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York's B.A.S (Bachelors of Administrative Studies) - 3 year and 4 year question

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[OP]
Member
Jan 25, 2009
336 posts
29 upvotes

York's B.A.S (Bachelors of Administrative Studies) - 3 year and 4 year question

I posted this under York forum but got no reply, so posting it here:

Ok heres my question -
York university offers B.A.S 3 year degree and a B.A.S honours 4 year degree. If I graduate with a 3 year degree, can I go back after a year or two to do a major and convert it into a B.A.S 4 year honour?
21 replies
Newbie
Nov 5, 2009
72 posts
8 upvotes
Toronto
raviji wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2011 9:11 pm
I posted this under York forum but got no reply, so posting it here:

Ok heres my question -
York university offers B.A.S 3 year degree and a B.A.S honours 4 year degree. If I graduate with a 3 year degree, can I go back after a year or two to do a major and convert it into a B.A.S 4 year honour?
You should be able to, I don't see why not. But, why don't you do the 4 years honours program instead of going for the 3 year one? It would save you time and money.
Newbie
Jan 12, 2007
83 posts
3 upvotes
You can. To make things simpler, just enroll in the honours 4 year program. Enroll in courses based on the 4 year program. This way, you can also enroll in 4th year courses when you have 78. More importantly, it will make returning to complete your degree a lot easier since you will be on track. You can apply to graduate with or without honours once you meet the respective requirements. Also make sure you maintain a 5.5 GPA.

I've been through this process. I found it quite simple since they have all your stuff on file. It's just a matter of re-enrolling and going to an advising session.
Jr. Member
Feb 26, 2010
149 posts
2 upvotes
just out of curiosity how is york's bas program?
[OP]
Member
Jan 25, 2009
336 posts
29 upvotes
sickgirl96 wrote:
Apr 4th, 2011 3:26 pm
You can. To make things simpler, just enroll in the honours 4 year program. Enroll in courses based on the 4 year program. This way, you can also enroll in 4th year courses when you have 78. More importantly, it will make returning to complete your degree a lot easier since you will be on track. You can apply to graduate with or without honours once you meet the respective requirements. Also make sure you maintain a 5.5 GPA.

I've been through this process. I found it quite simple since they have all your stuff on file. It's just a matter of re-enrolling and going to an advising session.

This info is 100% correct. I had an advising appointment and the advisor said the same thing. Thanks girl, you are sick! I mean, thanks sickgirl96 lol haha

To answer the above question, it is a good program...I am finding it quite challenging.
Newbie
Apr 4, 2010
20 posts
Now, what if you want to finish up the 3 year BAS degree at york university, and take an year off. And than the following year transfer to Ryerson's BCOM specialization in Finance and get half your credits transfered to ryerson, so you would technically start as a 3rd year student.

Would one suggests this a good option, as many might think that the bcom program is better than the bas program york offers. But I can say york's 4 year bas program is quite challenging.
Also this way ryerson does offer an MBA program as well, so can make it easier to apply right after the 4 year program. (This regarding to a better entry level full time position after graduation.)
Sr. Member
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Jan 12, 2009
719 posts
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just curious-what type of job can you get with a 3yr degree Bachelors of admin degree? i was thinking of working for a bit, but not too sure in my specialized stream atm
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How does this program compare to Ryerson's 4 year BCom?
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CSIFan29 wrote:
Dec 19th, 2011 8:17 pm
How does this program compare to Ryerson's 4 year BCom?

I would say the bas program is slightly superior than the bcomm's. The bas program's admission avg required from highschool is higher than Ryerson's bcomm. I know this because I applied to both schools back in 2009 and one of my closest friends go there now.

Also, for the people that are doing 3 years.. you have to understand that you won't be able to specialize in a steam (ex. accounting, finance, hr,etc) and you will be losing out on the opportunity of applying to graduate school. Not only that but it shows that you couldn't handle the min req average for the required honours. That's why for almost every uni, there is a Honours and a regular bachelors.
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imflying12 wrote:
Dec 20th, 2011 10:38 am
I would say the bas program is slightly superior than the bcomm's. The bas program's admission avg required from highschool is higher than Ryerson's bcomm. I know this because I applied to both schools back in 2009 and one of my closest friends go there now.

