged, my S7 Edge would charge to like 80% in an hour or less, while everyone that had iPhones only got like +30% charge in that time frame. It's not a gimmick when you can get home and your phone is low battery, and you can plug it in, get a shower and something to eat, and have it more than charged enough for the rest of the day by the time you're done. The iPhone charge options have been pretty terrible for years now, and a big reason I decided to dump Apple phones two upgrades ago. The battery sizes are also not all that far off; we are only talking about a 10-15% variance for flagship to flagship.

iPhone X - 2900 MaH
iPhone 8 Plus - 2700 MaH
Note 8 - 3300 MaH
LG v30 - 3300 MaH
*Comparing the regular iPhone 8 to the S8 is foolish, because of course a 2k-5.8 inch phone is going to need more battery than a 720p-4.7 inch phone. The size of the S8 is more comparable to the iPhone X.

I agree on the battery capacities, but which phone architecture doesn't chew up battery life? As far as I know, iPhones always held better battery life than an Android phone. I understand your anecdotal reference, but you need to provide other metrics. What capacity were the other iPhones drained down too, even after the top off, what were they down too at the end of the night?

As far as facial recognition, I strongly disagree with Apple's approach. There is absolutely nothing wrong with fingerprint scanning for unlocking phones, for Apple/Android/Samsung Pay, etc. The current generation of fingerprint scanners (the early ones like the iPhone 5S, etc were kind of wonky) on all phones are fast , reliable and just work. Samsung's attempt at fingerprint was pathetic until the S6 Edge. Every phone prior to that required exact placement on the scanner, a smidgen off to one side, it wouldn't recognize. Samsung is at least giving you the option of still using the fingerprint reader plus the extra options for facial/iris recognition, letting you choose whatever works best. LOL, have you seen the placement of the current fingerprint scanner for the S8 and Note 8? I would call that far from convenient.
That's a far more sensible approach than Apple's blunt force approach to forcing people to use the new facial recognition. That's a big mistake, especially for a first generation technology that is likely to have bugs and implementation issues. Even if it does have bugs, which it may, who is likely to push out updates and continue with support? If its a carrier branded phone and an update gets pushed, you'll have to wait for Rogers, Bell, Telus, or whoever to push the update after they get it from Samsung. And Samsung will "work" on it until the next revision of the S or Note series is launched. We already saw those issues when they couldn't even get it to work during their own demo. They should have left the fingerprint reader in; there's no reason they couldn't have made the Apple logo on the back of the phone a fingerprint sensor or something. Same could be said about Samsung, why didn't they place it in a more convenient location like the Pixel series?

The headphone jack removal is another example of Apple being arrogant and dropping the ball, while most Android manufacturers are holding off and giving customers what they want. This isn't like when they were the first to cut the floppy drive from desktop PCs - when they did that, there was little reason to use 3.5 inch floppies. With headphone jacks, the technology is anything but obsolete, and regular headphones are all over the place and still being used in significantly larger numbers than any wireless/bluetooth headphone technology. Not only that, but it isn't like wireless headphone technology is an across the board superior replacement for using the headphone jack; audiophiles still report that even the best Bluetooth headphones can not match the audio fidelity of wired headphones. It's absolutely foolish to take the headphone jack out when most people still want to use wired headphones, forcing people to carry that stupid dongle around, and lose the functionality of being able to charge their phone and listen to music at the same time.
Anyone that considers themselves an audiophile would never use a phone to playback their content.

Regardless, once again, you should cite sources or know what you referring too. Right now, APTX HD is the highest caliber of bluetooth streaming for audio. Guess which phone manufacturer supports it? Only LG at the moment, and how many folks do you know that chose an LG device over a Samsung?

Apple is forcing consumers to use an adapter or pick up a wireless headset. Guess what else they own? The Beats brand, which is highly flocked over by those that can't afford audiophile grade headsets. But Apple isn't pushing some meaningless product. Ever hear of the W1 chip from Apple? Pull out your Apple Earpods, and they are paired to your phone within 3 seconds or less. Try pairing the IconX from Samsung to their phones in less or same time? I tried, it doesn't work.

