Shopping Discussion

would you correct a cashier who "undercharged" you?

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  • Nov 13th, 2009 9:22 am
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Oct 16, 2008
576 posts
16 upvotes

would you correct a cashier who "undercharged" you?

There has been a lot of discussion about making sure you don't get overcharged, or shortchanged, or double charged at the cashier. Most of you will make a point of that to get it corrected and at least SCOP'd if applicable.

Well, what would you do if you found out the cashier undercharged you, or gave you more change, or even simple forgot to scan it and passed it through.

Would you go out of your way to point it out and make sure you get charged properly? Or would you keep quiet and walk away? Keep in mind that if the cashier undercharged you because of wrong UPC scan, or forgot to scan it, there would be no way of knowing which cashier made that mistake. If the cashier gave you more change, then her balance at the end of the day would be off, and then that would be a problem for her.

What would you do?

Let's also say that you found out after you left the cashier and was walking out the door, instead of at the moment of the mistake. Would you walk back to her and point out the error?

BE HONEST HERE>
I used to be me!
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May 5, 2005
13286 posts
11 upvotes
Toronto, Canada
Ultimately it's the multimillion dollar company's bottom line. I don't think a few cent or dollar will get a person fired unless they routinely do this. So to answer your question, no. I should note that when I receive my change, I do not do a thorough job of checking it so it's likely I get short changed rather than the other way around.

I may be dishonest in your eyes but I figure we all get 'screwed' from someone sometime in life so I'm just going along with the ride.

Would you steal if you couldn't get caught? Most would. That's why people download music and other things off the net because they think they wont' get caught.
Joe Zawinul
1932 - 2007
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Feb 25, 2004
5655 posts
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New Westminster
Yes, I would ...

a) being honest is the right thing to do

b) If I was a business owner and one of my employee paid somebody too much, would it be right to have that money returned? ... so I will

c) cashier could be required to makeup the shrinkage so it doesn't "hurt" the business, it hurts an individual

and probably for a few more reasons ...
Deal Addict
Dec 18, 2006
1946 posts
351 upvotes
Markham
CheapScotsman wrote:
Nov 9th, 2009 8:59 pm
Yes, I would ...

a) being honest is the right thing to do

b) If I was a business owner and one of my employee paid somebody too much, would it be right to have that money returned? ... so I will

c) cashier could be required to makeup the shrinkage so it doesn't "hurt" the business, it hurts an individual

and probably for a few more reasons ...
Yes, for the reasons above - especially the bold.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 25, 2006
5403 posts
679 upvotes
If you were intending to pay the tagged price, why should you then pay less for someone's mistake? Do you go to stores hoping they would undercharge you? Obviously not, so correct them and pay the price you intended to pay. When I've been under charged or more change was given, I always fixed it.

BTW, doesn't it pay for good karma? At least it makes you feel that much better :lol:
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
21292 posts
2115 upvotes
CheapScotsman wrote:
Nov 9th, 2009 8:59 pm

c) cashier could be required to makeup the shrinkage so it doesn't "hurt" the business, it hurts an individual
ESA violation.
Deal Expert
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Aug 18, 2005
18685 posts
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GTA West
If it's a cash purchase then I will DEFINITELY make sure it is corrected, otherwise the cashier will pay out of their pocket. And most likely I make more money than any cashier, even at Costco.

For credit card purchases, I've let those slide if they come in wrong because that won't unbalance their till. (However I guess the last time, Karma caught up with me? My Honeycrisp apples scanned as much cheaper Fuji apples, but then I accidentally dropped them in the parking lot when I was loading my car. I was picking bits of asphalt out of them after that. :mad: )
What if there were no hypothetical questions?
Deal Addict
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Sep 24, 2007
1970 posts
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Usually, I would correct them if it happens at the point of sale, and I wouldn't care if I just walked out the door. And, if I tell them and they don't happen to catch what I said the first time around and they don't ask me what I said, I don't bother repeating it.

