Careers

Working for the City of Toronto, ask me anything!

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 25th, 2019 10:51 am
Tags:
None
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 27, 2016
28 posts
32 upvotes
Toronto, ON
MasterPro wrote:
Oct 24th, 2016 6:21 pm
CityWorker wrote:
Jan 28th, 2016 10:55 am
I have been working with the City for a little while now, I know a lot of you are interested in knowing the benefits and work style of government versus private, feel free to ask me anything and I'll answer if I can!
You should improve your English in first
You need to improve your attitude, people are trying to help you give you actual advise, you are being quite defensive and it won't get you anywhere.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 27, 2016
28 posts
32 upvotes
Toronto, ON
What is the difference between provincial jobs vs municipal jobs vs federal jobs?
How and where do I get hired in the government sector such as what requirements are needed?
Potential hiring process, not sure with provincial and federal, but there is often an assessment, and an oral/written exam.
Deal Addict
Feb 14, 2016
1101 posts
443 upvotes
Is it easier to transfer from public sector to different department? (or is it easier to get a job for people who are already working for public sector?)

For instance, someone working for federal department, trying to get a job with municipality like Toronto?

Also, how important is French? because for federal its huge;
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 27, 2016
28 posts
32 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Valdes wrote:
Sep 12th, 2016 10:59 am
CityWorker wrote:
Jan 28th, 2016 2:23 pm
... every unionized person works hourly, only managment is paid by salary. Job performance monitoring is usually done regularly, its not very formal in that they just monitor your work throughout the year...
This isn't true, all levels of Canadian government have a group known as management/non-union (the / meaning OR). Public sector professionals (eg. Law, Engineering, IT, Finance) are typically part of this management/non-union group, which is usually segregated from union due to salary (eg. something like 60k+ salary you cannot be unionized). I think you should also clarify that your responses only pertain to your area of work; performance monitoring is definitely formal in many areas and KPIs are everywhere, even if you don't see them at your level.

Here's some questions of mine:
1. As a unionized employee, do you think that unions are beneficial or detrimental to the development/continuous improvement of city staff? Why?
2. Do you think that public sector unions benefit tax payers? If so, how?
3. If you had an opportunity to take an annual 15k salary increase at the expense of losing your unionized status, would you take it?
4. Have you worked with many other departments? Do you notice any differences between the behaviors of unionized vs non-unionized employees?
My apologies, I am just speaking in regards to the municipality of Toronto, as FAIK, non-union/management staff receiving a pay range that goes up each year until they hit the wall of their pay scale, most positions are managerial but not all are, in terms of role, not necessarily title.

1. Unions are good and bad for the exact same reason; job security. It's great when you have an issue with your superior the union will definitely help you, local 79/416 is one of the biggest and best for representation, a lot of co-workers who had grievances had their issues solved by the union. The downside, is workers who have been way too comfortable in their position and are clearly slacking and are not performing their job tasks up to standard. Those ones are who give government workers the bad rap. Management fears on dealing with these type of people directly because of the union, those people feel untouchable at times as a result.

2. I personally can't answer that, personally they probably don't in the short term, especially around labour negotiations, but long term where they help set employment standards and conditions, it's really important, especially for the private sector.

3. I probably would to be honest, I would definitely sacrifice some of my benefits for a pay increase; instead of getting 100%, I would take a cut to 75%-80% and a higher salary.

4. The only area which i've experienced non-union vs. union is in the division im in, and they are strictly managers and supervisors. I've never had any negative experiences in this division with non-union staff, so I can't answer this question accurately.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 27, 2016
28 posts
32 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Hindenburg1 wrote:
Oct 25th, 2016 9:58 am
I almost made it to a city of Toronto job recently. Passed my test, did the interview two weeks ago. I thought it went well. Questions were quite easy. I felt pretty comfortable with the guys interviewing me. But two weeks later I get an email saying sorry, you were unsuccessful. Not really any feedback or explanation given. Oh well, it was a 6 month contract with possibility for extension.

My question are:

- What's the deal with 35 hour work weeks? Do you really only work 7x5 per week. Or do you do the regular 40 hours and they just subtract the lunches?

- Is there a huge pension deduction like in federal government? I get anywhere from 8-10% deducted from my every paycheck for superannuation.

- are the pay increments yearly?

- How much room is there to move up? Some higher level positions have really insane salaries. I am assuming those are incredibly hard to get? What is the internal hiring process like?

- Do you need French at all at any level? I need French like fish needs water if I intend to make it anywhere decent in federal government
1. You work 8 hours and have an unpaid lunch. So in reality its 40 hours a week at work, but paid for 35.

2. Yes, i'd say on average I have about 10-12% if not more of your monthy pay deducted on that, the city matches it dollar for dollar.

