Ongoing Deal Discussion

[Always] WOW ---- New and used cars from US up to 30% cheaper - Read post #1

Poll: Are Canadian cars overpriced

  • Total votes: 335. You have voted on this poll.
I have no voice, Canadian Dealers/Manufacturers are taking advantage of the Canadian consumer
 
112
33%
In most cases, new cars purchased in the US are almost always thousands cheaper
 
149
44%
I owe no one a living, competition is good. Thank you NAFTA!
 
61
18%
With the exchange rate factored in, Canadian prices are roughly the same
 
6
2%
With the exchange rate and financing, Canadian prices are cheaper - Buy Canadian!
 
7
2%

Poll ended at Dec 28th, 2006 1:46 pm

Deal Guru
User avatar
Nov 18, 2005
10810 posts
2150 upvotes
Kingston
sienna owner wrote:
Aug 6th, 2013 12:01 pm
because i did so for my 2008 Sienna (actually i had ordered mine to be built), and with chatting with some dealers, i could do the same now.
Could you provide details of which dealers you're chatting with. Seems like most people get rejected so it would be great to know which Toyota dealers will sell to Canadians. Thanks.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 13, 2002
5707 posts
198 upvotes
We should really just ask our politicians to make this process simpler, i think a political party could run on that entirely in a province like Ontario and win.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 9, 2007
1774 posts
88 upvotes
Mississauga
5abi wrote:
Jul 31st, 2013 6:43 pm
can anyone answer one question for me please? can i have someone (canadian as well) go to the states on my behalf and buy a car for me? i just want to know if they have to buy it and register it under their name and then i would buy it back from him and register with canada when he drives it back or what? he doesnt want any tax implications for him buying under his name and then selling it to me. would he be able to buy it and register it in usa under my name without me being there? when he comes across the border would that be an issue? do i need to go to the border as well or can i do the inspection and get it registered with insruance company after wards myself? thanks
Title is going to be transferred to whoever picks up the vehicle, as it would needs to be signed. Then, you and the vehicle technically have no connection what so ever. HST will be paid on import and then again during ownership transfer unless exempt.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 15, 2005
5291 posts
873 upvotes
mavericknm wrote:
Aug 8th, 2013 5:49 pm
I'm moving to vermont soon. I have a Canadian driver's license. I will have a Vermont residency address. Will I be allowed to buy a new car? Looking on the Vermont DMV registration form, it looks like I need a vermont driver's license. http://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/ ... le_App.pdf
Will this stop me?
Don't know about Vermont, but in Oregon, the dealer is the only one who can title a new vehicle. They will only sell to someone with a US license and will register and title in the US. Since WA is across the river from Portland, the dealer handles the registration for both states. My Toyota dealership would not let go of the MCO for any reason. Oregon also takes up to 6 weeks to receive the title. YMMV in Vermont, of course.
↑, ↑, ↓, ↓, ←, →, ←, →, B, A, START

There are no apostrophes in plurals! "I have 1000 posts" = correct. "I have 1000 post's" = incorrect!
Could've, would've, should've. It's simple English, people!
Voila: French, meaning "There it is!" or "Look!" Viola: A medium-sized stringed instrument Wala: An island of Vanuatu.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 13, 2008
1542 posts
273 upvotes
Monsieurmaggot wrote:
Jun 30th, 2006 2:00 pm
11) Are there any drawbacks from having a US car?

- Generally no. There are some inconveniences such as having an odometer in miles rather than kilometers and having the 'principal' display (outer ring) in the speedometer in MPH rather than KPH. It may be more difficult to resell an 'US' vehicle and you may get less for it. Dealer supplied bonuses (e.g. free oil changes for the first year) are usually not valid in Canada. Some automatic climate control and computer data information can also be in Imperial measurements. Some vehicles can easily switch between Imperial and Metric measurements while others cannot.
This kills it for me, unfortunately. I'm willing to spend the extra $1800 on a Canadian Accord 2013 instead of an American for those conveniences/benefits.
Member
User avatar
Sep 7, 2009
236 posts
34 upvotes
saffant wrote:
Aug 20th, 2013 12:24 am
This kills it for me, unfortunately. I'm willing to spend the extra $1800 on a Canadian Accord 2013 instead of an American for those conveniences/benefits.
I'd be surprized if the price difference was that low, but hey, maybe Honda has completed revamped their pricing.

