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14 years old electric hot water tank - replace or not?

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 18th, 2021 11:22 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
294 upvotes
Vancouver

14 years old electric hot water tank - replace or not?

It's at my rental townhouse.

I cannot monitor this closely. It's been functioning fine.

I flushed it twice before...i didn't replace the anode rod. Therefore, it's likely not in the best shape.

Should I replace it? or should i wait until it malfunction and then replace it?
10 replies
Banned
Mar 2, 2021
252 posts
260 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: It's at my rental townhouse.

I cannot monitor this closely. It's been functioning fine.

I flushed it twice before...i didn't replace the anode rod. Therefore, it's likely not in the best shape.

Should I replace it? or should i wait until it malfunction and then replace it?
You can delay replacing until you start seeing water leaking. But you would need to monitor this at least once weekly. Hot water tanks will not spontaneously implode, so don't need to be afraid. But be ready to replace as soon as it starts leaking.

I replaced mine after 16 years and it was purely by personal choice because I had extra money and got a good deal at the time.

But, if this is a rental, wouldn't your landlord need to replace this?
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
294 upvotes
Vancouver
I am the landlord, so its my responsibility to replace it if needed.

I dont think the tenant will monitor this tank.

I should add the tank is located near the garage with drain next to it.....even if it leaks, it shoudltn cause damage

Mariusic wrote: You can delay replacing until you start seeing water leaking. But you would need to monitor this at least once weekly. Hot water tanks will not spontaneously implode, so don't need to be afraid. But be ready to replace as soon as it starts leaking.

I replaced mine after 16 years and it was purely by personal choice because I had extra money and got a good deal at the time.

But, if this is a rental, wouldn't your landlord need to replace this?
Banned
Mar 2, 2021
252 posts
260 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: I am the landlord, so its my responsibility to replace it if needed.

I dont think the tenant will monitor this tank.

I should add the tank is located near the garage with drain next to it.....even if it leaks, it shoudltn cause damage
Oh, then in that situation might as well do it the next time you find a good deal to buy/install. That's what I did when I got to 16 years, I said might as well take advantage of that.
Sr. Member
Oct 19, 2020
692 posts
430 upvotes
GTA
If there's a floor drain around the tank I would leave it alone until it starts leaking.
You can get a flood alarm if you're so worried.

14 years isn't overly old.
Deal Addict
Feb 10, 2006
2445 posts
442 upvotes
Kitchener
Does water actually flow to the drain? I've seen many times where the drain is slightly higher and water will flow the other direction. Does your tenants have any boxes or belongings that can get wet? Is the potential savings worth the worry, tenants have no hot water, or trying to claim that something got ruined?

I'd personally keep an eye out for a price you felt was suitable and make the change. Peace of mind is worth more than a few bucks.

Ps. Occasionally water tanks have significant ruptures. They don't always just have drips when they go.
Deal Addict
Jun 14, 2008
3387 posts
2190 upvotes
Montreal
Your would have no anode left at 14 years. If you don't want to replace it at least put a new one in.
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
294 upvotes
Vancouver
The water tank is located within a tiny room in an enclosed space in the garage.

That room has concrete rough floor and a drain nearby......risk of damage from leak should be fairly low under normal circumstances.

Will keep an eye in my next visit to the townhouse
Double_J wrote: Does water actually flow to the drain? I've seen many times where the drain is slightly higher and water will flow the other direction. Does your tenants have any boxes or belongings that can get wet? Is the potential savings worth the worry, tenants have no hot water, or trying to claim that something got ruined?

I'd personally keep an eye out for a price you felt was suitable and make the change. Peace of mind is worth more than a few bucks.

Ps. Occasionally water tanks have significant ruptures. They don't always just have drips when they go.
Deal Guru
May 1, 2012
10015 posts
9725 upvotes
Markham
It aint broken, just ride it till it dies.

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