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a word of advice for picking college?

[OP]
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Mar 11, 2012
2 posts
EAST YORK

a word of advice for picking college?

which college is better between seneca, sheridan, humber, george brown and centennial?
i live in brampton.i dont have enough money as such to go for those universities :(

if i had to pick one then which would be it for an IT program? :)
9 replies
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Oct 3, 2010
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Aarrox wrote:
Mar 18th, 2012 8:28 am
which college is better between seneca, sheridan, humber, george brown and centennial?
i live in brampton.i dont have enough money as such to go for those universities :(

if i had to pick one then which would be it for an IT program? :)

I would either go to: Seneca or Sheridan then followed by Humber.
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 11, 2012
2 posts
EAST YORK
for sheridan which program should i go for when thinking in terms of employment and scope wise?

these are the few of programs they have:

1)Bachelor of Computing and Network Communications (Honours)–Telecommunications Technology

2)Computer Systems Technology - Software Development and Network Engineering Co-op

3)Bachelor of Applied Information Sciences - Information Systems Security
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Mar 6, 2015
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I just discovered a post in the past discussed my question. This post hosts information only.
cybercavalier wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 4:38 pm
how about colleges, between one out of five colleges in GTA: Centennial, George Brown, Humber, Sheridan, Seneca? Does it matter what school you attend?
Crichtonfan wrote:
Aug 12th, 2017 7:06 pm
I would say it only matters if the program is unique and has an industry connection / track record of getting placements for grads in program. Apart from that if you want to go to university aim for the program with clear bridge options.
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Go where they have a Co-Op program.
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Mar 18, 2015
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I would get a degree program if you want to go work abroad. Why limit yourself to the GTA? And tuition should be free at least for this year, even if next govt reverses the free grant stuff, so take on OSAP grants.

As for what program will get your a job? IT and software are self-driven careers regardless of school (except for Waterloo if we are talking Ontario schools, because of their intimate ties with employers). If you are not interested or passionate about the field or dont like dealing with new technology on a constant basis you are in for a grueling road to retirement.

That said, I have heard nice things about Sheridan and Seneca @York IT programs.
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Mar 6, 2015
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Crichtonfan wrote:
Aug 13th, 2017 11:39 am
I would get a degree program if you want to go work abroad. Why limit yourself to the GTA? And tuition should be free at least for this year, even if next govt reverses the free grant stuff, so take on OSAP grants. If you are not interested or passionate about the field or dont like dealing with new technology on a constant basis you are in for a grueling road to retirement. That said, I have heard nice things about Sheridan and Seneca @York IT programs.
Numerous RFDers' posts concur with Crichtonfan's idea for getting an undergraduate degree for working abroad.
bavarianboy wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2013 10:55 pm
In terms of professional careers.
I have a science degree, but I was able to pursue a professional accounting and risk designation. If it wasn't for a degree, I wouldn't be able to become a Professional Accountant or join professional societies.
Same as CFA, P.Eng, ... and MBA, JD need minimum degree, they don't accept diplomas. You need minimum a degree to do like RN or Pharmacist.
If diploma works for you then yah go for it. Journeymen Certificates i believe require a diploma or something.
If you want to work in professional trades, a diploma is good enough. (i think)
This is why a degree is better than two diplomas.
CalgaryExotics wrote:
Jan 4th, 2013 12:30 am
Fair enough. I understand what you are trying to say. It is then smarter for me to do the 2 year diploma, and then another 2 years to earn a degree. OR do a 2 year diploma and then transfer to a university level business program. Even though education is not a pre-requisite to be a car salesman I believe to be a successful one it is!
For engineering, working in the US and Europe at least means working abroad.
I want to ask Crichtonfan though. What do your words -- "the field" mean? Can I assume it is the IT and software fields or the career I am going into?
Last edited by cybercavalier on Aug 13th, 2017 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mar 18, 2015
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cybercavalier wrote:
Aug 13th, 2017 12:18 pm
Numerous RFDers' posts concur with Crichtonfan's idea for getting an undergraduate degree for working abroad. For engineering, working in the US and Europe at least means working abroad.
I want to ask Crichtonfan though. What do your words -- "the field" mean? Can I assume it is the IT and software fields or the career I am going into?
Well technically speaking you should be interested in any field you are persuing to make your life less miserable, but I find this more true in STEM especially engineering, IT and software careers.
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Aug 6, 2017
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Aarrox wrote:
Mar 18th, 2012 8:28 am
which college is better between seneca, sheridan, humber, george brown and centennial?
i live in brampton.i dont have enough money as such to go for those universities :(

if i had to pick one then which would be it for an IT program? :)
Do you know what specifically you want to do in IT? If it's something like web apps, Apple/android or full stack DEV then you might want to also consider places like Brainstation or lighthouse labs which have very specific programs. But only if you know specifically what you want. and if are short term job focused, they have high placement rates.

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