Health & Wellness

1 in 13 Canadian men and 16 women are getting colorectal cancer!

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  • Aug 18th, 2019 5:21 pm
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1 in 13 Canadian men and 16 women are getting colorectal cancer!

https://www.narcity.com/news/ca/colorec ... al-mystery


First of all, I thought that is a rather crass term for a headline. I’m lost to come up with another term to describe it though. Colorectal cancer?

Just read the article and it’s saying excessive weight gain is the link.
Last edited by Mars2012 on Aug 4th, 2019 12:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: edited term for one more suitable
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Supercooled wrote: https://www.narcity.com/news/ca/colorec ... al-mystery


First of all, I thought that is a rather crass term for a headline. I’m lost to come up with another term to describe it though. Colorectal cancer?

Just read the article and it’s saying excessive weight gain is the link.
How about calling a spade a spade? Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes Colorectal cancer was mentioned several times in the article.
Last edited by Mars2012 on Aug 4th, 2019 12:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: edit in quote
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You can be thin and get colorectal cancer, fyi. The article, tho, highlights the "mysterious" trend of colorectal cancer increases in ppl under 50. it has been the case that it is rare for ppl in that age group to get it. That is why testing doesn't start until age 50, unless there is family history, and that depends on what age the family members had the cancer. I dunno why they didn't look at the obvious cause, in my opinion: the high protein diet trend.
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High protein diets are a challenge.

I found my blood sugar rose when I introduce more than a moderate amount of protein while on keto. My body was using a starvation mechanism to convert the protein into carbohydrates.

Word to the wise, do not increase your protein intake substantially unless you're increasing your physical activity (and in particular, resistance and weight training) to match this increase.
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redflagdealsguy wrote: High protein diets are a challenge.

I found my blood sugar rose when I introduce more than a moderate amount of protein while on keto. My body was using a starvation mechanism to convert the protein into carbohydrates.

Word to the wise, do not increase your protein intake substantially unless you're increasing your physical activity (and in particular, resistance and weight training) to match this increase.
You have to tell me the chemical conversion of protein into carbohydrate. I thought that was not possible. What starving your body of carbs does cause the fat cells to get disgested and break down (hence the ketones). Excess protein is more likely to end up in the form of gout.

As far as colorectal cancer, it may be higher meat consumption but I think it it something else. One study they used was to compare populations of ethnic Japanese - one in Japan that consumes little red meat and one in Hawaii that consumes a lot more. They found that the population in Hawaii had a higher cancer rate (have a friend who is of that group but his ancestors who developed CR cancer did so in their 8th decade). I think it is higher consumption of nitrites (converts into nitrosamines when combined with proteins in the meat-curing process - Nitrosamines are carcinogenic). Spam masubi, anyone?
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This is what happens when your diet is full of garbage food. Everyone needs to return to a more traditional pre-industrial diet with less meat, dairy, and processed food, like what's spelled out in the new food guide.
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thriftshopper wrote: You have to tell me the chemical conversion of protein into carbohydrate. I thought that was not possible. What starving your body of carbs does cause the fat cells to get disgested and break down (hence the ketones). Excess protein is more likely to end up in the form of gout.

As far as colorectal cancer, it may be higher meat consumption but I think it it something else. One study they used was to compare populations of ethnic Japanese - one in Japan that consumes little red meat and one in Hawaii that consumes a lot more. They found that the population in Hawaii had a higher cancer rate (have a friend who is of that group but his ancestors who developed CR cancer did so in their 8th decade). I think it is higher consumption of nitrites (converts into nitrosamines when combined with proteins in the meat-curing process - Nitrosamines are carcinogenic). Spam masubi, anyone?
Gluconeogenesis
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Honest question: are you currently overweight or carrying more than 8-12% body fat?
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thriftshopper wrote: You have to tell me the chemical conversion of protein into carbohydrate. I thought that was not possible. What starving your body of carbs does cause the fat cells to get disgested and break down (hence the ketones). Excess protein is more likely to end up in the form of gout.

As far as colorectal cancer, it may be higher meat consumption but I think it it something else. One study they used was to compare populations of ethnic Japanese - one in Japan that consumes little red meat and one in Hawaii that consumes a lot more. They found that the population in Hawaii had a higher cancer rate (have a friend who is of that group but his ancestors who developed CR cancer did so in their 8th decade). I think it is higher consumption of nitrites (converts into nitrosamines when combined with proteins in the meat-curing process - Nitrosamines are carcinogenic). Spam masubi, anyone?
There are higher levels of nitrates in vegetables than there are in processed meats.
One serving of arugula has more than does 400 hotdogs.
both are dwarfed by the amount of nitrate made by your own saliva.
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Piro21 wrote: This is what happens when your diet is full of garbage food. Everyone needs to return to a more traditional pre-industrial diet with less meat, dairy, and processed food, like what's spelled out in the new food guide.
depends on what specific pre-industrial area you're talking about, but almost none in northern climates had any regular fruit or vegetable intake in their diets.

