Ongoing Deal Discussion

[Always] WOW ---- New and used cars from US up to 30% cheaper - Read post #1

Poll: Are Canadian cars overpriced

  • Total votes: 335. You have voted on this poll.
I have no voice, Canadian Dealers/Manufacturers are taking advantage of the Canadian consumer
 
112
33%
In most cases, new cars purchased in the US are almost always thousands cheaper
 
149
44%
I owe no one a living, competition is good. Thank you NAFTA!
 
61
18%
With the exchange rate factored in, Canadian prices are roughly the same
 
6
2%
With the exchange rate and financing, Canadian prices are cheaper - Buy Canadian!
 
7
2%

Poll ended at Dec 28th, 2006 1:46 pm

Newbie
Aug 23, 2005
46 posts
2 upvotes
DrXenon wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 9:29 am
Dude, I hope you have a copy of this agreement, on letterhead. Arrangements like this with dealers have a habit of evaporating once the sale is finalized. Do you really think the service department (typically a completely separate management unit from sales) is going to submit a fraudulent reimbursement claim on your behalf when you actually show up with your warranty issue?
Yes I do have this agreement on their letterhead with their stamp and signature of Manager. I know that when they want to sell something they promise everything to you, then after the deal is done, noone remembers, so thats why I did it.
Banned
User avatar
Jul 14, 2007
441 posts
409 upvotes
Hee. I should have known that someone smart enough to be able to afford a TL would get everything in writing. It could be that the dealer is knowingly assuming the potential liability without any intention of defrauding Honda, but I kinda doubt it. Your hands are clean, though.
Newbie
Sep 3, 2007
42 posts
Ontario
Any speculation when either VW gti 2008, or Audi A3 make the RIV entry list? I am open to buy either, but only the 2007s show up.

Hoping for September maybe? The Subaru's are there now. Many vw/Audi close to the border are balking at selling to Canadians...might have to go deep in. If you are A dealer in NY give me a tell. I am in Ontario.

Lou
Newbie
Jul 26, 2007
82 posts
Hey folks, What do you think about this price that I just rec'd via e-mail from a U.S. Subaru Dealer? 2008 Tribeca 5 Pass. Limited (MSRP $33,270) for $29,999 all fees included. Even figuring in a liberal 6% exchange rate, the price seems awfully good. :D What's your opinions?
Newbie
Aug 27, 2007
6 posts
medicine hat
I noticed too that some 2008s arent on the RIV listg either yet yo can but them in canada or US
is it something to worry about
I am still looking at cars but buying some type of crossover and car soon i hope
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
5009 posts
1083 upvotes
Ottawa
DrXenon wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 9:29 am
Dude, I hope you have a copy of this agreement, on letterhead. Arrangements like this with dealers have a habit of evaporating once the sale is finalized. Do you really think the service department (typically a completely separate management unit from sales) is going to submit a fraudulent reimbursement claim on your behalf when you actually show up with your warranty issue?
Joko77 wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 9:44 am
Yes I do have this agreement on their letterhead with their stamp and signature of Manager. I know that when they want to sell something they promise everything to you, then after the deal is done, noone remembers, so thats why I did it.
Keep us informed if / when you do get warranty work done. I have to admit that I'm amazed the dealership would agree to that - from my understanding, the warranty with Acura became void the minute you exported the car to Canada and I was always under the impression that dealerships made very little off the actual car sale so for them to agree to potentially pay thousands of dollars out of pocket for future warranty work shocks me.

That being said, you did save a bunch so even if you lose the warranty and had to pay repairs yourself, you're probably still ahead.
Deal Addict
Dec 30, 2005
2743 posts
606 upvotes
tico 1948 wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 1:12 pm
Hey folks, What do you think about this price that I just rec'd via e-mail from a U.S. Subaru Dealer? 2008 Tribeca 5 Pass. Limited (MSRP $33,270) for $29,999 all fees included. Even figuring in a liberal 6% exchange rate, the price seems awfully good. :D What's your opinions?
GO FOR IT!
Deal Addict
Apr 14, 2004
1171 posts
167 upvotes
Montreal
tico 1948 wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 1:12 pm
Hey folks, What do you think about this price that I just rec'd via e-mail from a U.S. Subaru Dealer? 2008 Tribeca 5 Pass. Limited (MSRP $33,270) for $29,999 all fees included. Even figuring in a liberal 6% exchange rate, the price seems awfully good. :D What's your opinions?
Seems like a good price - around $1200 below invoice. However, I would get the 7 seat for about $1k more.

