Ongoing Deal Discussion

[Always] WOW ---- New and used cars from US up to 30% cheaper - Read post #1

Poll: Are Canadian cars overpriced

  • Total votes: 335. You have voted on this poll.
I have no voice, Canadian Dealers/Manufacturers are taking advantage of the Canadian consumer
 
112
33%
In most cases, new cars purchased in the US are almost always thousands cheaper
 
149
44%
I owe no one a living, competition is good. Thank you NAFTA!
 
61
18%
With the exchange rate factored in, Canadian prices are roughly the same
 
6
2%
With the exchange rate and financing, Canadian prices are cheaper - Buy Canadian!
 
7
2%

Poll ended at Dec 28th, 2006 1:46 pm

Member
User avatar
Nov 13, 2009
456 posts
79 upvotes
Somewhere N of 49th …
ValenP wrote:
Apr 24th, 2018 4:18 pm
I might be missing something here :)

Thanks michelb for considerations. With all of that seems the only option I have is to use broker who will deliver car directly from California to Canada (which means more money spent again).

BTW, at the end I've decided to drop it all since dealer in California couldn't provide more incentives while Canadian added some rebates so at the end getting car in Canada would become $700 cheaper than from California (with transportation and other fees included). No miracles here :)
More than $700 cheaper..a whole lot more. Most states, and most all of Canada, have a set of regulations in place for emission standards on vehicles. However states such as California, New York, New Jersey along with 10 other states as well as DC have adopted the California emissions standards, which are very strict and include provisions in the computer programming, fuel mileage and parts, which can get more expensive. Unless I was living in 1 of those states, I would not buy a new vehicle from there, and would look very closely at any used vehicle coming from there. Also don't forget, you can get a broker to get the car up here, but it's your due diligence to make sure that car can legally be brought into Canada (although some brokers are helpful) AND you must pay the fee/ register/ have the car inspected for Register of Imported Vehicles.
Member
User avatar
Nov 13, 2009
456 posts
79 upvotes
Somewhere N of 49th …
michelb wrote:
Apr 23rd, 2018 11:52 am
If by exemption you mean "CA tax exemption on a car bought in CA but shipped out of state", it's not quite simple because you'll likely need a temporary plate to drive the car once you receive it wherever you are getting it shipped to. I don't believe you can get one from whichever state you are receiving in (e.g. NY will only give you a temp permit if the car is coming into NY or leaving NY (or staying in NY) but they won't issue one for transit). I know that Ontario will not give you a temporary permit until the vehicle is in Canada so that doesn't help (not sure about other provinces but I suspect they are the same). Technically, you need to get a temp permit from CA which means paying CA taxes.

If it was me, I'd probably just stick a plate on it from my current car just to get it into Ontario (but that is illegal and you could get a fine for driving unregistered vehicle (I tend to think that if you have insurance on the vehicle and show them proof that you just bought it and are in the process of getting it properly plated, they might give you a break but it is breaking the law). In theory, you'd probably be better "more legal" driving with insurance and no plates at all but in reality, I think you'll attract less attention by having a plate from another vehicle. To do it completely legally, you could certainly rent a dolly or flatbed and tow the vehicle to Canada.

As far as the process, it's really not that complicated but you do have to do your homework. The thread is a few years old but the information still applies so read the first post. The only thing that's really changed is the US Customs Export process (AES) - easiest thing for that is find a company to submit it for you (I think you should be able to find it for $30-$50). www.riv.ca has most of the information.

It's true that some vehicles are not admissible to Canada but I think it's the minority (offhand I can only think of Tesla, some exotics and rare models that can't be imported). Having said that, many cars do require some modifications (e.g. DRLs, child seat anchors, etc). Warranties are entirely different and you really have to look at each manufacturer but the warranty will become void for many manufacturers.
Also do not forget the EIS update between Sept 07-Jan 09..those cars that did not have Electronic Immobilization System in place, needed that done as well, and if you brought in a Mercedes or a few other makes/models, all modifications have to be done at 1 of their dealers.
And yes he could get a trip permit in California to drive it home:
25.010 One Trip Permit (CVC §4003)

A One Trip Permit (REG 402) is available from the department and may be used in lieu of California registration for movement of any vehicle except a crane.

