Parenting & Family

Young kids with glasses and sports

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 21st, 2017 5:12 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2006
3633 posts
640 upvotes
Toronto

Young kids with glasses and sports

Daughter just got prescribed with far sighted and needs to wear glasses, almost 5 y/o. Has been thinking getting her into sports and activities, aside from those in daycare. But now with the glasses, that kinda derailed the plan.

Anyone have experience? How to keep the glaases on with little kids, safely and still allow them to play?
Say skating or hockey. Is that even possible to not fog up yet make the glasses tight so not to fall down?
19 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 27, 2007
4743 posts
759 upvotes
I played sports with glasses regularly until grade 9 when I got contacts. I wore a band to keep them on for most sports.

A friend of mine had goggles, like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Dont reccomend those.

I cant speak to hockey and fogging up. I never played.

My recomendation would be getting contacts come grade 7/8/9 whenever the kids is responsible enough to get them in and out and cleaned regularly.

If prescription stabalises, laser surgery is also an option at a reasonably young age.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 8, 2008
3526 posts
984 upvotes
Toronto
Google "sport glasses" - I've seen kids wearing them in soccer tournaments, they are usually a little more moulded to the face with a strap to hold them on. For just general playing, I'd get a couple of cheaper pairs and a strap. The 'sport glasses' are needed for tournaments but the same kids often practice just in regular glasses.
Deal Addict
Aug 19, 2013
2387 posts
966 upvotes
They make straps to put on the glasses and even special sports glasses. Many kids who wear glasses play sports. When they are a bit older they can wear contacts
Deal Guru
Aug 26, 2002
10057 posts
2980 upvotes
Toronto, ON
My 6-year-old son wears glasses. He got them when he was 4 and for sports we got him a pair of prescription sports glasses that contours more around the face. He hated them when he played inside a gym because it kept fogging up. He ended up just wearing his regular pair of glasses. We did buy a strap that goes around the back of his head to prevent them from falling off his nose/face. You can get the straps from Walmart for pretty cheap.
Sr. Member
Jan 2, 2015
946 posts
336 upvotes
We havhave lots of friends who's kids play hockey with glasses. There a no fog coating you can get on it
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos.
Jr. Member
Jul 3, 2006
136 posts
16 upvotes
boyohboy wrote:
Sep 12th, 2017 12:51 pm
Daughter just got prescribed with far sighted and needs to wear glasses, almost 5 y/o. Has been thinking getting her into sports and activities, aside from those in daycare. But now with the glasses, that kinda derailed the plan.

Anyone have experience? How to keep the glaases on with little kids, safely and still allow them to play?
Say skating or hockey. Is that even possible to not fog up yet make the glasses tight so not to fall down?
Your daughter probably has nearsighted (not farsighted as you said in the post), so be careful with farsighted / nearsighted when you order prescribed glasses online.
Nearsighted = Can see closer/nearer and blurry when further away
Farsighted = blurry when look at things closer (this usually happens when people getting old)
Member
User avatar
Jun 24, 2005
392 posts
33 upvotes
Richmond Hill
HenryHH wrote: Your daughter probably has nearsighted (not farsighted as you said in the post), so be careful with farsighted / nearsighted when you order prescribed glasses online.
Nearsighted = Can see closer/nearer and blurry when further away
Farsighted = blurry when look at things closer (this usually happens when people getting old)
My 6 yr old son is heavily farsighted (yes farsighted like when you get old). He has little rubber knobs at each arm near the ear to help keep the glasses from slipping off. There are also rubber arm attachments you can get that curves around each ear.
For sports, you might want to get something that attaches to each arm and wraps around the back of the neck.....like a chain or lanyard/strap, so if the glasses fall off, it still hangs around the neck.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2006
3633 posts
640 upvotes
Toronto
Tried having a cheap fancy looking bead string tied on the glasses around the back of neck. Not too helpful, Guess have to try the ones that are tight around the back of neck.

I guess skating/hockey will be the most challenging. Having to wear a full-cage helmet, if the glasses/googles move or fog up, it's very difficult for the kid to fix.
Gona try a dance class this week and see how that goes with the glasses on. Have to say, it's quite disheartening to see my daughter having to wear glasses. She's already behind in other things, and now have yet another thing to worry about. Worse is the prescription is quite big too, so the chance of she outgrowing it is quite slim. Prescription of up to +1.00 to +2.00 may go away as the kid grow.... my kid is +4.00/+5.00... sigh Neutral Face
HenryHH wrote:
Sep 14th, 2017 12:08 pm
Your daughter probably has nearsighted (not farsighted as you said in the post), so be careful with farsighted / nearsighted when you order prescribed glasses online.
Nearsighted = Can see closer/nearer and blurry when further away
Farsighted = blurry when look at things closer (this usually happens when people getting old)
Yes it's farsighted. It's somewhat common kids are born with that, or at least not rare I guess.

