Ongoing Deal Discussion

[Always] WOW ---- New and used cars from US up to 30% cheaper - Read post #1

Poll: Are Canadian cars overpriced

  • Total votes: 335. You have voted on this poll.
I have no voice, Canadian Dealers/Manufacturers are taking advantage of the Canadian consumer
 
112
33%
In most cases, new cars purchased in the US are almost always thousands cheaper
 
149
44%
I owe no one a living, competition is good. Thank you NAFTA!
 
61
18%
With the exchange rate factored in, Canadian prices are roughly the same
 
6
2%
With the exchange rate and financing, Canadian prices are cheaper - Buy Canadian!
 
7
2%

Poll ended at Dec 28th, 2006 1:46 pm

Member
User avatar
Mar 2, 2014
433 posts
166 upvotes
Did it in 2016, exporting a car with NY plates. We asked our insurer in Canada to give temporary coverage (around 30 days). After going back and forth about whether to get temporary permit, we did not get it.
Just used the existing NY plates, exported the car first at CBP (export office is only open during the day, make sure you and the car, both have been in USA for at least 24 hours before exporting).
Then imported it at CBSA office.
Drove around in Canada with NY plates and experienced the outsider looks from other cars /s

After finishing RIV formalities, gotta send the NY plate back to them, parceled it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 10, 2015
2014 posts
723 upvotes
Monte Creek, BC
Just do it right. Cross all your Ts and dot all your Is.
I brought in a trailer a few years ago and had it inspected at Crappy Tire. They passed it and were than to forward it to Transport Canada. Apparently that didn't happen.
A couple of weeks later I received a nasty letter from TC threatening me with a fine and/or imprisonment if the trailer wasn't destroyed or removed from Canada.
I fired off an even nastier email to TC with a cc to my MP along with the copy of the pass by Crappy Tire.
In the meantime I needed the trailer and registered it as a U-built.

Government bureaucracy, god I hate it.
No political content in signatures (Who did I offend?)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 1, 2005
4613 posts
1895 upvotes
Toronto
B0000rt wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 12:38 pm
Anyone do this recently?

I'm looking to import a car to Canada for my inlaws. I saw that www.riv.ca is the place to start, but I'm abit confused about the part where you gotta notify US Customs about exporting the car.

Is autoexports.us the real website? Seem super sketchy..

Also, how do you arrange for insurance and license plate between the time of purchase and driving the car to the border?

For the RIV inspection while in Canada, what are they looking for? Road worthiness/simple safety inspection?

Edit: Looks like they're checking for modifications required, ie DRL, metric speedometer etc... Car I'd be importing would be a 2007 Rav4 Titled in NJ.
Member since 2003, I am disapoint: how-buy-your-next-vehicle-us-save-thousands-477998/

Some of the links are broken because they have changed since 2007 but info is still mostly relevant.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 9, 2012
2975 posts
2059 upvotes
Oakville, ON
B0000rt wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 12:38 pm
Anyone do this recently?

I'm looking to import a car to Canada for my inlaws. I saw that www.riv.ca is the place to start, but I'm abit confused about the part where you gotta notify US Customs about exporting the car.

Is autoexports.us the real website? Seem super sketchy..

Also, how do you arrange for insurance and license plate between the time of purchase and driving the car to the border?

For the RIV inspection while in Canada, what are they looking for? Road worthiness/simple safety inspection?

Edit: Looks like they're checking for modifications required, ie DRL, metric speedometer etc... Car I'd be importing would be a 2007 Rav4 Titled in NJ.
Info from USA side on border requirements:

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail ... orcycle%29

https://www.cbp.gov/trade/basic-import- ... or-vehicle

Also, RIV requires more than just daytime running lights and metric labels on speedo — you’ll also have to make sure that the vehicle has an electronic immobilization system. Basically a key coded to the vehicle to prevent any copied key from starting the vehicle. It probably has it but you’ll need to make sure, otherwise it may not be worth it because you’ll have retrofit something to make it comply (costly).


See EXPLANATIONS section.

Note 1: [EIS] Electronic Immobilization System: for vehicles built AFTER September 1, 2007, you must read paragraph #9 of the "EXPLANATIONS" section.

Note 2: Possible modifications may include: daytime running lamps, electronic immobilization system (see Note 1), metric odometer and speedometer labels.

At federal inspection, the RIV will verify that vehicle is equipped with functional daytime running lamps. Importer must also demonstrate that the vehicle is equipped with an electronic immobilization system for vehicles built AFTER September 1, 2007. Other requirements may also apply.

For additional information specific to a vehicle, please contact a Honda dealer. Importers can also contact American Honda Motor Co. customer relations at 1-800-999-1009.


