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Locked: "Your call may be monitor/recorded for quality assurance purposes"

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  • Apr 22nd, 2011 11:54 pm
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Deal Addict
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Aug 23, 2007
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"Your call may be monitor/recorded for quality assurance purposes"

When you call any large corporations, upon waiting to speak with a live representative, you might get a "Your call may be monitor/recorded for quality assurance purposes".... what does it really mean?

I understand that telephone recording cannot be used in court unless you received permission from the other party. If you stay on the line after the above disclaimer, does it mean that you have accepted the fact that the call is monitor/recorded, and you have waived your legal rights to dispute the recording as evidence of your conversation?

My thinking is that you have agreed to be recorded only for "quality assurance purposes" and they still cannot use the recording against you in any way.

Thoughts?
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Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2007
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Takami wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 8:55 am

I understand that telephone recording cannot be used in court unless you received permission from the other party.

I'm not sure why you think that, but it's incorrect. One of the parties involved has to be aware of the recording unless there is a court order in place allowing the recording but you don't need permission of both parties to record the conversation.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 26, 2007
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???
In Canada only one party needs to be informed that the call is recorded, in this case you and the operator both know.

The recording itself won't be used in court, however the transcript of the recording would be.
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Sep 24, 2005
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the recorded material is used to audit call centre reps.
reps are graded on ramdom calls.
exceptionally good or bad recorded calls are used to train new reps.
trainees and managers can also listen to live calls, again for training and auditing purposes.
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Oct 30, 2008
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The purpose of recording calls isd to be able to either depend or punish your CSR reps. If a client calls about an issue that was never solved or something to that affect. They will look at the w/o and have it escalated. If the client says that they said something and it was not recorded, you can go back and listen to the call and revise what was said and what was recorded. This helps when you need to explain what happened to a senior official if the issue gets escalated to them.
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May 17, 2007
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Burnaby
Those recordings worked to my advantage a couple of years ago. I was with Bhell for my cell contract, and had a family share plan. I called in asking to cancel the 2nd line, because it wasn't being used much, contract was over, and the Csr argued with me for 10 minutes. I kept saying "just cancel the line, and change my package to a single plan please". He kept insisting I should keep the 2-line. I got fed up, and hung up.

Sure enough, next billing date: not only did I still have billing for 2 phones, I also had 2 seperate packages :facepalm: . Got on the horn to Bell to escalate it. The call centre manager assured me he would investigate, and listen to the recorded conversation. 3 days later, I got a call back from him telling me he was sorry they messed up, he had now cancelled the 2nd package, and gave me a $100 credit for my inconvenience. So these annoying recording have benefits.

In the end though, a few months later, I paid out my contract and moved to Telus :razz:
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Dec 24, 2008
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When dealing with anything contractual on the phone I ALWAYS ask that the call be recorded, and a note put in my file that I requested it - it's protection for you.
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May 4, 2010
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vaportech wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 9:22 am
In Canada only one party needs to be informed that the call is recorded, in this case you and the operator both know.

The recording itself won't be used in court, however the transcript of the recording would be.

Why only one party?

Does that mean I'm legally allowed to call up someone and record the conversation without informing him?
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Jan 13, 2005
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The calls are used in employee training and evaluation. The recording are not kept very long either.
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Mar 25, 2005
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bullionaire wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 1:21 pm
Why only one party?

Does that mean I'm legally allowed to call up someone and record the conversation without informing him?

Yes.
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Dec 30, 2006
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Takami wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 8:55 am
When you call any large corporations, upon waiting to speak with a live representative, you might get a "Your call may be monitor/recorded for quality assurance purposes".... what does it really mean?

I understand that telephone recording cannot be used in court unless you received permission from the other party. If you stay on the line after the above disclaimer, does it mean that you have accepted the fact that the call is monitor/recorded, and you have waived your legal rights to dispute the recording as evidence of your conversation?

My thinking is that you have agreed to be recorded only for "quality assurance purposes" and they still cannot use the recording against you in any way.

Thoughts?


As a former Quality Analyst, I can say the calls are recorded so they can be pulled up randomly to ensure proper procedure and policies are being followed and communicated. Also to ensure proper treatment towards customers. The calls are not used against customers. The only time calls are pulled for review later is if the customer makes a claim against a call rep and it is needed to be verified. Otherwise calls are only used in court if they are subpoenaed.

If you do not want to be recorded, you can ask not to be and you will be transferred to a line that is not recorded.
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Dec 30, 2006
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nano wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 1:29 pm
The calls are used in employee training and evaluation. The recording are not kept very long either.
incorrect. The calls are kept for a few months and can be kept forever if needed.
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Apr 4, 2010
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bullionaire wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 1:21 pm
Why only one party?

Does that mean I'm legally allowed to call up someone and record the conversation without informing him?

Exactly. You can record whoever you want, whenever you want! :)

...it might come handy, you never know!
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jacksorbetta wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 12:46 pm
Those recordings worked to my advantage a couple of years ago. I was with Bhell for my cell contract, and had a family share plan. I called in asking to cancel the 2nd line, because it wasn't being used much, contract was over, and the Csr argued with me for 10 minutes. I kept saying "just cancel the line, and change my package to a single plan please". He kept insisting I should keep the 2-line. I got fed up, and hung up.

Sure enough, next billing date: not only did I still have billing for 2 phones, I also had 2 seperate packages :facepalm: . Got on the horn to Bell to escalate it. The call centre manager assured me he would investigate, and listen to the recorded conversation. 3 days later, I got a call back from him telling me he was sorry they messed up, he had now cancelled the 2nd package, and gave me a $100 credit for my inconvenience. So these annoying recording have benefits.

In the end though, a few months later, I paid out my contract and moved to Telus :razz:

+1
I used the recording when I had billing issues with Bell. They insisted one thing, I told them to check the recording, sure enough they were wrong. I think Bell has to have the worst policies/customer service in the entire telcom industry.
That's the end of my rant.
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May 4, 2010
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Gdc wrote:
Apr 22nd, 2011 2:20 pm
Exactly. You can record whoever you want, whenever you want! :)

...it might come handy, you never know!

Thanks!

Has the law changed or something, though?

I thought you had to inform the other party to record the conversation all this time.
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