Health & Wellness

Are you getting a flu shot?

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 20th, 2019 9:42 pm
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Newbie
May 3, 2004
15 posts
8 upvotes
Calgary
My immune system is low and before I used to get the flu shot, I’d get the flu which often become bronchitis and there were times I was close to pneumonia. I had hacking coughs that I could not shake for months! It was hard to deal with and I would carry asthma inhalers or steroid inhalers to try overcome these cough spells. When I started getting flu shots, it’s been great - haven’t had illness or bad coughs anymore for several years now, and neither has my spouse. I’m not sure why, but if getting me the flu shot keeps me illness free.... I’m for it!
A close friend of ours in mid 50’s got the flu before Christmas, turned into pneumonia and had to spend weeks in hospital fighting it. Then his body was so tired fighting this, he got H1N1 in hospital and passed away recently. We are so sad to lose our wonderful friend, but it all started with the flu and how dangerous it can affect people.... just my opinion.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
12583 posts
1951 upvotes
City of Vancouver
I've been sick the whole week and feel crappy. I had bad sinus pain, my gums and lips were throbbing, and Advil and Emergen-C didn't seem to make a difference. I don't have body aches, so I guess I don't have the flu? Or, do I have a mild case of the flu because I had the flu shot, and the shot isn't accurate but offers some help in severity?

I watched some anti-vacc'ers on youtube, and their arguments sound good to me.
De gustibus non est disputandum
Deal Guru
Jun 15, 2012
11840 posts
5921 upvotes
Southern Ontario
Becks wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2019 8:45 pm
I've been sick the whole week and feel crappy. I had bad sinus pain, my gums and lips were throbbing, and Advil and Emergen-C didn't seem to make a difference. I don't have body aches, so I guess I don't have the flu? Or, do I have a mild case of the flu because I had the flu shot, and the shot isn't accurate but offers some help in severity?

I watched some anti-vacc'ers on youtube, and their arguments sound good to me.
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/misconceptions.htm

If you acquired a type of influenza not in the vaccine, you may have less severe symptoms. Nobody can answer whether you actually have the flu or got some other respiratory viral infection without NP testing (a nasopharyngeal swab).
Deal Addict
Jul 10, 2014
2261 posts
622 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
I only get the flu about 50% of the years. Usually beat it in a couple of days. Until my immune system is compromised, I will be going without flu shot
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 28, 2006
10053 posts
1530 upvotes
What arguments of anti-vacc'ers sound good to you?
Becks wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2019 8:45 pm
I've been sick the whole week and feel crappy. I had bad sinus pain, my gums and lips were throbbing, and Advil and Emergen-C didn't seem to make a difference. I don't have body aches, so I guess I don't have the flu? Or, do I have a mild case of the flu because I had the flu shot, and the shot isn't accurate but offers some help in severity?

I watched some anti-vacc'ers on youtube, and their arguments sound good to me.

If you can beat it in a few days, then it probably wasn't a flu. The point of flu shot is not only to protect you but to protect other people, esp those who cannot take the flu shots.
djdestroyer wrote:
Mar 4th, 2019 2:25 am
I only get the flu about 50% of the years. Usually beat it in a couple of days. Until my immune system is compromised, I will be going without flu shot
Deal Addict
Jul 10, 2014
2261 posts
622 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
82 wrote:
Mar 4th, 2019 9:21 am
If you can beat it in a few days, then it probably wasn't a flu. The point of flu shot is not only to protect you but to protect other people, esp those who cannot take the flu shots.
A healthy person should beat the flu in 3-5 days. Yes, you remain infectious up to a week after that. I'm all for vaccinations but not all are created equally... Two shots against measles as a child immunizes you for life. Influenza changes so rapidly that often times, the shot doesn't even contain the correct strain of flu. A lot of people still get sick anyways too. Basically no one still gets measles after the vax. I haven't got the flu the last two years, and this year will make it 3 (fingers crossed). If I was getting the flu every year or if I wasn't healthy, I'd definitely consider it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 10, 2011
1930 posts
616 upvotes
Edmonton
I've gotten it every year for the last few years. Last year was a bit of a whiff in terms of strain selection but this year's shot is pretty decent.

Not sure why you wouldn't in either case. It's free, there are no real side effects, and having a good chance of not getting the flu, getting a less severe case of the flu and/or not passing it on to someone who cannot get the shot is all good stuff.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
5643 posts
760 upvotes
Becks wrote:
Mar 3rd, 2019 8:45 pm
I've been sick the whole week and feel crappy. I had bad sinus pain, my gums and lips were throbbing, and Advil and Emergen-C didn't seem to make a difference. I don't have body aches, so I guess I don't have the flu? Or, do I have a mild case of the flu because I had the flu shot, and the shot isn't accurate but offers some help in severity?