The permit must be posted on the windshield or other prominent place and must identify the vehicle being moved.
The permit must be obtained prior to any movement of the vehicle that would require it to be registered.
The permit is valid for movement of an unladen vehicle for one continuous trip from a place:
within California to another place within or outside of California.
Proper proof of insurance must be provided.
Newbie
Jun 27, 2018
1 posts
1 upvote
I found the listing I’ve been looking for months but it’s a New York registered car and I live in Ontario. From what I’ve read on government websites, to get the car (which is more than fifteen years old) across the border, I would need proof of ownership and notify US customs at least 72 hours in advance. And to successfully import, register, and license the car in Ontario, I believe I would need the title and a bill of sale. Am I missing anything? I’ve never privately bought a used car, let alone one south of the border. Lastly, is it possible to drive the car back? From what I read, I would need to be living in New York to get temporary plates at a DMV. Can anyone confirm? Thanks in advance!
Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
4123 posts
472 upvotes
Ottawa
There's a HUGE thread on buying US cars so you should search that for your answers.

But to answer your questions:

1. Any 15 year old or older car can be imported to Canada so you are fine there.
2. US CBP now require filing with AES to export vehicles from the US so there's more than just notifying them 72 hours in advance. I don't know if you can do this if you don't have a US SSN (might be possible with US ITIN). Probably a lot easier finding a service that will do it for you (I think you can get them for as cheap as $30-50). Having said that, this is a US requirement so technically, you don't need to do it to import the vehicle into Canada but there could be significant consequences if you are ever stopped at the US border with a car that was imported into Canada without ever being exported from the US.
3. You will have to contact a NY DMV to find out if they issue temporary / in-transit permits to non-residents. Not all states do but it was my impression that NY State did if the vehicle was registered in NY and being moved out of state or vice versa (they won't do it for transactions that don't involve NYS (e.g. I don't believe they'd do it if you bought a Florida registered car from someone in NY))\
4. Last step that you didn't mention is that you have to contact your insurance company and tell them you are purchasing a car in the US and need insurance until you can import and register in Canada. Most companies have no problem with this but a few are harder to deal with.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 6, 2010
9492 posts
3624 upvotes
Toronto
New poster, just joined, obviously isn't going to search. Easier to ask for help than help thyself.
Member
User avatar
Jun 24, 2005
451 posts
50 upvotes
Richmond Hill
I don't know what is your listing source, but I wouldn't trust an ad indicating that an American seller is looking to offload a car to Canada. Most likely it's a scam. Do your homework if you're serious in buying.
Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
4123 posts
472 upvotes
Ottawa
Stock R wrote:
Jun 29th, 2018 1:00 pm
Check the huge thread. There's a few extras like riv safety, recall letter, necessary modifications etc.
Good advice but just so it's clear, vehicles 15 years or older do not go through the RIV process so RIV safety, recall letter and modifications do not apply.
Sr. Member
Mar 9, 2009
518 posts
122 upvotes
OP, this blog has a post that details some of the steps they followed for the importation process. Might help.
Newbie
Jun 5, 2012
2 posts
Thornhill
Hi All, can anyone post a recent 2017/2018 story of attempting to import a car with the dealer modification "requirement"? I'm looking at importing a BMW 3 series, and concerned over the hassle in getting it fully driveable in Ontario. This post makes me think I am overly worried, but wanted to hear of any challenges from folks on here. It feels like the typical Canadian Tire doesn't care about what transport Canada shows in terms of requirements. I kinda wonder what the point of this nonsense is (from BMW Canada in this case).

About 5 years ago, I imported a cheap Toyota and it was pretty painless. I got a US printed recall letter from Toyota USA, and went to Canadian Tire to clear the RIV inspection. Easy-peasy.
Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
4123 posts
472 upvotes
Ottawa
bimmerm3m5 wrote:
Jul 13th, 2018 12:58 pm
Hi All, can anyone post a recent 2017/2018 story of attempting to import a car with the dealer modification "requirement"? I'm looking at importing a BMW 3 series, and concerned over the hassle in getting it fully driveable in Ontario. This post makes me think I am overly worried, but wanted to hear of any challenges from folks on here. It feels like the typical Canadian Tire doesn't care about what transport Canada shows in terms of requirements. I kinda wonder what the point of this nonsense is (from BMW Canada in this case).

About 5 years ago, I imported a cheap Toyota and it was pretty painless. I got a US printed recall letter from Toyota USA, and went to Canadian Tire to clear the RIV inspection. Easy-peasy.
The CT inspection and the recall letter are two distinct processes and have nothing to do with each other.

I have no experience with BMW so hopefully someone can help you with specifics but as far as CT, my experience is they process the form from RIV as is. The form has check marks and the CT employee will simply go down the list (i.e. in my experience (I've imported 5 cars, 4 motorhome and a boat from the US), they follow the RIV requirements to the letter).

As far as BMW, I believe the biggest hurdle is getting the recall clearance letter. If it's no longer on warranty, I thought you could get a printout from a US dealer showing no recalls and that was sufficient but if you want to keep an existing warranty, I believe you must go through a Canadian BMW dealer and are at their mercy and have to do whatever modifications they tell you are required.

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