Karmaic consequence? Of course. I went to No Frills to pick up three cases of water, cashier only punched in two, I told her I had "two other ones down here" (one was on the conveyor, two on a hand truck I took with me), and I went outside to secure it with a bungee cord. It snapped and snagged my fourth finger and turned it into a bloody scab.
Sr. Member
Jun 8, 2007
967 posts
229 upvotes
Mississauga
CheapScotsman wrote:
Nov 9th, 2009 8:59 pm
Yes, I would ...

c) cashier could be required to makeup the shrinkage so it doesn't "hurt" the business, it hurts an individual
If a cashier forgets or doesn't scan an item, how is the business going to know that employee X did it? If they're short money, that's trackable. If inventory numbers are off, they don't know who made the mistake, whether an item scanned incorrectly, if someone stole the item, or who is to blame.
Sr. Member
Aug 9, 2005
979 posts
6 upvotes
SeeYouNextTime wrote:
Nov 9th, 2009 8:00 pm
There has been a lot of discussion about making sure you don't get overcharged, or shortchanged, or double charged at the cashier. Most of you will make a point of that to get it corrected and at least SCOP'd if applicable.

Well, what would you do if you found out the cashier undercharged you, or gave you more change, or even simple forgot to scan it and passed it through.

Would you go out of your way to point it out and make sure you get charged properly? Or would you keep quiet and walk away? Keep in mind that if the cashier undercharged you because of wrong UPC scan, or forgot to scan it, there would be no way of knowing which cashier made that mistake. If the cashier gave you more change, then her balance at the end of the day would be off, and then that would be a problem for her.

What would you do?

Let's also say that you found out after you left the cashier and was walking out the door, instead of at the moment of the mistake. Would you walk back to her and point out the error?

BE HONEST HERE>
Yes, of course. I have and I do.

It's not about making a problem for her or not. And it's not about what people would do to you. (God knows, most people would chalk it up to a "good day" and run.) The whole point is, at the end of the day, I'm not a thief.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Oct 16, 2008
576 posts
16 upvotes
It's good to see that most people see the problems and try to be honest and try to fix it. :razz: But saying is one thing, doing is another.



NOw a wrinkle into the scenario:

what if the cashier was rude to you and gave you a hard time at the till? What would you do?

Also, what if the difference was not just a mere buck or two, but a substantial amount, say $20 or say $50 or even more?

What if you were short on money that week and needed it for rent?

What if it was the most evil empire of a corporation that this happened to?
I used to be me!
Sr. Member
Oct 20, 2004
825 posts
61 upvotes
Coquitlam
I've been in this situation and I did correct the cashier. This past August I was in Edmonton doing some shopping and picked up two sweaters at Pusch, each was about $85.

I went to the cashier to ring it up and he told me the total was about $89.25 after tax. I was sure they weren't on sale, so I asked him if that was correct. He looked at his screen and said yes, $89.25. I looked kinda surprised and said OK, took out my credit card and gave it to him. I then asked him if he scanned both sweaters since I was sure he was wrong. He looked again and realized his mistake, scanned the other sweater, and the total was now around $160.

The way I look at it...my morals are worth more than $85.
Deal Guru
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Aug 20, 2005
10453 posts
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Nowhere
Whether the cashier was rude or not, I would point out the error probably more out of habit than anything else. However if the cashier was really rude and not listening, I wouldn't push the matter if it worked in my favour.

I was buying two curtain panels at Canadian Tire and they scanned wrong. I invoked SCOP. The cashier didn't have a clue about SCOP. So I pointed out the sign at her register and explained to her that I was entitled to $10 off the first item. It took over twenty minutes for her to confirm the price and then ring them in. She kept coming up with excuses and was rude about it. I explained SCOP over and over to her, her supervisor etc. each time saying I was only entitled to $10 off the first item. She rang both items in for $10 off. I told her again that it was $10 off the first one only but she ignored me so I let it go. I could only tell her so many times and I figured the extra $10 made up for my wasted time and frustration plus there was a long lineup waiting.
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May 11, 2008
9421 posts
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If you'll do it when you've been overcharged, then by principle you should do it when you get charged too little. I've done both on several occasions.

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