Also, for the people that are doing 3 years.. you have to understand that you won't be able to specialize in a steam (ex. accounting, finance, hr,etc) and you will be losing out on the opportunity of applying to graduate school. Not only that but it shows that you couldn't handle the min req average for the required honours. That's why for almost every uni, there is a Honours and a regular bachelors.

Eh.. I'm of two minds on this.

First of all, the answer to the OPs question surprised me. At UWO, you can't just graduate, then upgrade your degree and graduate again with another year of work, essentially getting 2 degrees. I think they will give you 2 years worth of credits, then you have to somehow fill in the rest with other credits, and somehow meet all the criteria to graduate again (essay courses, cross-faculty requirements, etc) - They really discourage people from doubling up on bachelor degrees like this.

But as for 3yr degrees, it depends what you want to do. I know that I picked a 3yr degree because some of the honours requirements didn't interest me in the slightest. It wasn't that they were too difficult necessarily, just the subject matter put me to sleep. Doing a 3yr degree can actually help you specialize by allowing you to skip a lot of the courses you don't like. You can even opt for a thesis at the end of year 3 if you like. I'm thinking about doing this, because I think it would actually make me a candidate for grad school.
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Newbie
Apr 15, 2010
92 posts
6 upvotes
Toronto
York has a pretty brutal reputation I would only go there as a last resort.
Newbie
Jun 14, 2006
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iWheel wrote:
Dec 21st, 2011 12:40 pm
York has a pretty brutal reputation I would only go there as a last resort.

TROLL ALERT :!: lol... this person doesn't know what they're talking about...
Newbie
Apr 2, 2012
4 posts
1 upvote
MISSISSAUGA
I have been reading up on a lot of grad school information lately, and started coming across quite a few undergrad business degree debates. I apologize in advance for the long post, but I believe this should clear up a lot of mis-confusion about York's School of Administrative Studies.

First thing is first, it is no longer Atkinson. The main faculty is now Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. However this program is very independent of the faculty and conforms to its own rules. The program is now essentially run by the "School of Administrative Studies" aka SAS. The SAS standards are almost in all cases higher than other LA&PS programs.

As a previous McMaster Student (Physics) and a current York Student (BAS), with numerous friends in business programs all over Canada and the United States, I think I have a pretty good idea of what I'm talking about.

I can't speak about the BAS program from earlier years as I wasn't there. But what I'm saying now currently applies.

A lot of people on forums make claims with absolute no proof, and the underlying assumptions of their claims are just absurd.

York's Bachelor of Administrative Studies curriculum is extremely similar to Schulich School of Business. In most cases, we use the same textbooks and course kits; we also share the same economics department and professors.

The major differentiating factor between the two programs (in terms of study) is that the BBA through Schulich School of Business is only offered Full time in the day. While the the BAS is available full time as well as part time and in the evening through the School of Administrative Studies. Ofcourse Shulich School of Business is very prestigious and enjoys all the perks that come with all that prestige. But my point here is to explain the curriculum, which is very similar. Perhaps for this reason we share the same library; the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library.

At many times, the same professors are teaching classes at both programs; for example Dr. Yogendra Acharya. He not only teaches undergrad courses at both faculties, he also teaches at the Masters level at Schulich School of Business. His qualifications include; BBA,LLB,MBA,MPA,MSc,PhD (Melbourne).

I have met professors from many different school, and I can say for certain that our professors are extremely educated and hold multiple degrees and perhaps more competent that a majority of professors at other institutions (Based on my experience at McMaster). I have not had a single professor yet that does not hold a PhD. My accounting professors have all been CMAs or CAs. My Finance professor holds the CFA charter. My Emergency & Disaster Management professor is one of the pioneers of the Emergency Management program in Canada (Ali Asgary, previously helped initiate the program in Alberta and now creating a PhD program at York). I have also noticed most of my professors have graduated from top schools, such as Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon.

The CFO of of LCBO, Alex Browning, is a part time professor at our school as well. So we literally have top level executives teaching and guiding us.

Almost all of our lecture slides and notes are accessible on the course website a few minutes after class ends, and recently even a video recording of the lecture becomes available. This is absolutely amazing when you're sick and can't make it to school. These are little things that should raise satisfaction. My friend at Ryerson commerce confirms that only a few of his professors put up slides, some never even reply to emails.

