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Why are you leaving your present company?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 20th, 2018 4:23 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 6, 2017
31 posts
6 upvotes

Why are you leaving your present company?

This is a frequently asked question and, apparently, speaking negatively about your present employer can affect your candidacy. How would you answer the question in a diplomatic manner if you are leaving a bad company/position? I've answered this question honestly by stating that the company is undergoing a lot of difficulties and there is no attempt to fix the downward trend hence my departure. I'm not overly negative or try to bash the company but I'm wondering if my answer may be rooting me out of the running for the jobs I'm applying to.

Would love to hear some diplomatic responses to the question
12 replies
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2017
921 posts
685 upvotes
There isn't room for growth with my current employer, and I'm ready to move on to a new challenge
Deal Addict
Sep 7, 2004
1464 posts
362 upvotes
Toronto
Keep your response professional if you must answer this question in the negative. Be factual, objective, not emotional and above all keep it short so that it doesn't involve follow up questions. What's not going right at your current company isn't the potential new company's business and this type of question only serves to trip up candidates to see how likely you are to throw your employer under the bus and leave when things don't go your way.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jul 29, 2005
7055 posts
1370 upvotes
Mississauga
You're looking for new opportunities and growth.
My food blog - Reggie The Food Critic.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 10, 2005
6024 posts
952 upvotes
Agree, new opportunities and growth.

Very important to stay positive when asked that question and never ever say anything negative about a previous employer.
________

"Talent gets you in the door. Character keeps you in the room."
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 6, 2017
31 posts
6 upvotes
thanks and thumbs up to all the responses.

New opportunities and growth - wouldn't that lead them to think that I'll move on again if I come across another opportunity for growth?
That I may not be a long term employee -just a nomad moving where the grass is greener?
Sr. Member
Jul 15, 2003
534 posts
111 upvotes
GTA, Ontario
Dealstalker2 wrote:
Jun 17th, 2018 10:07 pm
thanks and thumbs up to all the responses.

New opportunities and growth - wouldn't that lead them to think that I'll move on again if I come across another opportunity for growth?
That I may not be a long term employee -just a nomad moving where the grass is greener?
That is only true if your resume shows this trend. In theory, your employer should want you to do well and will do what they can to provide you with growth. If for example, you are aiming to be manager, but there is only one manager position, and it is filled, it is clear that you need to move on.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 10, 2005
6024 posts
952 upvotes
Dealstalker2 wrote:
Jun 17th, 2018 10:07 pm
thanks and thumbs up to all the responses.

New opportunities and growth - wouldn't that lead them to think that I'll move on again if I come across another opportunity for growth?
That I may not be a long term employee -just a nomad moving where the grass is greener?
Any hiring manager that looks down on the above is not worth working for anyway. You can tone down the "new opportunities and growth" statement by focusing more on your personal development and how that will be a potential benefit to your new department.
________

"Talent gets you in the door. Character keeps you in the room."
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 11, 2001
7886 posts
382 upvotes
I've been at my company for a lifetime it seems. But my GF is a habitual "job jumper"... between 2-4 yrs she'll be at another company. Not in any order but these are her reasons,

1. work life balance (aka dept reductions, additional workload)
2. ethics
3. remote work / work from home policies
4. change in management (for the worst of course)

That's about it, usually never or pay or poor bonus or anything like that.
...zzz...zzz...zzz...

www.heatware.com
Jr. Member
Mar 20, 2006
198 posts
15 upvotes
Speaking negatively never works. Generally companies take pride in certain things. I would find out what the new company likes to brag about (being innovative, creative, customer oriented, etc.) and use that. You are basically sharing the values with them and that would make you a better fit for them.
Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2010
3894 posts
797 upvotes
Toronto
Dealstalker2 wrote:
Jun 16th, 2018 9:16 pm
This is a frequently asked question and, apparently, speaking negatively about your present employer can affect your candidacy. How would you answer the question in a diplomatic manner if you are leaving a bad company/position? I've answered this question honestly by stating that the company is undergoing a lot of difficulties and there is no attempt to fix the downward trend hence my departure. I'm not overly negative or try to bash the company but I'm wondering if my answer may be rooting me out of the running for the jobs I'm applying to.

Would love to hear some diplomatic responses to the question
Turn it on its head and don't talk about your employer directly. Instead, flip those reasons around as to why the place you're applying to is better - a bright future with solid organizational growth that you want to be a part of, a strong leadership team that you want to learn from. That's better than saying your current company is going nowhere and no one knows how to fix it. The interviewer can infer that if they want, but you didn't say it.

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