Apple might be peddling their Beats brand, but at the end of the day they are a business trying to pad their bottom line. Healthier profits let them push boundaries, albeit with a lot more precaution post-Jobs.
jdh799 wrote:
Sep 27th, 2017 8:43 pm
I mean - that's the story/excuse that Apple wants to use, but I am skeptical. Do you really think that a company of Apple's caliber wouldn't take precautions to make sure that a phone they were about to use to make a product demonstration to millions of people worldwide wasn't being interfered with backstage? I'd think that's kind of common sense 101, and it's more likely that the feature actually legitimately did fail. There's also video showing Craig wiping sweat off his face prior to trying the facial recognition again, suggesting that something as simple as sweating is enough to muck up the recognition (or at least that he was concerned it would). If it's really that sensitive, I can't see it going over very well; if beads of sweat mess with it, what happens when you decide not to shave for a few days, or switch from contacts to glasses, etc. Would be fine if they also left in a fingerprint scanner for backup, but leaving a first generation technology as the only biometric way of opening a phone is playing with fire.
You're really pulling here. Like I said, if that was the case, Apple will push out an update, or continue updating on their flagship phone, unlike Samsung who will drop an update, under duress, then fix it with the new hardware next year.
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Jul 30, 2017
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rebel_rfd wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 10:34 am


Yes, display resolution was very conservative on the iPhones, but guess what iPhone users never complained about; battery life. Every AMOLED device, even though efficient in design, required a top up, two to three times a day.

Plus, people used to slam iPhone about lack of battery hotswaps, guess what Samsung did, no batteries swaps.

Samsung also tried to cash in on the fixed memory phone variants like Apple with the S6 and Note 5 line.
AMOLED displays are more battery efficient than LCD displays, and the notion of "every AMOLED phone requiring 2 -3 charges a day" is nonsense. The iPhone 5S that I had had awful battery life and would literally need multiple charges per day. Lots of people that I know that have/had the smaller iPhone models have the same issue; they have significantly worse battery life than 3000+ mAH Android phones. The Plus iPhones do have solid battery life, especially standby time. Most battery life tests put Android flagships like the S8+, Note 8, OnePlus 5, Pixel XL, etc as having longer battery life for LTE/3G calling/video play back and general on screen time than the iPhone 7 Plus. Where the iPhones (at least the plus versions, the smaller versions are still crap) have a leg up is in the standby battery time. If you're barely using your phone, you can easily go a couple of days without charging an iPhone 6/7 Plus, while Android phones will still drain ~50% of your battery a day from just standby. Basically, the iPhone has better battery life for light usage, but will die faster if you want to push 4+ hours of screen on time; Android phones are much more efficient at heavy use, but won't last multiple days between charges if you're barely using them. As long as you charge your phone once a night, there is little practical difference between the two for most people.

Replaceable batteries were phased out because it's impossible to have a IP67 or IP68 water proofing with a replaceable battery, and because the availability of fast and wireless charging makes replaceable batteries less attractive. Yes, Samsung removed the SD card slot for the S6/Note 5 year, but listened to customers and added it back in the next year. Apple has always been content to gouge customers for more storage (since the baseline models typically don't have enough).
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jdh799 wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 10:53 am
The Edge/curved screen concept from the Note Edge was carried over to the S6 Edge 6 months later, and then rolled into all future flagships - the S7 Edge, Note 7, with curved/Edge screens becoming the only option with the S8/Note 8. I don't know how you can call that a concept that they abandoned; they just decided to only make one Note 5 model. Apple is still basically following/copying LG and Samsung in moving to a "bezel-less" design, because they had no choice. Android flagships have been reducing the size of the bezels for years now, making the iPhone 6 chassis design look more and more dated with every passing release. I don't know that the case design argument is even all that compelling; the 6/6S has a headphone jack, no second bottom firing speaker, and no second camera, so for a 6/6S case to be compatible with the 7, it needs to have massively oversized bottom and back cut outs. Many case manufacturers that tried to make a case that works with the 6/6S/7 made cases that have a camera cutout that is twice the needed size on the 6/6S, and a headphone jack cutout that is a big empty hole on the 7. The net result is just ugly; you're going to want a model specific case anyway.

Yes, pre-S7 TouchWiz was terrible, but you also have the option of just installing a third party launcher like Nova Launcher that lets you set up your interface exactly how you want it, and eliminates the problem altogether. The amount of customization you are allowed on iOS is pathetic in comparison, and makes iOS look like going back to using Windows 3.1 after switching to Windows 95. I also haven't noticed any significant difference in app quality and stability of major apps on iOS vs recent Android versions; most major apps run basically identically.
I'm not sure how you say Apple copied LG/Samsung's designs, when everything that followed from every manufacturer after the success of the iPhone 3G was a phone with rounded bezel.....