I paid $28.5k US for a 2007 7 seat Limited (No Nav, No DVD).

Here's a few invoice pricing for you.

http://www.bennington.sne1.com/
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 24, 2007
2548 posts
337 upvotes
North York
DrXenon wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 6:04 pm
One solution to the "no American address" problem with Toyota and like companies is to hire a mail forwarding service:

http://www.escapees.com/MailForwardingService.asp
http://www.mydakotaaddress.com/
http://www.americas-mailbox.com

I haven't actually used any of these services; it's just a suggestion.
US address is not the only issue - they are charging State Sales Tax - that's what kills the deal.
Newbie
Apr 4, 2004
17 posts
7 upvotes
Binbrook
State tax and the other fees and taxes that each state charges per vehicle....
Newbie
Sep 7, 2007
31 posts
42 upvotes
Burlington
Folks;

Here is a summary sheet I made up from a couple useful postings on importing a new car from the US into Canada. Also there is a good summary below on how to import a Toyota.

Thought I would share with you.

SUMMARY:
Out of state purchase 
get MCO and Bill of sale and recall letter 
fax to Border crossing 

wait 3 days 
drive to US border  stamped 
go to CDN border import and pay fees GST/DUTY/RIV/Air RIV forms 
Cdn tire inspection and DRL 
MTO for licence and PST.
The last thing to do which is important:
Invest the $10,000 to $20,000 in your childs education with the money you saved !!!! :razz:
<SNIP>

Steps For Importing A Car Into Canada:

1. Check if the car that you are planning to purchase is admissible for importing into Canada. The list is available at: www.riv.ca/english/US_vehicle_admissibility.pdf. This list also will state if any major modification is required to import your car into Canada.

2. Get your new car insured by your Canadian insurance company. Make sure that your insurance covers you while you are in the United States. The insurance coverage should begin on the day that you are planning to pick up your car.

3. After purchasing your car at a U.S. Dealer, they will issue you a one-month temporary license plate. You can drive in the U.S. and Canada (while you are completing the import process) with the temporary license during this period.

4. Fax the car's Certificate of Title to the U.S. Customs at the border where you will be exiting the Country. U.S. Customs needs three business days to process the title before they can authorize exportation of your car (a stamp is needed for importing the car into Canada). Call the U.S. Customs office to ensure that they have received your fax.

5. Request a "proof of recall clearance document" from your car's manufacturer. This will be required to register your car in Canada.

6. Drive the car to Canada. Allow three business days from when you faxed the title to the U.S. Customs before you go through the border (otherwise you will have to come back to the border to get the export stamp later). Note that Canada Customs may not allow a Canadian resident to drive their car with a U.S. license plate in Canada, unless they are satisfied that the owner is in the process of licensing the car in Canada. Make sure you go through the U.S. Customs office that received your fax (refer to Step 4 above).

7. Get your Certificate of Title stamped for exportation by U.S. Customs.

8. Drive to the Canadian Customs office. They will need the Bill of Sale and the Certificate of Title stamped by U.S. Customs for exportation. You will pay 7% GST, CAD$100 excise tax if your car has an air conditioner, and CAD$182 fee for the Registrar of Imported Vehicles (cars manufactured in the U.S.A and Canada are normally exempt from additional import duties). You may use a credit card or the payment. You will receive the Vehicle Import Form - Form 1. You will need this form to register the car in your province. A second form, Form 2, will be mailed to your home address within 5 to 7 business days.

9. In Ontario you will have to carry out a safety inspection and a vehicle emission inspection. For our last car these inspections were CAD$63.24 and CAD$37.45 for our last car (the car passed all tests without needing any work).