I watched some anti-vacc'ers on youtube, and their arguments sound good to me.
Why would you find antivax vids on YT a good source of information? For someone who isn't informed about the virus, I'm not sure how you'd know that their arguements are sound or not. If you want to try and do your own research, at least make an effort to consult reliable sources of information.

How did you rule out that that weren't affected by parainfluenza, metapneumovirus, RSV, for example? Not every flu-like illness is caused by influenza.
Member
Apr 18, 2017
361 posts
156 upvotes
djdestroyer wrote:
Mar 4th, 2019 2:13 pm
A healthy person should beat the flu in 3-5 days. Yes, you remain infectious up to a week after that. I'm all for vaccinations but not all are created equally... Two shots against measles as a child immunizes you for life. Influenza changes so rapidly that often times, the shot doesn't even contain the correct strain of flu. A lot of people still get sick anyways too. Basically no one still gets measles after the vax. I haven't got the flu the last two years, and this year will make it 3 (fingers crossed). If I was getting the flu every year or if I wasn't healthy, I'd definitely consider it.
Huge breakthrough on the horizon.
Researchers have identified the parts of the virus that are shared across all flu strains and sub-strains capable of infecting humans.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324499.php
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 28, 2006
10053 posts
1530 upvotes
Severe symptoms usually subside after a few days for a healthy person but normally it would take 1-2 weeks to get rid of other cold-like symptoms. Lab test is rarely ordered unless you are admitted to a hospital, so in most cases you really don't know whether you have flu, RSV or other kinds of infections, or even allergic reactions.

For healthy people with flu, they are most contagious in the first few days when they have severe symptoms.

This has been said a few times, flu shot is not perfect but it is still the best option right now. It won't make your immune system weaker, it doesn't cause austism.

djdestroyer wrote:
Mar 4th, 2019 2:13 pm
A healthy person should beat the flu in 3-5 days. Yes, you remain infectious up to a week after that. I'm all for vaccinations but not all are created equally... Two shots against measles as a child immunizes you for life. Influenza changes so rapidly that often times, the shot doesn't even contain the correct strain of flu. A lot of people still get sick anyways too. Basically no one still gets measles after the vax. I haven't got the flu the last two years, and this year will make it 3 (fingers crossed). If I was getting the flu every year or if I wasn't healthy, I'd definitely consider it.
Jr. Member
Aug 7, 2016
117 posts
82 upvotes
https://www.bmj.com/content/360/bmj.k15/rr
OFFICIAL DOUBLETALK HIDES SERIOUS PROBLEMS WITH FLU SHOT SAFETY AND EFFECTIVENESS

After weeks of brooding about the Donahue article linking flu shots to miscarriages (Vaccine 2017;35:5314) it was with a sense of relief that I read Rob Wipond’s narrative of media attempts to sweep a serious vaccine safety issue under the rug….He points out the hypocrisy (his words were “double standard”) of authorities who dismissed the Donahue paper because it was an “observational study.” Year after year they have quoted observational studies to announce, “…80% vaccine effectiveness…60% effectiveness…40% effectiveness…” They do not mention that these studies make no effort to look for adverse vaccine effects (e.g. narcolepsy, seizures, high fever, oculorespiratory syndrome). They do not mention “negative vaccine effectiveness”, the increase in risk of illness from influenza and non-influenza viruses associated with (or caused by) the vaccines. (Cowling, Clin Inf Dis 2012;54:1778) They do not mention that a vaccine “effective” in one season may increase influenza risk in a subsequent season. (Read about “antibody-dependent enhancement” to understand one explanatory mechanism). They do not mention that the observational studies they refer to are likely to exaggerate vaccine effectiveness in the first place because of the “healthy user effect” well known to epidemiologists.

Some history: 1960 Nobel Laureate and a primary developer of today’s influenza vaccine, Macfarlane Burnet, didn’t think it was worth much. (Br J Path 1936:17:282. Natural History of Infectious Disease 1972, page212)….In 2000 Kenneth McIntosh warned that we should not routinely give influenza vaccine to healthy children until multicenter randomized trials were done over several seasons to be sure that it was safe and effective. (Editorial, NEJM 2000;342:225) His advice was ignored….In 2004 a “Seven-Step Recipe” for using the media to boost demand for the vaccine was presented to the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, sponsored by the CDC and the AMA. The recipe included, “…statements of alarm by public health authorities…prediction of dire outcomes from influenza…continued reports that influenza is causing severe illness affecting lots of people…repeated urging of influenza vaccination…” (Doshi, BMJ 2005;331:1419) Sound familiar?

