Cell Phones

Why are iPhones so much faster than even the fastest android phones?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 12th, 2017 12:27 am
Newbie
Jul 30, 2017
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I suspect that synthetic mobile CPU benchmarks are skewed, because iPhones (or at least pre-X iPhones) cap out at 1080p, while top Android flagships are now using 1440p wide resolutions. That means that anything graphics driven is skewed, because the Android devices have over twice the pixels. You wouldn't run desktop CPU benchmarks comparing an i7 CPU on 1080p with a Ryzen CPU on 4k.

Also, generic benchmarks in general are totally irrelevant. What matters are real world benchmarks; how fast do your apps load, how fast do they reload when you switch back to them, and how stable and smoothly do they run? A lot of the real world benchmark videos are showing that while the iPhone 8 sometimes has an advantage in app load times, you also hit the RAM limitation more often, meaning that Safari tabs have to be reloaded when you switch to them or apps have to be completely reloaded when you switch back to them instead of it being a seamless process. You definitely see the benefit of 6+ GB of RAM on Android phones in a lot of the real world tests.
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jdh799 wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 11:04 pm
I suspect that synthetic mobile CPU benchmarks are skewed, because iPhones (or at least pre-X iPhones) cap out at 1080p, while top Android flagships are now using 1440p wide resolutions. That means that anything graphics driven is skewed, because the Android devices have over twice the pixels. You wouldn't run desktop CPU benchmarks comparing an i7 CPU on 1080p with a Ryzen CPU on 4k.

Also, generic benchmarks in general are totally irrelevant. What matters are real world benchmarks; how fast do your apps load, how fast do they reload when you switch back to them, and how stable and smoothly do they run? A lot of the real world benchmark videos are showing that while the iPhone 8 sometimes has an advantage in app load times, you also hit the RAM limitation more often, meaning that Safari tabs have to be reloaded when you switch to them or apps have to be completely reloaded when you switch back to them instead of it being a seamless process. You definitely see the benefit of 6+ GB of RAM on Android phones in a lot of the real world tests.
There are ones like one plus five is still in FHD.

Snapdragon 835 is no match to a11 and it is not even close to a9 for single core performance.

The difference is more obvious when it comes to gaming.
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Mr_Dogg wrote:
Sep 28th, 2017 10:24 pm
The fact still remains that Face ID is far ahead of Samsung's 'iris scanner' or Androids face 'recognition' implementation in terms of usefulness and security.
TouchID will be missed. I am using TouchID on my SE, and fingerprint/iris scanner/face recognition on my S8. Just imagining unlocking my S8 using face/iris would be painful. There are too many times I am not looking directly at the phone and I want to unlock it..
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taro-chan wrote:
Sep 29th, 2017 3:31 pm
TouchID will be missed. I am using TouchID on my SE, and fingerprint/iris scanner/face recognition on my S8. Just imagining unlocking my S8 using face/iris would be painful. There are too many times I am not looking directly at the phone and I want to unlock it..
No doubt they both have their advantages and disadvantages. I think the best part of it will be being able to use it in the cold with touch screen gloves or use Siri when your hands are dirty.
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taro-chan wrote:
Sep 29th, 2017 3:31 pm
TouchID will be missed. I am using TouchID on my SE, and fingerprint/iris scanner/face recognition on my S8. Just imagining unlocking my S8 using face/iris would be painful. There are too many times I am not looking directly at the phone and I want to unlock it..
I am the exact opposite. The apple both iPad and iPhone would not unlock 90% of the time using my finger scanner regardless of how may reset and retries. The iris scanner works 90% of the time on the S8 even in the dark. Side angles or direct sun can cause issues with it.

At one phone the iPhone finger scanner started to produce excessive heat and the phone would not power on screen was black. The button just kept getting hotter and hotter. I ended up reaching out to Apple and res instructed how to force a reboot. Seemed to resolve what ever happened. I was worried it would turn the apple into a Samsung bomb.