Apple even took Samsung to court over this:

Samsung, which was ruled to have violated Apple’s design patents by a jury in 2012, initially found itself on the hook for the profits generated by each of the 11 patents determined to have to been infringed. Effectively, the company would have had to pay Apple a percentage of each sale. The justices disagreed, ruling that the company only needed to pay damages on the infringing components of those smartphones, rather than the smartphones themselves.

You can disregard this if you want, but if you remember the Samsung Galaxy and all those phones before looked just like iPhones, along with the lack of app drawer. Samsung only started cutting down the bezel with the S7E. S6, S7 still had larger bezels.

Even with the curved screens? It looks "cool" but is it even practical?

You are unable to use tempered glass protector on it, so forced to use the adhesive or liquid applicator based protectors. And the cheaper ones are often riddled with clarity or orange peel issue.

How many users are actually using the slide from edge feature? When it launched on the S7 it was barely able to be customized, I understand its gotten better, but its not a smoother transition, moving your finger over a case/metal edge over the glass to utilize it.

Plus the cutoffs of the edge, or video wrapping around it when watching full-screen.

I've had the S7/Note 7, and other than the "cool aspect" of the edge screen, I don't think its practical, whether in use or in terms of being able to protect your phone for eventual resale.

And regarding using a third party installer, that's fine, it does get around the use of the crappy TouchWiz launcher. But what I liked about TouchWiz was My Magazine, using a build in Flipboard Widget on the far left swipe. Once you install Nova or any other launcher, it removes that My Magazine Widget.

In my time with Samsung phones, I was never able to replicate the far swipe to the left to get back My Magazine using a third party launcher.
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jdh799 wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 11:07 am
AMOLED displays are more battery efficient than LCD displays, and the notion of "every AMOLED phone requiring 2 -3 charges a day" is nonsense. The iPhone 5S that I had had awful battery life and would literally need multiple charges per day. Lots of people that I know that have/had the smaller iPhone models have the same issue; they have significantly worse battery life than 3000+ mAH Android phones. The Plus iPhones do have solid battery life, especially standby time. Most battery life tests put Android flagships like the S8+, Note 8, OnePlus 5, Pixel XL, etc as having longer battery life for LTE/3G calling/video play back and general on screen time than the iPhone 7 Plus. Where the iPhones (at least the plus versions, the smaller versions are still crap) have a leg up is in the standby battery time. If you're barely using your phone, you can easily go a couple of days without charging an iPhone 6/7 Plus, while Android phones will still drain ~50% of your battery a day from just standby. Basically, the iPhone has better battery life for light usage, but will die faster if you want to push 4+ hours of screen on time; Android phones are much more efficient at heavy use, but won't last multiple days between charges if you're barely using them. As long as you charge your phone once a night, there is little practical difference between the two for most people.

Replaceable batteries were phased out because it's impossible to have a IP67 or IP68 water proofing with a replaceable battery, and because the availability of fast and wireless charging makes replaceable batteries less attractive. Yes, Samsung removed the SD card slot for the S6/Note 5 year, but listened to customers and added it back in the next year. Apple has always been content to gouge customers for more storage (since the baseline models typically don't have enough).
But is it just Apple?

Look at the Google Nexus line, now Pixel phones.

Also built in memory, but no IP67/68 certification.

Google does it in an attempt to push their cloud service and Apple does the same.

The only benefit to external card slot was to be able to expand memory based on later needs in the life cycle of the phone. An additional benefit was to be able to pull the card out to transfer files out and in. But how many Samsung users have a USB 3 capable card reader?
I have one, but how many others? Also, Apple barely had a File Manager system in place prior to iOS 11, so why offer an expandable memory slot? I had the S6 Edge 128 Variant, and since Samsung wanted to go back to Micro USB with Quick Charge 2.0, it crippled the transfer speed.

I figured having 128 GB on internal would allow faster read and write to the storage, but it didn't because it was still on USB 2.0 speeds for data transfer with that Micro USB connector.

