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Locked: You do not need a license for a bow,.

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Jun 17, 2006
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Halton

You do not need a license for a bow,.

You do NOT need a license for a Crossbow/Compound bow for someone who asked me today!
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I overheard some coworkers mention "not any longer", now that it isn't classified as a firearm.

You need no license to get one?
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Not anymore?

There never was a requirement for a license to purchase or own a Compound Bow.
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It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that a compound bow is NOT restricted and you can walk in anytime and bring one home.

How do I know? The bloody things are in the outside shelves, not in the locked shelves like the shotguns and powerful BB guns.
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Mattones wrote:
Sep 21st, 2008 10:36 pm
....I dont wanna go to a bow store and look like an idiot.
Just bring along one of your piranha's. I'm pretty sure nobody would mock you if they knew you'd throw the thing at their ballSACK for mocking you :D .
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You need a PAL for a crossbow but not a compound bow.
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i6s1 wrote:
Sep 22nd, 2008 1:25 am
You need a PAL for a crossbow but not a compound bow.
You do not need a PAL for a crossbow unless it shoots bolts at 500fps or greater. Crossbows fall under the same classification as a non-firearm; excepting those over the 500fps mark.
"When the common good of a society is regarded as something apart from and superior to the individual good of its members, it means that the good of some men takes precedence over the good of others, with those others consigned to the status of sacrificial animals." -- Ayn Rand

Every facet, every deposit of your mind is to be programmed by you; and unless you assume your rightful responsibility and begin to program your own mind, the world will program it for you.
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Peckerwood wrote:
Sep 22nd, 2008 4:55 am
You do not need a PAL for a crossbow unless it shoots bolts at 500fps or greater. Crossbows fall under the same classification as a non-firearm; excepting those over the 500fps mark.
Really? Then why did they put crossbows on the back of PALs?
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i6s1 wrote:
Sep 22nd, 2008 5:16 am
Really? Then why did they put crossbows on the back of PALs?
Because, like he stated, crossbows can reach over 500fps which would classify them as a firearm. Not all shoot over 500fps so not all require a PAL.
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The portion of the law that would have classified crossbows as firearms, never actually passed.

As was previously stated, if it shoots over the 500fps mark then it is a firearm as per the actual definition of a firearm in the CCC. The only other regs on crossbows is in accordance with prohib status...that is, crossbows under 500 mm OAL and hand-crossbows
"When the common good of a society is regarded as something apart from and superior to the individual good of its members, it means that the good of some men takes precedence over the good of others, with those others consigned to the status of sacrificial animals." -- Ayn Rand

Every facet, every deposit of your mind is to be programmed by you; and unless you assume your rightful responsibility and begin to program your own mind, the world will program it for you.
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Lava wrote:
Sep 22nd, 2008 5:44 am
Because, like he stated, crossbows can reach over 500fps which would classify them as a firearm. Not all shoot over 500fps so not all require a PAL.
Pellet guns can also reach over 500 FPS and they're NOT listed on the back of PALs.


http://www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca/faq/default_e.asp#a4
Q. What is considered to be a firearm for purposes of the Firearms Act and for offences related to the Firearms Act in the Criminal Code?

As set out in the Firearms Act, "firearm" means:

* a barrelled weapon from which any shot, bullet or other projectile can be discharged and that is capable of causing serious bodily injury or death to a person, and includes
* any frame or receiver of such a barrelled weapon, as well as
* anything that can be adapted for use as a firearm.

Following are some weapons and devices that meet the definition of a firearm but that are deemed not to be firearms for purposes of the Firearms Act and related offences in the Criminal Code. Some of these items are exempted from the definition only if they were designed exclusively for a specific purpose and are intended to be used exclusively for that purpose by the person who possesses it. However, all of the items listed below are considered to be firearms if used in a criminal or negligent manner.

* Antique firearms;
* Devices designed exclusively for signalling, for notifying of distress, for firing blank cartridges or for firing stud cartridges, explosive-driven rivets or other industrial projectiles;
* Shooting devices designed exclusively forslaughtering domestic animals, tranquilizing animals, or discharging projectiles with lines attached to them;
* Air guns and other barreled weapons designed to have:
o A muzzle velocity of 152.4 meters (500 feet) per second or less and/or
o A muzzle energy of 5.7 joules (4.2 foot pounds) or less.


Q. Do the licensing and registration requirements apply to bows?

Crossbows that can be aimed and fired with one hand and crossbows with an overall length of 500 mm (about 19.68 inches) or less are prohibited. You cannot lawfully possess or acquire a prohibited crossbow.

You do not need a valid licence or registration certificate to possess any other type of bow, including a crossbow that is longer than 500 mm and that requires the use of both hands. Criminal Code provisions making it an offence to acquire a crossbow without a valid licence were never brought into force.

If you plan to use a bow to hunt, please check provincial hunting regulations for information on hunting licence requirements and restrictions that may apply to the use of bows. For example, some provinces do not allow crossbows for hunting.
Since a crossbow isn't a barreled weapon, it doesn't appear to meet the definition of a firearm.
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I seem to remember reading a definition at some point in time in the CCC that added the phrase "along a rail or groove" into the portion next to barrel.

I can't seem to find it and I have no idea if it is still there. To be honest it was 8 years ago when I last read that.
"When the common good of a society is regarded as something apart from and superior to the individual good of its members, it means that the good of some men takes precedence over the good of others, with those others consigned to the status of sacrificial animals." -- Ayn Rand

Every facet, every deposit of your mind is to be programmed by you; and unless you assume your rightful responsibility and begin to program your own mind, the world will program it for you.
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Why not just call ahead and ask the people at the bow shop? then you will have the correct information and can go from there.
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Step 1: Buy weapon.

Step 2: Look into legal requirements of buying weapon.

Ready!

Fire!

Aim!

(cart before horse, etc, etc)

BTW, in the hunting course that you're "taking" they should have gone over pull strength, arrow selection and legality of bows and crossbows.
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Mattones wrote:
Sep 21st, 2008 10:36 pm
^^thats exactly what I was told but it confused me I dont wanna go to a bow store and look like an idiot.
Why don't you just call the store, they must deal with it on a daily basis and I dont think any kind of non mechanical bow has ever been restricted as the basis for restriction was supposed to be speed of the bolt or arrow.
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