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  • Dec 30th, 2017 8:03 pm
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Banned
Dec 22, 2017
12 posts
2 upvotes

Winter composting?

What do you guys do in the winter when it comes to composting? I try to do it in warmer months but am confused about how to got about it in the winter. I don't actually have a composter which maybe I should get, in the summer I throw everything in a pile and mix it up once in awhile but obviously can't do that now.
8 replies
Deal Fanatic
Jan 27, 2006
7100 posts
2100 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
It's kind of late now that the temperatures are freezing. But generally, you need to get a good compost pile going before it gets cold so that the composting action will produce enough heat to keep it from freezing solid. I've found that lots of sawdust and wood shavings work great to get a compost pile going. You can also throw in a horse manure from a local farm.
Deal Addict
Aug 30, 2011
2683 posts
623 upvotes
Ottawa
I compost year-round. Have 4 composters, and while it freezes for the winter, things get moving in the spring. I could use the green bin (and do for bones, paper towels, etc that I don't want in my bins) but like my trek to the backyard every day or two.
Deal Guru
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Mar 14, 2005
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City of Vancouver
Well, I guess if u have a compost pile, it's easier to get the guys to urinate on it, since that is good for the pile. Fall brings a lot of leaves, so a composter would have a lot of brown material. People have bagged leaves and then add them in slowly with green material.
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
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OttawaGardener wrote:
Dec 24th, 2017 8:00 pm
I compost year-round. Have 4 composters, and while it freezes for the winter, things get moving in the spring. I could use the green bin (and do for bones, paper towels, etc that I don't want in my bins) but like my trek to the backyard every day or two.
I have 3 composters, 2 Soil-Savers and 1 HOT FROG Dual Body Tumbling Composter. I use the latter during the spring summer and fall and the other 2 during the winter and they do freeze, but they start going again when it warms up. I don't use the latter during the winter as it doesn't compost well in the winter given the tumblers are off the ground so I don't bother. It does work faster than the soil-savers outside of winter.
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2010
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Becks wrote:
Dec 24th, 2017 10:51 pm
Well, I guess if u have a compost pile, it's easier to get the guys to urinate on it, since that is good for the pile. Fall brings a lot of leaves, so a composter would have a lot of brown material. People have bagged leaves and then add them in slowly with green material.
Urine attracts ticks, which can carry lime disease, so not a good idea.
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May 16, 2011
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Clarington
I personally do vermicomposting. Works particularly well for composting indoors and produces far superior nutrient rich garden material.

All you need is 2 rubbermaid bins, red wigglers (worms), newspaper and cardboard plus all your food scraps.
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Aug 30, 2011
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Ottawa
Bawler wrote:
Dec 29th, 2017 7:48 pm
I personally do vermicomposting. Works particularly well for composting indoors and produces far superior nutrient rich garden material.

All you need is 2 rubbermaid bins, red wigglers (worms), newspaper and cardboard plus all your food scraps.
I tried that but found I got fungus gnats or fruit flies. Also, our Labrador kept trying to eat the contents (he was quite ingenious about getting the lid off)
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May 16, 2011
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OttawaGardener wrote:
Dec 30th, 2017 6:23 pm
I tried that but found I got fungus gnats or fruit flies. Also, our Labrador kept trying to eat the contents (he was quite ingenious about getting the lid off)
Ideally you want them in an area where it is 15°C-16°C. Fruit flies don't thrive at those temperature but the worms do.

Dogs are always the wildcard - even with outdoor composts! :)

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