I wouldn't be overly concerned with the imperial/metric units piece, as most vehicles have a decent solution. (Odometer is the only thing that typically remains in miles, but is really a non-factor.)

I think the biggest factor is actually the block that Honda puts in place: no warranty. There are better candidate vehicles for import.
Member
User avatar
Mar 2, 2010
428 posts
37 upvotes
Are there dealers or brokers who would have pre-negotiated prices, do everything and bring the car over? I am looking for brand new Honday Odyssey or Toyota Sienna. I am hoping that Honda's price is further reduced as there is no warranty. Has anyone dealt with a company that will take care of things regarding this in GTA?
Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
4576 posts
742 upvotes
Ottawa
mavericknm wrote:
Aug 8th, 2013 5:49 pm
I'm moving to vermont soon. I have a Canadian driver's license. I will have a Vermont residency address. Will I be allowed to buy a new car? Looking on the Vermont DMV registration form, it looks like I need a vermont driver's license. http://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/ ... le_App.pdf
Will this stop me?
I'd contact the VT DMV and ask them. The form specifies VT DL and I don't know if it's changed in the past year but I registered a vehicle in VT last fall using my ONT DL.
Member
User avatar
Sep 7, 2009
236 posts
34 upvotes
I thought I'd do a quick recap for those new to this forum, and new to importing cars. This thread is very long, but your best bet is to read the first post by M. Maggot, and visit his website. In addition, be sure to check out the Registrar of Imported Vehicles as this is THE source of information: www.riv.ca. After that, assuming you can't find what you need, feel free to post here.

I decided to post this update because some friends of mine were told more lies by a Canadian dealership. It's obvious that these tactics continue, sadly, so I thought I'd take some time clear up some myths. Again, most of these are covered in this crazy long thread (and on M. Maggot's site), but may be hard to find...


Myth 1 - I heard that manufacturer X does not allow their cars to be imported. (This is the one I hard from my friends recently.)
The vehicle manufacturer does not determine which cars can and cannot be imported to Canada. The Canadian government does (Transport Canada). Pretty much all major manufacturers' vehicles can be imported.


Myth 2 - I spoke to a dealership and they told me I'd have to: replace my bumpers/replace my airbags/swap out my gauge cluster/throw salt over my shoulder and spin 3 times before I could import a vehicle.
There are 3 main things in terms of safety and regulation that imported cars need to be checked against: daytime running lights (must be available, and can't be disabled), child seat anchors, and anti-theft devices (specifically an immobilizer). Most modern US cars these days have all of these, even the daytime running lights (DRL). One catch is that sometimes the DRL can be disabled on US cars, but this can be fixed by getting a US dealer to apply Canadian settings/firmware etc (for free, as part of your deal). You'll want to check the list of admissibility by vehicle make/model/year at www.riv.ca, which now sends you straight to Transport Canada. This will hint if anything in particular needs to be modified.

If you remember nothing else from this post, just know that Canadian dealers will tell you tons of lies about what modifications are required. With most modern cars, NO modifications at all are necessary. Zero. None.


Myth 3 - You didn't mention the Odometer/Speedometer. I have to get that changed, right?
There is a requirement to have km/h displayed somewhere, and that is one of the things that will be checked at the Canadian Tire Inspection. (Don't know what this inspection is? Check the RIV website.) However, most vehicles have the ability to display both - either through multiple numbers on the same gauge, or an alternate digital display. Even if by some fluke you had no means of displaying km/h, you can actually have km/h stickers applied to your gauge (UGLY!!), although I've never heard of anyone needing to do that. Regarding the odometer conversion, that is not required - can remain in miles, and it often will. However, there is no need to swap out your gauge cluster.