Actually farsightedness and old-age eyes (whatever the actual med term is) are different. Old-age eyes is due lost of flexibility (strength) of the optical muscle to control the lenses. And since looking at things in close requires the most work by the muscles (contract the most), old eyes will have problem with that. . Farsightedness is the natural focal point being too far off behind the retina of the eyeballs, often due to the eyeballs being born too short (front to back distance). Kids, with their infinitely good flexibility, can quite easily adjust (involuntarily) at the cost of getting tired faster on the optical muscles. So actually with farsightedness, if you cannot adjust due to lost of flexibility (or had those eye drops in opt office), vision will be blurry for all distances, not just in close.
Jr. Member
Jul 3, 2006
136 posts
16 upvotes
haha I learnt something today. I had always thought the farsightedness in kids is rare and nearsightedness would outnumber that significantly. Boyohboy and rngun, you overturned my thought :)
Deal Addict
Aug 19, 2013
2387 posts
966 upvotes
boyohboy wrote:
Sep 14th, 2017 2:41 pm
Tried having a cheap fancy looking bead string tied on the glasses around the back of neck. Not too helpful, Guess have to try the ones that are tight around the back of neck.

I guess skating/hockey will be the most challenging. Having to wear a full-cage helmet, if the glasses/googles move or fog up, it's very difficult for the kid to fix.
Gona try a dance class this week and see how that goes with the glasses on. Have to say, it's quite disheartening to see my daughter having to wear glasses. She's already behind in other things, and now have yet another thing to worry about. Worse is the prescription is quite big too, so the chance of she outgrowing it is quite slim. Prescription of up to +1.00 to +2.00 may go away as the kid grow.... my kid is +4.00/+5.00... sigh Neutral Face



Yes it's farsighted. It's somewhat common kids are born with that, or at least not rare I guess.

Actually farsightedness and old-age eyes (whatever the actual med term is) are different. Old-age eyes is due lost of flexibility (strength) of the optical muscle to control the lenses. And since looking at things in close requires the most work by the muscles (contract the most), old eyes will have problem with that. . Farsightedness is the natural focal point being too far off behind the retina of the eyeballs, often due to the eyeballs being born too short (front to back distance). Kids, with their infinitely good flexibility, can quite easily adjust (involuntarily) at the cost of getting tired faster on the optical muscles. So actually with farsightedness, if you cannot adjust due to lost of flexibility (or had those eye drops in opt office), vision will be blurry for all distances, not just in close.

Many many kids wear glasses and participate in sports. Get a sports strap. They go around their head not their neck. And glasses are fine for hockey etc. I think you need to get over your preconceived notions. It's really not a big deal wearing glasses.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 29, 2008
2789 posts
208 upvotes
Played somewhat competitive hockey and soccer with coke-bottle thick glasses as a kid - wasn't a big deal. My eyes were constantly getting worse so I basically got two sets of new but cheap glasses every year.

Occasionally one year, with one set of glasses, one of the lenses would pop when I got 'hit' or 'bumped' (it was prior to checking). The lens would just sit near my chin, I would finish my shift, and then pop the lens back in on the bench. After that, my parents made it a point to try for smaller frames and a larger helmet/cage.

One thing that my parents didn't realize though was that kids should wear sunglasses in the sun - I didn't wear sunglasses until high school when I finally got contacts, which ironically was when I pretty much stopped playing sports.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2006
3633 posts
640 upvotes
Toronto
Momof3cuties wrote:
Sep 14th, 2017 6:37 pm

Many many kids wear glasses and participate in sports. Get a sports strap. They go around their head not their neck. And glasses are fine for hockey etc. I think you need to get over your preconceived notions. It's really not a big deal wearing glasses.
Not sure what's "preconceived notions". I use glasses and contacts too. There is not a pair of glasses that will ever be as comfortable as not having to wear one to see clearly. It's always going to be an annoying aspect, more so in active activities.
random pattern wrote:
Sep 14th, 2017 7:48 pm
Played somewhat competitive hockey and soccer with coke-bottle thick glasses as a kid - wasn't a big deal. My eyes were constantly getting worse so I basically got two sets of new but cheap glasses every year.

Occasionally one year, with one set of glasses, one of the lenses would pop when I got 'hit' or 'bumped' (it was prior to checking). The lens would just sit near my chin, I would finish my shift, and then pop the lens back in on the bench. After that, my parents made it a point to try for smaller frames and a larger helmet/cage.

One thing that my parents didn't realize though was that kids should wear sunglasses in the sun - I didn't wear sunglasses until high school when I finally got contacts, which ironically was when I pretty much stopped playing sports.
Thanks. So were you using just regular glasses or those sports glasses that're more wrap around the eyes?

Hah I was actually considering getting transitional lenses for the kid... but then the may be really weird every time the kids in day care go play outdoor and she's the only one with "sunglasses" on. Other kids may start fighting over it lol. Will probably get a second pair with transitional lenses for weekend uses.
Member
User avatar
Jun 24, 2005
392 posts
33 upvotes
Richmond Hill
boyohboy wrote:
Sep 14th, 2017 2:41 pm
I guess skating/hockey will be the most challenging. Having to wear a full-cage helmet, if the glasses/googles move or fog up, it's very difficult for the kid to fix.
My son does fine skating with a helmet by NOT wearing glasses. IIRC, his prescription is +3.25.

Top