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1st meeting w/ recruiter

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[OP]
Member
Oct 27, 2013
287 posts
77 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA

1st meeting w/ recruiter

Hi everyone. I was contacted by an executive recruiter the other day and we have a call to review an opportunity he has. I never have worked with a recruiter before.

What should I expect in this meeting? Should I be treating this the same as a formal interview or is it more casual?

Can you share any tips that would help me? Thanks
20 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 30, 2003
1553 posts
81 upvotes
I would do something in between. There are a couple of questions you should discuss them though.

1. Is the position you are discussing a direct hire or contract
2. Relationship/representation only last for this specific role for this specific company (in no way are they allowed to forward you to any company without your consent)
...life is nothing more than a journey through the consequences of our actions...

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Aug 27, 2020
33 posts
25 upvotes
Greater Toronto Area
The first phone call is much more casual than an interview. The recruiter will ask some information about your background and see if there is a fit with the role they are trying to fill. I also want to see a job description and the name of the company. You can do your own due diligence prior to moving forward. If you are interested obviously they want an update resume. Good luck and please provide an update so it helps others out there.

Thanks
Last edited by blacklivesmatter on Apr 16th, 2021 10:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
Sr. Member
Jun 3, 2006
768 posts
182 upvotes
Markham
I agree with the comments above. I would also advise to not set your expectations too high. IMO, 3rd party executive recruiters are the scumbags of the HR function - like bounty hunters in Star Wars, lol. I can't count the number of times where they've reached out, we've set up a time to chat, and they no show while ghosting me entirely.
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Mar 7, 2007
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SW20 MR2 wrote: I agree with the comments above. I would also advise to not set your expectations too high. IMO, 3rd party executive recruiters are the scumbags of the HR function - like bounty hunters in Star Wars, lol. I can't count the number of times where they've reached out, we've set up a time to chat, and they no show while ghosting me entirely.
100% correct. Usually a very scumbag-like attitude under a professional manner.

I have never, ever gotten any job from a recruiter. In my experience, they are useless (based on my results of zero offers). But I have been forced to deal with them, once in a while, over the years, because some of these companies are well established (have connections with certain employers).
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2010
5910 posts
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Toronto
motomondo wrote: 100% correct. Usually a very scumbag-like attitude under a professional manner.

I have never, ever gotten any job from a recruiter. In my experience, they are useless (based on my results of zero offers). But I have been forced to deal with them, once in a while, over the years, because some of these companies are well established (have connections with certain employers).
From my perspective, if they're reaching out to me, that means they need me more than I need them. I humour them if I feel like it, but I don't get invested at all. I'm not going to start jumping up and down excited for whatever opportunity they want to present.
[OP]
Member
Oct 27, 2013
287 posts
77 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
blacklivesmatter wrote: The first phone call is much more casual than an interview. The recruiter will ask some information about your background and see if there is a fit with the role they are trying to fill. I also want to see a job description and the name of the company. You can do your own due diligence prior to moving forward. If you are interested obviously they want an update resume. Good luck and please provide an update so it helps others out there.

Thanks
This is exactly what happened. Company name and description of company and role provided. He asked some questions and asked if I’m interested to send in my resume. Wasn’t pushy and was professional. Very forthcoming with info.
Deal Addict
Sep 20, 2014
1456 posts
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Toronto, ON, CA
Manatus wrote: From my perspective, if they're reaching out to me, that means they need me more than I need them. I humour them if I feel like it, but I don't get invested at all. I'm not going to start jumping up and down excited for whatever opportunity they want to present.
Wrong on so many fronts.
Sometimes they use people as a filler candidate to make their top candidate look better, so joke is on you.
Also, don't burn bridges like that, get over yourself. Imagine if you need their help one day, that attitude won't help you...karma is a b*****.
Sr. Member
Feb 10, 2008
644 posts
293 upvotes
Toronto
I've got 3 of my last 4 jobs from a third party recruiter. I think they are good for more senior type roles. I've had others flake on me as well of course, but if they determine you are a good fit for the role I'd actually prefer to go with a recruiter rather than direct with the company HR. There are some advantages in the sense that you can be very upfront about salary and benefits expectations, and the type of work environment you are looking for, and they basically do the negotiation for you.