Now in terms of getting a job, I believe that has everything to do with you as a person and very little to do with the institution you graduate from. Especially at the undergraduate level. Firms want to hire a person, not an institution. Excellent volunteer experience, community involvement and proper etiquette play a considerably larger role than where your degree is from. A couple of my friends that recently graduated have all been hired by the Big 4 accounting firms or BMO. Once you register with Career Services, you will receive emails very regularly about various events that go on through out the year that give you an opportunity to meet with recruiters. I've noticed a lot of big public firms also hire at York, due to their large involvement in political sciences.

I also assure you, there is no such things as "Easy As" in this program (I can't speak about the past, but as of now that is not true). Here is a post on the course website from my Professor (Alison Kemper),

"I have been given fierce direction that the mean I report to SAS at the end of the semester has to be around 63%. There are not a lot of high grades I can give out, I am afraid."

(SAS refers to School of Administrative Studies, it is no longer referred to as Atkinson)

63% is a lower than the average that UTSG bell curves to. The BAS currently is an extremely competitive program. Also to graduate with Honours and specialize in a stream/major, your GPA must be C+, which can become a challenge if the professors are bell curving the class down to 63% (C). So when graduating with Honours, it shows you were a competent student.

Also my friend out of high school had an 82% Final Average, York BAS rejected him; Ryerson Commerce accepted him. This is last year. From Electronic Info's website, Ryerson admission requirements are 77-82% while York BAS cut offs are Mid80s. From what I've heard (from my friends that volunteer at the admissions office), the BAS program has cut the number of students they accept to about 300-350 for this year; which is far off from Ryerson's 1200-1400 student enrolment numbers.

I can guarantee you that after completing the BAS Hons. program you will be a competitive and competent individual. What you do with your newly learned knowledge and experience is completely up to you. Networking with professors and volunteering is a great way to ensure yourself a job after graduation! Most of the professors are extremely well connected, and I'm sure if you make a listing impression on them, they will be willing to assist you when you need help!

I'm extremely satisfied with the program, the professors, the curriculum, the lecture halls, students (in most cases) and the school itself. It's a good time all around!
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Aug 9, 2011
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MoneyTalk wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2012 3:14 am
I have been reading up on a lot of grad school information lately, and started coming across quite a few undergrad business degree debates. I apologize in advance for the long post, but I believe this should clear up a lot of mis-confusion about York's School of Administrative Studies.

First thing is first, it is no longer Atkinson. The main faculty is now Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. However this program is very independent of the faculty and conforms to its own rules. The program is now essentially run by the "School of Administrative Studies" aka SAS. The SAS standards are almost in all cases higher than other LA&PS programs.

As a previous McMaster Student (Physics) and a current York Student (BAS), with numerous friends in business programs all over Canada and the United States, I think I have a pretty good idea of what I'm talking about.

I can't speak about the BAS program from earlier years as I wasn't there. But what I'm saying now currently applies.

A lot of people on forums make claims with absolute no proof, and the underlying assumptions of their claims are just absurd.

York's Bachelor of Administrative Studies curriculum is extremely similar to Schulich School of Business. In most cases, we use the same textbooks and course kits; we also share the same economics department and professors.

The major differentiating factor between the two programs (in terms of study) is that the BBA through Schulich School of Business is only offered Full time in the day. While the the BAS is available full time as well as part time and in the evening through the School of Administrative Studies. Ofcourse Shulich School of Business is very prestigious and enjoys all the perks that come with all that prestige. But my point here is to explain the curriculum, which is very similar. Perhaps for this reason we share the same library; the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library.

At many times, the same professors are teaching classes at both programs; for example Dr. Yogendra Acharya. He not only teaches undergrad courses at both faculties, he also teaches at the Masters level at Schulich School of Business. His qualifications include; BBA,LLB,MBA,MPA,MSc,PhD (Melbourne).

I have met professors from many different school, and I can say for certain that our professors are extremely educated and hold multiple degrees and perhaps more competent that a majority of professors at other institutions (Based on my experience at McMaster). I have not had a single professor yet that does not hold a PhD. My accounting professors have all been CMAs or CAs. My Finance professor holds the CFA charter. My Emergency & Disaster Management professor is one of the pioneers of the Emergency Management program in Canada (Ali Asgary, previously helped initiate the program in Alberta and now creating a PhD program at York). I have also noticed most of my professors have graduated from top schools, such as Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon.

