Automotive

Why would used car lots rather keep the car for 3-6 months rather than sell it?

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  • Jul 1st, 2013 1:54 pm
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Dec 24, 2005
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Jim321 wrote:
Jun 30th, 2013 10:29 pm
1 - Honda Accords do not sit on lots for longer than 4 months, at the very very most. Happens all the time at the local Honda dealers.
2 - The car is still sitting there. Quite pathetic imo that they wouldn't sell for 350, and rather it sit there and rot, because the battery as I said was dead when he went to turn it on
3 - That's too bad then, could've offered 17,000 right on and sold it instead of pissing around and being firm at 17,250
4 - Extras? No extras were even discussed - the morons wouldn't sell it for 16,9 or even 17,0 so let it sit there. Maybe he would've bought the extended warranty/rustproof whatever, there was no mention of it during the sale, which is pretty bad on their part too.
these 4 points are moot because you're still car-less
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Read the thread. You'll see that I noted how my friend has a fully functional car but would like to upgrade.

And besides, he's already bought a new-er model, with same options, for cheaper, about same kilometers, and saved a good 1,000 off of it still. And the dealer's trust that he'll go there for service and everything.

Win-win? I think so, better than this POS thats been sitting for god knows how long in a warehouse somewhere until it was auctioned and these people got it, and still to this day is sitting there.
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Oct 22, 2007
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Jim321 wrote:
Jun 18th, 2013 9:37 pm
This does beg the bigger question, why, after 5 months, they are not in a rush to sell it, DESPITE the fact that it is depreciating, and clearly no one is interested in it (so far).
There's two groups of people that buy cars; those that _have_ to buy a car, and those that _want_ to buy a car. Your friend is obviously in the second group, and because of that, has the luxury of time to screw around and find the best deal that suits him. The dealership seems to be catering to the first group; people that need to pick up new wheels, and need them in the next week. This pool of buyers is always changing, and as such, the age of the car on the lot doesn't enter in the equation; those buyers won't have seen that car on the lot for x number of months. Those buyers won't care. Those buyers will buy on whether they think that car is 'the one'. If the dealer thinks the car is worth a specific amount, they know that eventually it will sell for that amount.
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Jan 30, 2013
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Ottomaddox wrote:
Jun 30th, 2013 11:20 pm
There's two groups of people that buy cars; those that _have_ to buy a car, and those that _want_ to buy a car. Your friend is obviously in the second group, and because of that, has the luxury of time to screw around and find the best deal that suits him. The dealership seems to be catering to the first group; people that need to pick up new wheels, and need them in the next week. This pool of buyers is always changing, and as such, the age of the car on the lot doesn't enter in the equation; those buyers won't have seen that car on the lot for x number of months. Those buyers won't care. Those buyers will buy on whether they think that car is 'the one'. If the dealer thinks the car is worth a specific amount, they know that eventually it will sell for that amount.
You nailed it squire.
mr_raider wrote:
Jul 24th, 2013 2:31 pm
I think the inner douchiness will come out and override cultural superstitions when comes time to sign the lease.
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Ottomaddox wrote:
Jun 30th, 2013 11:20 pm
There's two groups of people that buy cars; those that _have_ to buy a car, and those that _want_ to buy a car. Your friend is obviously in the second group, and because of that, has the luxury of time to screw around and find the best deal that suits him. The dealership seems to be catering to the first group; people that need to pick up new wheels, and need them in the next week. This pool of buyers is always changing, and as such, the age of the car on the lot doesn't enter in the equation; those buyers won't have seen that car on the lot for x number of months. Those buyers won't care. Those buyers will buy on whether they think that car is 'the one'. If the dealer thinks the car is worth a specific amount, they know that eventually it will sell for that amount.
Rightfully so - but when you look at the printed out CarProof and see that it was dated on January something, any observant person would raise an eyebrow - would make a lower offer than original because they would assume the dealer to be desperate knowing its been there for a while (discounting the fact that maybe it was in transit in the meanwhile from January to March lets say - still quite a time gap).
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Jim321 wrote:
Jul 1st, 2013 11:17 am
Rightfully so - but when you look at the printed out CarProof and see that it was dated on January something, any observant person would raise an eyebrow - would make a lower offer than original because they would assume the dealer to be desperate knowing its been there for a while (discounting the fact that maybe it was in transit in the meanwhile from January to March lets say - still quite a time gap).
You're still thinking like a the second group... I get it. You guys are gearheads, and you enjoy the process of finding a set of new wheels.
It's obvious to me who the dealer's target market it. That target market won't understand, or care about the Carproof date.

Frankly, I'm a little puzzled why you seem to have so much emotionally invested in this particular Accord.

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