Wheels and Tires

Winters are here....increase the tire pressure folks....

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 4th, 2018 10:09 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 7, 2014
2400 posts
459 upvotes
Winnipeg

Winters are here....increase the tire pressure folks....

I run 32 or 33 psi in winters rather than recommended 30.
even if you don’t have dedicated winter tires, increasing air pressure in the all season tires by approx 3 psi seems to be good practice in colder temps...
cheers
url does not work ..you need to copy the full line below paste and remove the spaces
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp? remove this space techid=168

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech ... techid=168
33 replies
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 7, 2014
2400 posts
459 upvotes
Winnipeg
Here is the Text

WINTER / SNOW TIRE TECH: HIGHER TIRE PRESSURES FOR WINTER DRIVING

Several vehicle manufacturer's owner's manuals recommend operating winter tires several psi (typically 3-5) higher than their recommended pressures for summer and all-season tires. While none of them actually provide the reason why, there are several scenarios that would support the practice.

First and foremost is that winter tires feature more aggressive tread designs, softer tread compounds and are often molded with deeper beginning tread depths than summer or all-season tires. While the combination of these design elements allows winter tires to remain more pliable in sub-freezing temperatures to provide more traction in snow and on ice, it often results in tires that have somewhat reduced responsiveness to driver input. The 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressures increase tire stability and help offset the reduction in responsiveness.

Additionally ambient air temperatures in winter typically range 40- to 50-degrees Fahrenheit colder than typical summer temperatures for the same location. The lower ambient temperatures allow tires to be more efficient at radiating heat and the tires will run cooler, building up less hot tire pressure. In this case, the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced hot tire pressures resulting from less heat buildup.

And finally, all tire pressures are intended to be measured cold, which means when the tires are at the same temperature as the air outside. Unfortunately, unless you park your vehicle outside or in an unheated, detached garage, and measure its tire pressures first thing on dark, cold mornings, the influence of attached garages or higher ambient air temperatures later in the day often means that drivers are actually measuring tires that are not completely cold. In this case the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced tire pressures associated with the conditions in which the tire pressures are typically measured.
Deal Addict
Jun 14, 2008
2786 posts
1693 upvotes
Montreal
I run +3 all year long, makes the mushy handling a little better. But still switching between all season and winter is a major difference in feeling. +5 is a little too much on broken pavement though, your butt will feel every crack on the road.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 28, 2007
6199 posts
2559 upvotes
Alberta
I always run the recommended tire pressures on our vehicles. Whether summer or winter tires, we've never had any issues so I'm not going to change now.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 9, 2007
11581 posts
6406 upvotes
Think of the Childre…
So that means 35-37psi ....

WOULD SOMEBODY THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 7, 2004
4454 posts
1020 upvotes
GTEH!
Asker123 wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 11:51 am
Here is the Text

WINTER / SNOW TIRE TECH: HIGHER TIRE PRESSURES FOR WINTER DRIVING

Several vehicle manufacturer's owner's manuals recommend operating winter tires several psi (typically 3-5) higher than their recommended pressures for summer and all-season tires. While none of them actually provide the reason why, there are several scenarios that would support the practice.

First and foremost is that winter tires feature more aggressive tread designs, softer tread compounds and are often molded with deeper beginning tread depths than summer or all-season tires. While the combination of these design elements allows winter tires to remain more pliable in sub-freezing temperatures to provide more traction in snow and on ice, it often results in tires that have somewhat reduced responsiveness to driver input. The 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressures increase tire stability and help offset the reduction in responsiveness.

Additionally ambient air temperatures in winter typically range 40- to 50-degrees Fahrenheit colder than typical summer temperatures for the same location. The lower ambient temperatures allow tires to be more efficient at radiating heat and the tires will run cooler, building up less hot tire pressure. In this case, the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced hot tire pressures resulting from less heat buildup.