And many cultures were very meat and dairy heavy ie. Scottish highlanders.
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Piro21 wrote: This is what happens when your diet is full of garbage food. Everyone needs to return to a more traditional pre-industrial diet with less meat, dairy, and processed food, like what's spelled out in the new food guide.
You mean the new food guide that contradicts the previous food guide.... which contradict the food guide that came before that? At least the current one looks the least influenced by various food lobbyists.
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joeyjoejoe wrote: You mean the new food guide that contradicts the previous food guide.... which contradict the food guide that came before that? At least the current one looks the least influenced by various food lobbyists.
Yep. The one with less lobbying than ever, and more based in science than the needs of a supply management cartel.
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My dad died of this in 1987, he was 66 years old.
My mom died of the same, nine years later, when she was 69. She lasted only six weeks after diagnosis and treatment.
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Tceight wrote: depends on what specific pre-industrial area you're talking about, but almost none in northern climates had any regular fruit or vegetable intake in their diets.

And many cultures were very meat and dairy heavy ie. Scottish highlanders.
People didn’t die of this in the pre-industrial age because their lifespan was much shorter. Pre 1900 the life expectancy was 55 years, now it’s close to 80.
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ProductGuy wrote: People didn’t die of this in the pre-industrial age because their lifespan was much shorter. Pre 1900 the life expectancy was 55 years, now it’s close to 80.
Different discussion, nothing to do with my post.
I was speaking to Piro21's understanding of what pre-industrial diets were composed of.

but now that you brought it up, what was the average lifespan when you subtract infant mortalities?
The life expectancy at age 5 was 75 for men and 73 for women during the mid-Victorian period (1837-1901).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2625386/
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Tceight wrote: There are higher levels of nitrates in vegetables than there are in processed meats.
One serving of arugula has more than does 400 hotdogs.
both are dwarfed by the amount of nitrate made by your own saliva.
The nitrites by themselves are fine (I do realise that celery salts/extracts are full of nitrites, and is used by bacon processors to say their bacon doesn't use "nitrite"). It's when they're used to cure meats which forms nitrosamines is when it becomes a problem. The North American diet probably consists of a lot more meat cured with nitrites.
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Tceight wrote: depends on what specific pre-industrial area you're talking about, but almost none in northern climates had any regular fruit or vegetable intake in their diets.

And many cultures were very meat and dairy heavy ie. Scottish highlanders.
I agree, it depends by era. I'm thinking more end of the 19th century pre-industrial. Many cultures were restricted by environmental factors, but by and large they were healthier than we are now.
Tceight wrote: Different discussion, nothing to do with my post.
I was speaking to Piro21's understanding of what pre-industrial diets were composed of.

but now that you brought it up, what was the average lifespan when you subtract infant mortalities?
The life expectancy at age 5 was 75 for men and 73 for women during the mid-Victorian period (1837-1901).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2625386/
That's without modern medicine, too. Removing the negative effects of the modern diet while keeping the positive effects of the medicine that's been offsetting it would lead to much better outcomes for pretty much everyone everywhere.
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medicine is an industry, and you are both the product and the customer of that industry.
dietary advice follows in the same vein, where the most profitable and fungible foodstuffs are those that will be presented as most desirable.
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You can't go wrong reading the excellent series of books, especially "Foods That Fight Cancer: Preventing Cancer Through Diet" by cancer researchers Richard Beliveau, Ph.D. & Denis Gingras, Ph.D at the University of Quebec at Montreal.

Try your local library system first.
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Becks wrote: Ya, change ur diet out of necessity.... stop eating pork chops.
Supercooled wrote: ...Not sure what you’re getting at but lean pork loin is delicious. Cheaper than chicken and beef and delicious. Did I mention it’s delicious? For a life long meat eater it’s intractable to just stop cold turkey...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork._T ... White_Meat
"Pork. The Other White Meat." was an advertising slogan developed by advertising agency Bozell, Jacobs, Kenyon & Eckhardt in 1987 for the [US] National Pork Board. The campaign was paid for using a checkoff fee (tax) collected from the initial sale of all pigs and pork products, including imports. In traditional culinary terminology, pork is considered a white meat, but the nutritional studies comparing white and red meat treat pork as red, as does the United States Department of Agriculture...
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