10. About two weeks after your arrival in Canada, you will receive the "Vehicle Import Form - Form 2" by mail.

11. Take Form 1 and Form 2 and the "proof of recall clearance document" (letter from your car's manufacturer which you requested in step 5 above) to an approved federal inspection centre (e.g. Canadian Tire). The service centre will do an inspection of the car to ensure that it conforms to Canadian standards. If your vehicle did not require major alterations according to http://www.riv.ca/english/US_vehicle_admissibility.pdf, it should pass this inspection with no problem. This inspection should not cost you anything, except if any modification is required. Our last inspection cost CAD$8.04 for the purchase of a tether bolt, which is required to be in all cars sold in Canada. After the completion of the federal inspection, the inspector will stamp Form 1.

12. Take Form 1, original title, bill of sales, safety inspection certificate (Ontario), emission inspection certificate (Ontario), and insurance certificate to your vehicle licence issuing office (the documents may vary in other provinces). In Ontario you will have to pay 8% Provincial Sales Tax and some additional fees for your license plate purchase and sticker.

13. Within a few days, you will receive your car's Canadian Certification Label by mail, which you will have to affix to the car.

-------
For those interested in importing a New Toyota from a dealer in the States:

If you have a relative/friend in the states, you can arrange the purchase under their name, and, more importantly, also avoid extra registration fees and US sales tax.

I just did this by picking a dealership from a different state as my relative. In this case, the dealer will just give you a temporary permit, and a copy of the MCO (Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin). This can be faxed to the US border, and will allow you to export the car without actually registering in the states or paying state sales tax. If you buy in the same state as your relative, then the dealer is pretty much obligated to register and plate the car. The out-of-state thing is crucial if you want to avoid the extra delay and cost of having to register and transfer the car.

All the paperwork was done by courier between the dealer and my relative. I brought the payment, and picked up the vehicle. There was no need to actually physically, or financially, involve my relative in the transaction.

The trick is that you have to indicate to US customs that your relative is the purchaser/exporter and that you are the transporter. Their name will have to go on the MCO, and you cannot transfer the MCO, in the States, between individuals. It can only be transferred from a dealer to an individual, or between dealers.

Luckily, the Canadian system doesn't have the same restrictions. I drew up a simple bill of sale between my relative and myself, effective the date of pickup. I used this, along with the stamped MCO, and was able to start the RIV process under my own name, once I got the vehicle to Canada.

Essentially, I exported the vehicle from the US under my relative's name, and imported it into Canada under my name. I had no problems with insurance, or registration in Canada, pretty much disclosed everything to everyone. (Except US customs, and that was because they didn't ask!).

I saved a ton of money, and the dealer was more than happy to sell the car. Toyota has no restrictions about re-sale, so his ass was firmly covered. He even helped me with faxing things ahead of time to US customs, and getting me a service printout to prove recall clearance.

SUMMARY:
Out of state purchase &#61664;
get MCO and Bill of sale and recall letter &#61664;
fax to Border crossing &#61664;

wait 3 days &#61664;
drive to US border &#61664; stamped &#61664;
go to CDN border &#61664;import and pay fees GST/DUTY/RIV/Air&#61664; RIV forms &#61664;
Cdn tire inspection and DRL &#61664;
MTO for licence and PST.
The last thing to do which is important:
Invest the $10,000 to $20,000 in your childs education with the money you saved !!!!
Deal Addict
Dec 30, 2005
2743 posts
606 upvotes
frugal905 wrote:
Sep 9th, 2007 12:01 am
Folks;

Here is a summary sheet I made up from a couple useful postings on importing a new car from the US into Canada. Also there is a good summary below on how to import a Toyota.

Thought I would share with you.
On your previous post, you mentioned bout purchasing a Prius, is that what you ended up with? Wierd...you posted questions on the same day and reported buying a Toyota the same day?
Newbie
Jul 26, 2007
82 posts
scouzi wrote:
Sep 8th, 2007 4:21 pm
Seems like a good price - around $1200 below invoice. However, I would get the 7 seat for about $1k more.

I paid $28.5k US for a 2007 7 seat Limited (No Nav, No DVD).

Here's a few invoice pricing for you.

http://www.bennington.sne1.com/
Yes Man, looks like you did alright but, the 5 pass. limited is more suitable for our family situation, no young/small children. Instead, we have a 17 yr. old 6'5 Basketball player. Guess where He's gonna want to sit in that vehicle? Anywhere, as long as the ignition key comes with it. ;)

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