But, "my dealer said I'd have to swap out the gauge cluster or I wouldn't get a warranty in Canada."
This is a completely separate issue, and has nothing to do with the legality of importing a vehicle. Not sure if it still occurs, but BMW was forcing US vehicle importers to get their gauge cluster swapped out (sounds expensive) in order to qualify for warranty. This isn't a legal requirement, but rather a BLOCK that BMW Canada is doing in order to make importing vehicles less attractive. Legally speaking, if you don't care about BMW's warranty, you can still import the vehicle, go through the RIV steps (and Canadian Tire inspection) and you're done.

Alternate BLOCKS that I'm aware of are: Honda & Acura not honouring the warranty on any imported vehicles, Toyota preventing US dealerships from selling new cars to Canadians, and GMC requiring you to wait 6 months/20K kms before you can get warranty work done. Again, this has nothing to do with law, but rather is the automobile manufacturer's way of trying to protect their higher Canadian prices.


Myth 4 - I need a "Letter of Compliance" from the automobile manufacturer. (They're charging me hundreds of dollars for this!)
This is another example of a BLOCK by the automobile manufacturers, but thankfully it is a myth. Yes, as per the RIV, you do need to confirm that there are no outstanding recalls on the vehicle you are importing, and often importers would contact the manufacturer's head office to get that letter. The manufacturers caught on, and started charging crazy prices for this as a BLOCK. Or, in the case of Volvo, they'll ask that you get an "inspection" (for no reason, since Volvos need no modifications) for several hundred dollars before they'll issue the letter.

Again, thankfully this is a myth because the RIV will ALSO accept a printout from a dealership's service database confirming no recalls are outstanding. So, you need only ask your US dealership to print this out for you, and you'll save hundreds of dollars.


Hope this helps a bit. I'm a Volvo specialist, so feel free to PM me if you need specific advice. There are a lot of Subaru guys here, and generally someone has tried most major vehicles. Good luck, and please update this thread with your import experience.
Member
User avatar
Nov 30, 2009
300 posts
21 upvotes
Ottawa
n2d2 wrote:
Aug 22nd, 2013 11:35 pm
Are there dealers or brokers who would have pre-negotiated prices, do everything and bring the car over? I am looking for brand new Honday Odyssey or Toyota Sienna. I am hoping that Honda's price is further reduced as there is no warranty. Has anyone dealt with a company that will take care of things regarding this in GTA?
Both of these vehicles are good candidates for import. I used to import them all the time when I owned LP Auto in Vancouver, although I have sold my shares in the business and relocated to Ontario I can assure you they can still help you import a new vehicle and transport it to you directly or to the US border nearest you. www.LPauto.ca is the web address. Check em out, many people on this forum have used LP and can attest to the efficiency. Hope this helps!
Banned
User avatar
May 24, 2008
647 posts
722 upvotes
Is Subaru USA allowing dealers to sell to Canadians, or am I restricted to the used market? Can you still save $8000 on an Outback or has Subaru Canada narrowed the gap?
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2012
1402 posts
191 upvotes
Any inifiniti dealerships bordering Ontario/Quebec recommended to deal with Canadians?

Not sure if anyone else has done it, but I understand if you bring it in as a new immigrant landing all taxes/duties are waived?
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2012
1402 posts
191 upvotes
Anonymouse wrote:
Aug 31st, 2013 8:33 pm
Is Subaru USA allowing dealers to sell to Canadians, or am I restricted to the used market? Can you still save $8000 on an Outback or has Subaru Canada narrowed the gap?
Suburu is one of the few that will sell new
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2012
1402 posts
191 upvotes
joejack wrote:
Aug 6th, 2013 11:52 am
I went through a similar situation back in 2000 when I moved from the states and again in 2005 when my parents moved. In each situation, my research indicated that I should have bought the car at least six months in advance of my moving plans to show (to customs) that my purchase was not to escape taxes, but had a real use and intent to use in the USA. This was not limited to the car, but any and all (assuming large $) items.

Hope this helps.
There is no 6 month requirement for a completely new resident. It just states you have to have owned the car at the point of landing ,and driven it for a distance prior to bring it across. So you could land at YYZ with the VIN on your B4 good to follow list, and then go collect it and drive it into Canada. That is what I am looking to do.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)