Peter Collignon and his colleagues have said this: “We need much larger, independent, and better-reported prospective studies that clearly demonstrate that the benefits of influenza vaccines in children far outweigh harms…If, overall, the increased number of cases of ARI plus vaccine side effects are much larger (in vaccine recipients) than those on placebo, given the low efficacy of the vaccine, then this is a strong argument against current policies advocating routine influenza vaccination of children.” (Collignon, Clin Inf Dis 2015:60:489)

In any discussion of influenza epidemiology we should acknowledge the careful and steady (one could even say fearless) work of Danuta Skowronski and her Canadian public health colleagues. It was they who found that the 2008-9 flu shot doubled the risk of illness from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic flu. Their observations were considered important enough to alter Canadian vaccine recommendations for the 2009-10 season. However, for some reason, they had a good deal of difficulty getting their study finally published. (Skowronski, PLoS Med 2010;7(4):e1000258) This observational study was a revelation, even a shock, to many public health experts. US officials never publicly acknowledged the findings…..This is just one of a number of important papers published over the years by Skowronski and her colleagues, who have a reputation for high scientific and ethical standards.

Wipond does not mention another technique used to dismiss legitimate vaccine safety concerns, having to do with “statistical significance.” Recently, a large cohort study found that flu shots given during the first trimester of pregnancy were associated with a 20% increase in autism spectrum disorder in the offspring. P for the association was 0.01, and the authors acknowledged that, if it was causal, would mean four(4) additional autism cases for every 1000 mothers vaccinated. However, they incorrectly used a statistical manipulation to adjust the finding into “non-significance.” (Hooker, Donzelli, Zerbo. JAMA Pediatr 2017;171:600) One typical media headline about the study was, “Flu vaccine during pregnancy not linked to autism.” (Shute, NPR, 11/28/16)….This kind of thing goes on all the time with news releases for vaccine research.

The flu season in North America officially began 5 weeks ago, and the vaccine publicity juggernaut is still picking up steam. Manufacturers are hoping to sell 166 million doses in the US this season. One business group predicts an $8 billion US influenza vaccine market by 2025. (Coherent Market Insights, 1/5/18) The 2016-17 vaccine increased the risk of H3N2 illness among UK elderly by 68%, and officials are calling for better vaccines. (Osterholm, NY Times, 1/8/18) Meanwhile, in the absence of any evidence that it would help, officials and ordinary citizens in the US and UK wrangle about flu shot mandates for healthcare workers.

Wipond’s article provided new insight for an old baby doctor who, at one time, was a wholehearted vaccine advocate, but lately has been exasperated by bullying and doubletalk from vaccine authorities. Let us hope that his article helps to sustain an honest discussion about the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccines.

Allan S. Cunningham 1/9/18
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
12583 posts
1951 upvotes
City of Vancouver
I paid out of pocket for all my Twinrex shots, yet I have no immunity to hepatitis as confirmed by bloodwork. Of course I am gonna listen to anti-vacc'ers to hear what they have to say, since I never hear that side of the argument other the autism thing. And, not saying I have the flu as I have no body aches.
De gustibus non est disputandum
Deal Addict
Jul 10, 2014
2261 posts
622 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
82 wrote:
Mar 4th, 2019 11:51 pm
Severe symptoms usually subside after a few days for a healthy person but normally it would take 1-2 weeks to get rid of other cold-like symptoms. Lab test is rarely ordered unless you are admitted to a hospital, so in most cases you really don't know whether you have flu, RSV or other kinds of infections, or even allergic reactions.

For healthy people with flu, they are most contagious in the first few days when they have severe symptoms.

This has been said a few times, flu shot is not perfect but it is still the best option right now. It won't make your immune system weaker, it doesn't cause austism.
Seems like you were hardly replying to me. I never said it makes your immune system weaker and I definitely never said it causes autism. Where the hell did you get all that from? Certainly not my post. And yes, you said 1-2 weeks which perfectly falls in line with my 3-5 days plus a week. If you personally need a test to show that you have the flu then so be it, doesn't mean others can't tell when they have it. I positively know when I have the flu, it's not confusing or ambiguous in the least. Again, I'm not sure if you replied to the right comment...?
Deal Addict
Jul 10, 2014
2261 posts
622 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
qman23 wrote:
Mar 4th, 2019 8:05 pm
Huge breakthrough on the horizon.
Researchers have identified the parts of the virus that are shared across all flu strains and sub-strains capable of infecting humans.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324499.php
Fair enough and thanks for the link but this seems to be "breaking news" so pardon my ignorance on it.

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