The recruiter doesn't always know a whole lot about the company specifically, but I've received some good tips from the recruiters and if they've worked with the company for a long time often have a good idea of the type of people they like to hire and can give you areas of your experience to emphasize in the interviews.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2010
5910 posts
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Toronto
2009M5 wrote: Wrong on so many fronts.
Sometimes they use people as a filler candidate to make their top candidate look better, so joke is on you.
Also, don't burn bridges like that, get over yourself. Imagine if you need their help one day, that attitude won't help you...karma is a b*****.
It's not meant to be an attitude, no offense intended. All I'm saying is it's not the regular recruiter situation where I'm unemployed and begging for work. If I'm working somewhere, I'm perfectly happy to keep working there, so I'll listen but I'm not going to jump all over the opportunity and get all worked up.
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Mar 7, 2007
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2009M5 wrote: Wrong on so many fronts.
Sometimes they use people as a filler candidate to make their top candidate look better, so joke is on you.
Also, don't burn bridges like that, get over yourself. Imagine if you need their help one day, that attitude won't help you...karma is a b*****.
First you say that the recruiters and similar types use a candidate as disposable filler, for their own purposes...

Then you say, "don't burn bridges, be nice to them..."

Whaaaat?
Deal Addict
Sep 20, 2014
1456 posts
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Toronto, ON, CA
motomondo wrote: First you say that the recruiters and similar types use a candidate as disposable filler, for their own purposes...

Then you say, "don't burn bridges, be nice to them..."

Whaaaat?
Well the recruiter isn’t going to say to your face that you’re the filler candidate.
Regardless, never burn a job lead, you never when you will need that person.

🤦🏽‍♂️
Deal Addict
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Mar 7, 2007
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Should we start a new thread for the worst recruiters in Canada?

I have a candidate: Teamit Inc. Please save your time, they don't respect the candidates (didn't show up to the scheduled call) avoid them!! https://teamit.com/

Maybe I should start another thread with the details of what happened.
Sr. Member
Jun 3, 2006
768 posts
182 upvotes
Markham
It's easier to start a list for the best recruiters cause it's less work. :D
Member
Aug 15, 2018
309 posts
108 upvotes
Recruiters are sales guys, even though they are called fancy names sometimes. They are not necessarily here to help you, but help themselves get commissions by placing you with one of the companies they are working with. Keep your own interests on top of the conversation at all times, not the recruiter's interests.
Member
Aug 15, 2018
309 posts
108 upvotes
SW20 MR2 wrote: I agree with the comments above. I would also advise to not set your expectations too high. IMO, 3rd party executive recruiters are the scumbags of the HR function - like bounty hunters in Star Wars, lol. I can't count the number of times where they've reached out, we've set up a time to chat, and they no show while ghosting me entirely.
Well they are not "HR", that's the catch. Most agency recruiters don't have HR background. They are sales guys, it's a commissions based job, nothing HR-related. The more people they speak to, the more chances they have to close a deal and make money. Giving a feedback to people they contact isn't exactly their priority. Most recruiters don't know much about the roles they are hiring for, they just match keywords and job titles with job descriptions and try to sell the Cvs they found online to their clients. "Headhunter" is basically a fancy name for "I look for Cvs online and arrange interviews".
Sr. Member
Jun 3, 2006
768 posts
182 upvotes
Markham
I don't care what their function or background is. In any job - hell, in life in general - if you specifically reach out to a person (not them reaching out to you) and you set up a specific date/time to chat, you either show up or let the person know that you aren't. Secondly, if at the end of the call, you say that you will get back to them later, do it. If you notice that they're not a fit while on the call, tell them there and then so that there are no further expectations.