The iPhone often went into temperature protect mode while in my inner pocket during winter. Drove me nuts and completely drained the battery. I am hoping Samsung is better at winter temps as the apple was a bust. My old BB seemed to get through anything even being left out in -20 not in a pocket.

Overall the blackberry has been the most stable phone I have ever owned all software and BS a side.
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Apr 15, 2009
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It's amazing to me that nobody mentioned the first, original reason why. No developers in house?

The main reason for the huge performance hit between Android and iOS is that Android HAS to rely upon another virtual layer called the JVM (Java Virtual Machine) in order to execute Java bytecode into native C/C++ code the LLVM can then finally process into machine/binary code, whereas iOS code is already on Objective-C/Swift, it only has to pass that code onto the LLVM (which then churns out machine/binary code) so the middle man of the JVM is completely cut out, hence the speed bottleneck.
In layman terms, IOS talks to CPU directly, while Android goes through translation every time before reaching CPU. This will never change simply due to choice of programming language Google chose.
In addition IOS was build with touch in mind so User interface interaction has the highest priority in execution over anything else. Early androids ( not sure if and when did they catch up ) were build for a keyboard and quickly rebuilt to include UI. Hence, the execution sometimes had to wait for another process to complete. Of course these are all in milliseconds, but you do notice the difference when so many things are happening at once. ( refreshing the screen, running apps in background, talking to cell tower, wifi , bluetooth etc..)
IOS drops everything and dedicates itself to touch. ( very simplified)
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mstefa wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 10:13 pm
It's amazing to me that nobody mentioned the first, original reason why. No developers in house?

The main reason for the huge performance hit between Android and iOS is that Android HAS to rely upon another virtual layer called the JVM (Java Virtual Machine) in order to execute Java bytecode into native C/C++ code the LLVM can then finally process into machine/binary code, whereas iOS code is already on Objective-C/Swift, it only has to pass that code onto the LLVM (which then churns out machine/binary code) so the middle man of the JVM is completely cut out, hence the speed bottleneck.
In layman terms, IOS talks to CPU directly, while Android goes through translation every time before reaching CPU. This will never change simply due to choice of programming language Google chose.
In addition IOS was build with touch in mind so User interface interaction has the highest priority in execution over anything else. Early androids ( not sure if and when did they catch up ) were build for a keyboard and quickly rebuilt to include UI. Hence, the execution sometimes had to wait for another process to complete. Of course these are all in milliseconds, but you do notice the difference when so many things are happening at once. ( refreshing the screen, running apps in background, talking to cell tower, wifi , bluetooth etc..)
IOS drops everything and dedicates itself to touch. ( very simplified)
Google was looking to change that back in the day - Obviously its a huge change and may have to abondon lot of OLD to get to new architect but do you think in future they will?
PS: Garbage collection was another big thing Apple had since Day 1. Android was fairly manual for lot of years (they may have caught on now?)
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PrinceMS wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 10:18 pm
Google was looking to change that ... but do you think in future they will?
If they want Android to work on all kind of CPU's used with on all of the phones, they have to stick with Java. The only alternative is to create new version for each assembly for each CPU, no? and then imagine the maze of variants every year.
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mstefa wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 10:13 pm
It's amazing to me that nobody mentioned the first, original reason why. No developers in house?

The main reason for the huge performance hit between Android and iOS is that Android HAS to rely upon another virtual layer called the JVM (Java Virtual Machine) in order to execute Java bytecode into native C/C++ code the LLVM can then finally process into machine/binary code, whereas iOS code is already on Objective-C/Swift, it only has to pass that code onto the LLVM (which then churns out machine/binary code) so the middle man of the JVM is completely cut out, hence the speed bottleneck.
In layman terms, IOS talks to CPU directly, while Android goes through translation every time before reaching CPU. This will never change simply due to choice of programming language Google chose.
In addition IOS was build with touch in mind so User interface interaction has the highest priority in execution over anything else. Early androids ( not sure if and when did they catch up ) were build for a keyboard and quickly rebuilt to include UI. Hence, the execution sometimes had to wait for another process to complete. Of course these are all in milliseconds, but you do notice the difference when so many things are happening at once. ( refreshing the screen, running apps in background, talking to cell tower, wifi , bluetooth etc..)
IOS drops everything and dedicates itself to touch. ( very simplified)
While that is part is partially true.

