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York's B.A.S (Bachelors of Administrative Studies) - 3 year and 4 year question

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  • Oct 11th, 2017 11:03 pm
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MoneyTalk wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2012 3:14 am
I also assure you, there is no such things as "Easy As" in this program (I can't speak about the past, but as of now that is not true). Here is a post on the course website from my Professor (Alison Kemper),

"I have been given fierce direction that the mean I report to SAS at the end of the semester has to be around 63%. There are not a lot of high grades I can give out, I am afraid."

Are you taking 1010 as well? I might be in the same class as you :D

Anyways, I'm finding the program relatively difficult as well (I'm in my first year right now). With regards to the prof, all of the profs I've had are qualified enough to teach the course. However, it has been a mixed bag and I've had a fair share of bad profs. Also, with regards to the student population, I agree that the student body in the regular adms program is not at the same caliber as the students in Schulich or other top business programs, but that doesn't mean that the students are at a disadvantage. There's tons of resources around that'll help the students excel as long as they're willing to put in the effort to do so. It's the same in any institution, whether you're in Ivey or Schulich, that if you don't put in the effort to fully utilize the resources available, you won't fully benefit from going to the institution in the first place.
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Apr 2, 2012
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commie wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2012 11:18 pm
You forgot 1 major differentiating factor between the BAS and the BBA program at York. The quality of the student body. For the most part, the BBA students tend to be the over-achievers, and go-getters, while BAS tend to be the more of the group average. And for a business degree program, you learn as much from your fellow students, as from the course content.

This also applies to B-Schools such as Queen's, Ivey, Rotman, and McGill....its not so much that the text book and professors are the same, and they share the same library. Its more the student body that makes the program different. Those programs have the majority of the go-getters, the high school student council members, etc...

That is definitely true, especially for first year students in the BBA program, they are much more focused and share the "go-getter" mentality. However I've noticed that trend goes downwards at Schulich as students progress into 2nd and 3rd year. Majority of these students are used to getting 90s in high school and come in knowing they are the elite few from their respective high schools. However when assessments at university start yielding much lower marks, that previous self confidence somewhat dissipates to a lower lever.

I can say from personal experience, that the student body at the SAS gets exponentially more connected with each other by the end of the second year. Most classes incorporate case analysis that are to be conducted in groups, as they would in real life. This sense of connectedness with each other also increases involvement, as I see a lot more students concerned with internships and volunteer opportunities in upper years as the "weaker" students start getting filtered out.

I'm confident, I can go head-to-head against the majority of Schulich students in academic assessments and case competitions.
windforcexx28 wrote:
Apr 4th, 2012 12:38 am
Are you taking 1010 as well? I might be in the same class as you :D

Anyways, I'm finding the program relatively difficult as well (I'm in my first year right now). With regards to the prof, all of the profs I've had are qualified enough to teach the course. However, it has been a mixed bag and I've had a fair share of bad profs. Also, with regards to the student population, I agree that the student body in the regular adms program is not at the same caliber as the students in Schulich or other top business programs, but that doesn't mean that the students are at a disadvantage. There's tons of resources around that'll help the students excel as long as they're willing to put in the effort to do so. It's the same in any institution, whether you're in Ivey or Schulich, that if you don't put in the effort to fully utilize the resources available, you won't fully benefit from going to the institution in the first place.
I most likely am in your class! I'm just finishing up my second year, didn't take this course first year, so decided to get it out of the way this year! Whats your major?
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Apr 2, 2012
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commie wrote:
Apr 4th, 2012 11:55 pm
WTF did you just say there? if that is what the level of communication of a BAS student, then hell no....its not equal...lol

WTF is 'exponentially more connected with each other'? getting filtered out......working in groups?

From my perspective, won't the fact that the case analysis being done in groups, be a case of the quality of the student body being more important?
I would like my group members to be of same 'go-getter' mentality, and have the same mentality and capability, and willingness to do the hard work.;

lol I don't see a fault in my statement. Perhaps you misunderstood.

Exponentially more connected with each other, in terms of numbers of social connections. York is generally considered a "commuter school" and most people are initially only acquainted with very few other students. As you progress in to 2nd year and so on, you start networking a lot more with your fellow classmates. This has a lot to do with the way the upper year classes are designed, which I'm sure holds true for most institutions. Part of that design is an emphasis on group based case studies being a large part of your assessment. An example of this was a table top exercise that was completed in our Emergency and Disaster Management course, which was essentially a mock-up board meeting of powerful city officials (i.e. Commissioner of Finance, Legal, etc), conducted in an actual board room.

Weaker students who are unable to show the same level of initiative as other "high-achieving" students, generally end up dropping the course by midterm. What you end up with is a group of high-achieving, highly motivated students working together.

For example, in the first year I had close friendships with about 5 or 6 other students. By the end of second year, I'm on very good terms with at least 30+ fellow classmates. I'm sure you can see that the second number is "exponentially" larger than the first.

Perhaps you thought I meant "connected" as in the strength of the bond between a relationship.
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cardocmcs wrote:
Apr 11th, 2012 3:01 pm
Moneytalk, I am near completion of my BAS (no honours) degree at YorkU SAS. Is my non-honours BAS degree worth anything?

Well ask yourself this question: Why arent you on honours? If your not on honours, you cannot specialize in accounting, finance, management, etc. You basically have a 3 year degree which employers will look down upon you since you arent competent enough to be in the 4 year honours. This is for any university program. Normally, if you do not meet that set minimum requirement gpa for honours, your placed into the regular 3 year bachelors. If your gpa is below that minimum requirement, your required to withdraw.

Dude, If i were you I would try and change programs to something that your better in if you cannot handle business. Otherwise, you will not be able to find a good job, grad school will be off the list, etc
Newbie
Oct 10, 2017
2 posts
I have a question. If I do the Bas at York does it fully prepare me for CPA after the four years of undergrad?
Newbie
Oct 10, 2017
2 posts
I have a question. If I do the Bas at York does it fully prepare me for CPA after the four years of undergrad?

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