And finally, all tire pressures are intended to be measured cold, which means when the tires are at the same temperature as the air outside. Unfortunately, unless you park your vehicle outside or in an unheated, detached garage, and measure its tire pressures first thing on dark, cold mornings, the influence of attached garages or higher ambient air temperatures later in the day often means that drivers are actually measuring tires that are not completely cold. In this case the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced tire pressures associated with the conditions in which the tire pressures are typically measured.
I also run my tire pressure +3 PSI year round for both 3-season (no such thing as "All-season") and winter tires.
😎
Member
Nov 4, 2015
459 posts
228 upvotes
Ontario
Interesting... this is what my Mazda3 manual says:

Do not go faster than 120 km/h (75 mph) while driving with snow tires. Inflate snow tires 30 kPa (0.3 kgf/cm2, 4.3 psi) more than recommended on the tire pressure label (driver's door frame), but never more than the maximum cold-tire pressure shown on the tires.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
29542 posts
15397 upvotes
Ottawa
I follow the specs on the inside door sill.
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2006
4031 posts
1126 upvotes
Vancouver
Interesting... I seem to recall that for better traction on sand and in mud the off roaders let air out of their tires. I've been with Hummer (original v1) caravans where the drivers have adjusted their tire pressures lower on the fly to go over obstacles.

On the other hand, a few extra PSI may open up the sipes more on winter tires exposing more edges for grip.

.
Member
Jun 9, 2011
459 posts
224 upvotes
No sure about this recommendation, OP. If you were to wish better traction on ice, then you would have to deflate a bit (vs overinflate). In the end, probably simpler to just stick to manufacturer recommended pressure.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 26, 2007
5938 posts
1403 upvotes
???
NewsyL wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 2:51 pm
Interesting... I seem to recall that for better traction on sand and in mud the off roaders let air out of their tires. I've been with Hummer (original v1) caravans where the drivers have adjusted their tire pressures lower on the fly to go over obstacles.

On the other hand, a few extra PSI may open up the sipes more on winter tires exposing more edges for grip.

.
The reason for that is you want as much surface area available for grip. When driving on mud and sand there isn’t that grip under neath it, meaning ashphalt, where the grip is best for rubber based tires. Also low tire pressure in mud and sand reduce risk of puncture by sharp rocks or other off trail debris.

Also the narrower the tire is the easier it is to get stuck in mud and sand as it just ends up digging itself into a deeper hole.

In winter you want as narrow as possible to dig through snow to have rubber contacting the ashphalt. That’s why the high psi.

Also because cold temps can vary greatly and not everyone wants to check their tire temps in -20c, the ambient air temp effects the density of the air in the tire further reducing the psi when it gets colder and increasing psi when it gets hotter.

The 3 psi recommendation is to accommodate for that and increase the narrowness of the tire.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 26, 2007
5938 posts
1403 upvotes
???
The best winter tires are actually donut tires. Super narrow to cut through snow and get you traction. But sucks for braking on dry asphalt.
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
2668 posts
2662 upvotes
Vancouver
vaportech wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 3:13 pm
Also because cold temps can vary greatly and not everyone wants to check their tire temps in -20c, the ambient air temp effects the density of the air in the tire further reducing the psi when it gets colder and increasing psi when it gets hotter.

The 3 psi recommendation is to accommodate for that and increase the narrowness of the tire.
You misinterpret Tirerack's 2nd point. They are saying to increase the cold tire pressure because the tires don't build as much pressure as you drive in the winter. The decreased ambient temperature increases the amount of heat loss via radiation. Meaning that whatever heat is generated by the tire is radiated away more quickly than in the summer. This also means the tires don't see the same kind of pressure increase while driving in the winter as the do in the summer. That is what the extra cold pressure would account for.

q=εσA(Ts^4-Tsurr^4)
Deal Fanatic
Jun 26, 2007
5938 posts
1403 upvotes
???
derass wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 3:34 pm
You misinterpret Tirerack's 2nd point. They are saying to increase the cold tire pressure because the tires don't build as much pressure as you drive in the winter. The decreased ambient temperature increases the amount of heat loss via radiation. Meaning that whatever heat is generated by the tire is radiated away more quickly than in the summer. This also means the tires don't see the same kind of pressure increase while driving in the winter as the do in the summer. That is what the extra cold pressure would account for.

q=εσA(Ts^4-Tsurr^4)
I get that point. But honestly under inflated tire is worse than over inflated.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 8, 2005
4892 posts
822 upvotes
vaportech wrote:
Nov 10th, 2018 3:16 pm
The best winter tires are actually donut tires. Super narrow to cut through snow and get you traction. But sucks for braking on dry asphalt.
Urban myth.

Top