And even having expandable memory didn't really show its merit until Google offered the option to transfer App Install Directories onto the external card. They once did, then revoked it due to security with app permissions, and then placed it back after. Even reading off of the external mounted storage was slow for photos or videos using the built in Samsung File Manager.
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rebel_rfd wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 11:28 am
And even having expandable memory didn't really show its merit until Google offered the option to transfer App Install Directories onto the external card. They once did, then revoked it due to security with app permissions, and then placed it back after. Even reading off of the external mounted storage was slow for photos or videos using the built in Samsung File Manager.
That is not so for any Linux users. Pull out the card and practically all video and audio format can be read and duplicated.
Daniel

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danieltoronto wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 11:38 am
That is not so for any Linux users. Pull out the card and practically all video and audio format can be read and duplicated.
LoL, are we bringing Linux into this thread now?
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rebel_rfd wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 11:39 am
LoL, are we bringing Linux into this thread now?
Even with Window desktop/laptops, esp Window 7, sd card is still a versatile tool for phones and tablets
Daniel

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neverhaveiever wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 8:21 am
There is so much wrong in this post. It all feels like personal opinion and not based on facts at all.
Your welcome to specific what you think is wrong about it and provide references. If not your post is just an opinion on my facts.
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Mr_Dogg wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 3:31 pm
Your welcome to specific what you think is wrong about it and provide references. If not your post is just an opinion on my facts.
Your post was too full of garbage to even really bother. For example:
It makes it 100 times more useful. It allows for much more flexibility in its use while also being secure enough to trust it with important things such as Paying for things with it.
This is a loaded statement and simply not true. I realize you are exaggerating a little here, but you start going down the road of security...you lost me man. Apple literally just got hit with a zero-day keychain hack on OSX. Apple is not as secure as people think, and Apple Vs. Android speed has nothing to do with the security from the aspect of this thread.

Your post simply comes off as a fanboy, and none of it can really be taken seriously.

/rant
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6 Pages of Apple fanboy argument but no one points out why Apple is better than Android because:

1. Apple A11 series CPU outperforms any SoC produced by Qualcomm, Samsung, Huawei and Any ARM design. The big core of Apple is faster than ARM 73/75 by up to 50%
2. Apple App is much better designed as a lot of Android Apps are ported from Apple as Apple user are wealthier and willing to spend on Apps.(more revenue for developers)
3. Combined 1) and 2), Large Games runs much better in Apple and most application run much better in Apple. It's just a better platform in terms of App experience.

In result, the apple experience in using Apps/Games are much better than Android overall. I come from a PC background and I find Android UI more intuitive but my wife finds otherwise.

By the way, I used Nexus 6p and HTC m7, while both are considered one of the good better android in terms of experience, apps still falls a bit short compared to Apple.



I would still pick my next phone to be either HTC U11 plus or Pixel XL 2 because I think the premium of Apple over a little better of user experience isn't really worth it.
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Psychosocial aspect, if your friends are blue, it's hard to be green lol

Ease of use, if you're on a Mac, continuity means you can text to iOS, Android, flip-phones back and forth. Can PC's text Apple users? (maybe they can now, I don't know).

Apple also has the best resale, people just want them. Blacklist worries? Sell to a friend. I work with career professionals, if I said I'm selling my 7Plus, it wouldn't be hard. A lot of them don't care about the latest greatest but would happily upgrade their older iPhone off me, a trusted source. An easier sell/buy cycle makes upgrading easier.
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Hummmm,
let's throw some oil on the fire: iPhone 8 VS Note 8 speed test...


I'm not biased towards either btw but this is an interesting turn of events nonetheless...

Cheers,

Edit: fixed format
Last edited by Cress on Sep 28th, 2017 7:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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neverhaveiever wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 4:36 pm
Your post was too full of garbage to even really bother. For example:



This is a loaded statement and simply not true. I realize you are exaggerating a little here, but you start going down the road of security...you lost me man. Apple literally just got hit with a zero-day keychain hack on OSX. Apple is not as secure as people think, and Apple Vs. Android speed has nothing to do with the security from the aspect of this thread.

Your post simply comes off as a fanboy, and none of it can really be taken seriously.

/rant
What exactly does a zero day keychain hack on OS X have anything to do with Face ID? LOL
Samsung Note 7's blew up, does that mean you wont buy their fridges?

The fact still remains that Face ID is far ahead of Samsung's 'iris scanner' or Androids face 'recognition' implementation in terms of usefulness and security.

I think your post, attempting to discredit me by posting something completely irrlevant to the topic being discussed is what comes of as a silly fanboy.

How about perhaps you prove how Face ID is not secure? And talk to that merits? Or how Iris Scanning and Face Recognition on Android Is more secure?

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