Apple also has a huge lead in terms of SOC development.

They from the beginning decided to focus on single
Core speeds and revolved their design around the size of their single core and its performance. That’s why they have a huge lead in single core performance.

Everyone did not think much of it and just disregarded it this past years because the octacores has higher multi core scores than apples dual core.

Apple this year decided to scale it and we have 6 cores all of which are the best of the best.
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Gee wrote:
Sep 18th, 2017 7:51 am
Forget the benchmarks. Get the two phones side by side and load up an intensive web page or run an tidentical application. Use a stop watch if you want.

Only real world application matters.
I love to see a real test. I used to have 3 browsers with 30 tabs being opened in a 4 Gb ram low end Android. I can tell it runs fast
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danieltoronto wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 11:06 pm
I love to see a real test. I used to have 3 browsers with 30 tabs being opened in a 4 Gb ram low end Android. I can tell it runs fast
You’re in luck.

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I came to put in my 0.02 and saw EugW had already made the points on why iphones are faster.

Few other things to note/add are:

- how the iphones, ipads, and macbooks are converging in terms of hardware and we will see how that works out.
- Apple's R&D's massive budget has put em ahead by atleast a generation or two with the qualcom manufacturers and they are always going to be playing catchup.
- Apple is also utilizing other vendors to incorporate other technology within the scope of R&D for newer designs.
- Apple is a closed family for their iOS devices and can optimize exactly how they want their devices to work in conjunction with their hardware.


I use chrome on the ios device and i usually have 70+ tabs open, i think chrome works very well on ios and i have zero issues with speed or any lag.

I do wish apple would add support for choosing default apps.
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porksoda wrote:
Nov 2nd, 2017 1:45 pm
I came to put in my 0.02 and saw EugW had already made the points on why iphones are faster.

Few other things to note/add are:

- how the iphones, ipads, and macbooks are converging in terms of hardware and we will see how that works out.
- Apple's R&D's massive budget has put em ahead by atleast a generation or two with the qualcom manufacturers and they are always going to be playing catchup.
- Apple is also utilizing other vendors to incorporate other technology within the scope of R&D for newer designs.
- Apple is a closed family for their iOS devices and can optimize exactly how they want their devices to work in conjunction with their hardware.


I use chrome on the ios device and i usually have 70+ tabs open, i think chrome works very well on ios and i have zero issues with speed or any lag.

I do wish apple would add support for choosing default apps.
It seems like its coming. But will probably take another year or two :P
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Jan 29, 2013
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mstefa wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 10:13 pm
It's amazing to me that nobody mentioned the first, original reason why. No developers in house?

The main reason for the huge performance hit between Android and iOS is that Android HAS to rely upon another virtual layer called the JVM (Java Virtual Machine) in order to execute Java bytecode into native C/C++ code the LLVM can then finally process into machine/binary code, whereas iOS code is already on Objective-C/Swift, it only has to pass that code onto the LLVM (which then churns out machine/binary code) so the middle man of the JVM is completely cut out, hence the speed bottleneck.
While this was certainly a thing 15 years ago, I'm not sure it holds any practical relevance at this point. JREs have gotten far more optimized.
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mstefa wrote:
Nov 1st, 2017 10:24 pm
If they want Android to work on all kind of CPU's used with on all of the phones, they have to stick with Java. The only alternative is to create new version for each assembly for each CPU, no? and then imagine the maze of variants every year.
Yup. Plus Android multitasks more, and better.

But the main reason for the benchmark performance of the iPhone is that the processor is, for a mobile device, a monster. It has 40% more transistors than a processor like the Snapdragon 835. It also has faster memory.

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