This has nothing to do with feedback. This is about common courtesy, and there are too many scumbags out there.
mattnew wrote: Well they are not "HR", that's the catch. Most agency recruiters don't have HR background. They are sales guys, it's a commissions based job, nothing HR-related. The more people they speak to, the more chances they have to close a deal and make money. Giving a feedback to people they contact isn't exactly their priority. Most recruiters don't know much about the roles they are hiring for, they just match keywords and job titles with job descriptions and try to sell the Cvs they found online to their clients. "Headhunter" is basically a fancy name for "I look for Cvs online and arrange interviews".
Member
Aug 15, 2018
309 posts
108 upvotes
SW20 MR2 wrote: I don't care what their function or background is. In any job - hell, in life in general - if you specifically reach out to a person (not them reaching out to you) and you set up a specific date/time to chat, you either show up or let the person know that you aren't. Secondly, if at the end of the call, you say that you will get back to them later, do it. If you notice that they're not a fit while on the call, tell them there and then so that there are no further expectations.

This has nothing to do with feedback. This is about common courtesy, and there are too many scumbags out there.
It has everything to do with feedback, as it is part of the job if they were doing it properly. When recruiting, you will have successful and unsuccessful candidates. All of them must be updated on the status of their application/chats at the very least when the role closes. This is basic respect.

The problem is that "headhunters" just don't want to take the time to do it, as they don't really care of updating people (it doesn't make them any money). They could do it though, as today most recruitment systems have an option to "bulk update/reply" to all candidates. They really just don't care, it's that simple. If the recruiter really is a douchebag and doesn't answer your calls or refuse to communicate after saying he will update you, you can always find his boss on LinkedIn and have a talk about it. Agencies need candidates more than people need agencies. Especially for senior roles where communication is key. Senior candidates that agencies are trying to place are also likely to be future clients - hence most agencies managers won't really appreciate if one of their "headhunters" behave poorly.

People have to understand that agency recruiters are the same as car dealers. Actually car dealers know about cars, but recruiters mostly don't know about the role or company they are recruiting for, they are just sales guys.

My suggestion to anyone who is looking for work through a recruiter would be to take it for what it is, and:

- Understand they might call you and never update you again
- Understand they might try to sell you a company/job really hard just because they are making a higher commission if they place you with a certain client compared to another
- Understand they might only have a couple of clients but will tell you "the market is not hiring" when they have no idea of the market at all
- Understand they might push you down on salary level, so they can sell you as an experience candidate for cheap to a client, therefore meeting their sales quota for the month
- Understand your interests are not their concerns, they are here to meet sales quota and sell you a job perhaps you didn't initially want
- Understand they will do anything for you to start the new job faster

Understanding the above - someone looking for a job should be able to tell when a recruiter is being too "sales-y" and able to push back if and where needed.
Member
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Oct 16, 2013
233 posts
77 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Abacus1010 wrote: What should I expect in this meeting? Should I be treating this the same as a formal interview or is it more casual?
Assuming this is a recruiter working with an agency and not employed by the company. If so, I'd go with casual.

Just be relaxed and you should be the one asking the questions. What's the company like? How much do they know about culture? Compensation, benefits, etc.

Most executive recruiters that I've dealt with are quite professional and really know their stuff. I also do NOT respond to recruiters who do not provide enough information in the first contact such as "Saw your profile on LI. Please email copy of resume for a role I think you'd be a good fit for."
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"If computers get too powerful, we can organize them into committees. That'll do them in."
Deal Addict
Jan 17, 2009
3277 posts
3224 upvotes
Toronto, Ontario
lol I just met with a recruiter and I was in my t-shirt and sweater... Who cares if they're not the with company that's hiring me, they're just trying to get a commission from recommending me.

He basically couldn't tell me anything other than what was in the job posting, so pretty much useless. From what I've heard some are better than others.

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