9. [EIS] ELECTRONIC IMMOBILIZATION SYSTEM - Every passenger vehicle, multipurpose passenger vehicle, truck and three-wheeled vehicle manufactured after September 1, 2007, with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) less than 4,536 kg (10,000 lbs), except an emergency vehicle or a walk-in van, must be equipped with an electronic immobilization system, as per the requirements of CMVSS 114 - Theft Protection.

Electronic immobilizers typically require a special key or a small electronic device to start a vehicle's engine. This type of system, when activated, prevents the operation of the engine in response to any attempt to start the vehicle without using the authorized key, by shutting off one or more parts of the engine's electrical system. This might include the starter, ignition or fuel system.

Many manufacturers equip some or all of their U.S. market vehicles with electronic immobilization systems that meet the requirements of CMVSS 114, while in some cases these are available only as an option. There are also several U.S. market vehicles that are either not equipped with electronic immobilization systems, or that are equipped with electronic immobilization systems that do not meet the requirements of CMVSS 114. Here are three possible circumstances:

Electronic Immobilizers Installed as Original Equipment and Certified to CMVSS 114
Vehicles equipped with such systems do not require any special inspection or modifications. They are listed as admissible without any special annotation regarding the immobilizer.

Electronic Immobilizers Installed as Original Equipment but Not Certified to CMVSS 114
Vehicles that do not comply with CMVSS 114 will require confirmation of the presence of an electronic immobilizer at the time of the RIV federal inspection. They are listed as admissible with a special annotation ([EIS]) regarding the immobilizer.

Demonstration of the presence of an electronic immobilizer can be done through one of the following means:
presentation of the completed vehicle purchase agreement showing the VIN and indicating the presence of an electronic immobilizer;
presentation of the vehicle window sticker (Monroney label) showing the VIN and indicating the presence of an electronic immobilizer;
a letter from the manufacturer showing the VIN and indicating the presence of an electronic immobilizer; and
other type of information present on the vehicle or on the ignition key or fob allowing the positive identification of such a system.
No Electronic Immobilizers Installed

These vehicles will need to be fitted with an immobilization system that conforms to National Standard of Canada CAN/ULC-S338-98, entitled Automobile Theft Deterrent Equipment and Systems: Electronic Immobilization (May 1998), published by the Underwriters' Laboratories of Canada, before being presented for registration under the laws of a province.

These are listed as admissible with a special annotation [EIS] regarding electronic immobilizers.
At the time of the required federal inspection at one of the RIV inspection stations, the importer must present the original invoice (and provide a copy to the RIV) confirming the installation of an electronic immobilizer compliant to CAN/ULC-S338-98, as mentioned above. The invoice must clearly indicate VIN, name and address of aftermarket installer, date of installation, and conformity of the system to CAN/ULC-S338-98.

Importers should be aware of the following BEFORE they purchase a vehicle in the U.S.:

there is no guarantee that an aftermarket immobilizer can be fitted to a vehicle;
some manufacturers have indicated that the installation of an aftermarket immobilizer may affect a vehicle's warranty; some manufacturers have indicated that the installation of an aftermarket immobilizer may affect the performance of certain safety equipment on a vehicle; certified installers of CAN/ULC-S338-98 aftermarket immobilizers may not be available in your local area; modifications may be complex and expensive; and importers enter the importation process at their own risk and Transport Canada assumes no liability.

Transport Canada does not endorse any brand of electronic immobilization systems or installers.
Deal Addict
Jul 4, 2004
4363 posts
599 upvotes
Ottawa
woobie wrote:
Feb 10th, 2019 3:16 pm
You have to have the information (copy of title) for the car at the port of export at least 72 hours in advance so they can do a title search. In my case it was at the Lewiston crossing.

As for driving the car home, others will have to chime in, I imported a Bike in December of 08 so riding home was a no go lol.
Here's the huge thread that has tons of info wow-new-used-cars-us-up-30-cheaper-read-post-1-307601/. Things do change so while there's a lot of information in the first post, I don't think it's complete and up to date so you'll have to make sure you have all the latest info.

The biggest change (discussed in detail in the thread) is that you can't simply send the title 72 hours ahead of time. Now, you MUST export the vehicle through the AES system. If you have a US SSN (possibly ITIN) you can do it yourself, otherwise I believe you have to hire someone to do this. If the export is not filed online, you cannot export the vehicle from the US.

Toyota's tend do be very easy to import to Canada and need very few modifications if any (I imported a Sienna, a Highlander and the Solara - I believe only the Solara required DRL activation (I just disabled the "DRL off" on the light switch).

Taxes, trip permits, etc vary state by state so you have to look up your specifics (I believe NJ will issue temp permits to non-residents without having to pay local taxes).

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