The CFO of of LCBO, Alex Browning, is a part time professor at our school as well. So we literally have top level executives teaching and guiding us.

Almost all of our lecture slides and notes are accessible on the course website a few minutes after class ends, and recently even a video recording of the lecture becomes available. This is absolutely amazing when you're sick and can't make it to school. These are little things that should raise satisfaction. My friend at Ryerson commerce confirms that only a few of his professors put up slides, some never even reply to emails.

Now in terms of getting a job, I believe that has everything to do with you as a person and very little to do with the institution you graduate from. Especially at the undergraduate level. Firms want to hire a person, not an institution. Excellent volunteer experience, community involvement and proper etiquette play a considerably larger role than where your degree is from. A couple of my friends that recently graduated have all been hired by the Big 4 accounting firms or BMO. Once you register with Career Services, you will receive emails very regularly about various events that go on through out the year that give you an opportunity to meet with recruiters. I've noticed a lot of big public firms also hire at York, due to their large involvement in political sciences.

I also assure you, there is no such things as "Easy As" in this program (I can't speak about the past, but as of now that is not true). Here is a post on the course website from my Professor (Alison Kemper),

"I have been given fierce direction that the mean I report to SAS at the end of the semester has to be around 63%. There are not a lot of high grades I can give out, I am afraid."

(SAS refers to School of Administrative Studies, it is no longer referred to as Atkinson)

63% is a lower than the average that UTSG bell curves to. The BAS currently is an extremely competitive program. Also to graduate with Honours and specialize in a stream/major, your GPA must be C+, which can become a challenge if the professors are bell curving the class down to 63% (C). So when graduating with Honours, it shows you were a competent student.

Also my friend out of high school had an 82% Final Average, York BAS rejected him; Ryerson Commerce accepted him. This is last year. From Electronic Info's website, Ryerson admission requirements are 77-82% while York BAS cut offs are Mid80s. From what I've heard (from my friends that volunteer at the admissions office), the BAS program has cut the number of students they accept to about 300-350 for this year; which is far off from Ryerson's 1200-1400 student enrolment numbers.

I can guarantee you that after completing the BAS Hons. program you will be a competitive and competent individual. What you do with your newly learned knowledge and experience is completely up to you. Networking with professors and volunteering is a great way to ensure yourself a job after graduation! Most of the professors are extremely well connected, and I'm sure if you make a listing impression on them, they will be willing to assist you when you need help!

I'm extremely satisfied with the program, the professors, the curriculum, the lecture halls, students (in most cases) and the school itself. It's a good time all around!

Very well said. This program is for sure overlooked and people need to take their biases off of it. I remember two years back in highschool when friends applied to York's BAS program with low 80s and got rejected with offers for ITEC and economics (i believe). Most of them ended going to Ryerson's bcomm since they couldnt get int york's admin studies program.
My brother does go there (in his 3rd year admin studies for finance) now and everything he says matches with what you say- that all his business professors are extremely educated, etc. My brother was complaining how hard his first year accounting courses were (believe it was financial accounting and managerial) prof ended up bell curving all exams. O_O
Im in utsc's mgmt co op program and i can say that most of the stuff we learn are quite similar to York's admin studies. The curriculum is different but some of the courses like business law are very similar.
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May 16, 2005
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MoneyTalk wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2012 3:14 am

York's Bachelor of Administrative Studies curriculum is extremely similar to Schulich School of Business. In most cases, we use the same textbooks and course kits; we also share the same economics department and professors.

The major differentiating factor between the two programs (in terms of study) is that the BBA through Schulich School of Business is only offered Full time in the day. While the the BAS is available full time as well as part time and in the evening through the School of Administrative Studies. Ofcourse Shulich School of Business is very prestigious and enjoys all the perks that come with all that prestige. But my point here is to explain the curriculum, which is very similar. Perhaps for this reason we share the same library; the Peter F. Bronfman Business Library.

You forgot 1 major differentiating factor between the BAS and the BBA program at York. The quality of the student body. For the most part, the BBA students tend to be the over-achievers, and go-getters, while BAS tend to be the more of the group average. And for a business degree program, you learn as much from your fellow students, as from the course content.

This also applies to B-Schools such as Queen's, Ivey, Rotman, and McGill....its not so much that the text book and professors are the same, and they share the same library. Its more the student body that makes the program different. Those programs have the majority of the go-getters, the high school student council members, etc...

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