3. You have 3 pay increment increases every year for the first 3 years of your employment until it caps out at your highest rate.

4. Getting into management is difficult at times if you are looking to stay in one particular division, most people move around which may make it easier in advancement. They look at your experience, education and training, but seniority is usually king of all.

5. On a municipal level, not so much. There aren't any positions that I have come across that 100% require French, however on a federal level that may be the case, can't say for sure though.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 27, 2016
28 posts
32 upvotes
Toronto, ON
JIB9022 wrote:
Oct 25th, 2016 10:56 am
Is it easier to transfer from public sector to different department? (or is it easier to get a job for people who are already working for public sector?)

For instance, someone working for federal department, trying to get a job with municipality like Toronto?

Also, how important is French? because for federal its huge;
I'm not sure how it weighs into the hiring process, I can assume it helps.

French, as I mentioned above, on a municipal level doesn't matter as much as it does on a federal level.
Jr. Member
Oct 15, 2008
171 posts
69 upvotes
Windsor
There are jobs in a municipality that do require French level fluency including some customer service positions, court reporters (some municipalities handle provincial offences in a court system), etc. Being a non union employee of a municipality, I would tend to think that, much like our unionized coworkers, our job is to support the municipality and those that we are here to serve. Whether we are union or not deals more with collective agreements and generally the levels at which you work in the organization, not how well we interact with our coworkers. If there are specific questions, I'll try to jump in and answer them (not to steal from OPs thunder, but I work in a different Ontario municipality in a non union environment, so we may see things differently).
Deal Addict
Feb 7, 2008
1525 posts
123 upvotes
Toronto
which bank does city of toronto use to payroll? do you have free group banking? like free premium credit card and accounts?
how much discount do you have on TTC?

thanks
Newbie
Apr 30, 2016
52 posts
6 upvotes
How often does the city de o interviews for the "ongoing positions"? I wanted to apply to one.

Does the city use a keyword software when screening resumes?

Does it matter how long my resume and cover letter is? I was told for public sector, make it as long as you need it to be, even if it is like 5 pages total?
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2010
1088 posts
343 upvotes
How much did you claimed for Viagra pills?
Member
Jul 22, 2015
267 posts
101 upvotes
Toronto, ON
When the city advertises for call centre emergency operators or call centre 311 agents, etc. They tend to always have a high demand of open positions (5,10,15+). Do they really hire that amount of operators? How do they have so many open positions, when these jobs tend to start at 60,000 a year. I'm so confused...
Sr. Member
Sep 6, 2016
679 posts
257 upvotes
Subway in Toronto is not working usually.

The Employment Centers only take money from Government to drink coffee.
WHen you start work more effectively?
To stop drink coffee an d start to work for people

You created many job place for yourself an go from one place to other everyday...
Public Mobile $35 / 4GB LTE a month forever!
Newbie
Nov 2, 2016
1 posts
1 upvote
CityWorker wrote:
Jan 28th, 2016 10:55 am
I have been working with the City for a little while now, I know a lot of you are interested in knowing the benefits and work style of government versus private, feel free to ask me anything and I'll answer if I can!
Hi there,

I currently work for a public employer that is very similar to the City of Toronto and am interested in transiting into a career with the City of Toronto.

My work is in a unionized HR position, where I excel but have little room for grow. I understand policies, legislation, union environments and I am someone who is interested in contributing, developing, learning and feel I would be a great fit for the city. I've applied for the temporary HR Assistant posting and have not heard back.

What I'd like to ask you is:
- Could you recommend a mentor or someone that I could approach about HR? I would greatly value a conversation about what makes a successful candidate/ try to understand more about HR at the City/see if my skills and abilities would be complimentary.

- Does the city have a temporary roaster of employees, which I could add my name to?
Last edited by Eva8381a on Nov 5th, 2016 10:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Feb 5, 2012
244 posts
38 upvotes
Toronto
dutchca wrote:
Jan 29th, 2016 10:05 am
CityWorker wrote:
Jan 28th, 2016 10:37 pm
1) Not really, depends on the job, but where I work its standard 8:30-4:30 M-F
2) Employer matches your contribution, its basically 10% of your gross pay every cheque
OMERs pension. For NRA65, 9% up to the YMPE & 14.6% over it. YMPE is the same as the CPP max, about $54,000.

NRA60 (Police/fire) 9.2% and 14.3%.
Wow those contribution rates are much higher than the Ontario Public Service.
OPB in OPS is 6.4% till YMPE and 9.5% beyond that.
Sr. Member
Sep 6, 2016
679 posts
257 upvotes
Now I know how OP can work for the City with bad English

To move papers from a table to a table the English does not matter :twisted:
Public Mobile $35 / 4GB LTE a month forever!

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)