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2015 Tesla Model S P85D -- Maintenance and Repair Costs?

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2015 Tesla Model S P85D -- Maintenance and Repair Costs?

Hi Everyone!

My neighbour is buying a new P100D and has offered me his 2015 Tesla Model S P85D (with "Ludicrous Mode" for 2.8 second 0-60) at the trade-in-amount plus the HST advantage he would have received (i.e. $51,770 + $6,730 = $58,500). Unfortunately, I'd have to pay HST on the $58,500 because Tesla won't facilitate a trade-in with a private buyer already identified. Compared to anything I see on AutoTrader, this is a great deal and I know that be absolutely babied it. The car has about 110,000 kms on the odometer and the only issue that he's had in four years required a $150 part. It's been extremely reliable for him (and he's very particular, so he would report even the smallest issue). We went for a ride on the weekend and when he punched the throttle unexpectedly at a light, I nearly had a heart attack -- it accelerates like my sport bike!

I believe that some of the poor reliability reports online for the Model S online relate to the earlier models (2012/13) when they were ironing out the details of the new model. I'm on my third BMW so I'm no stranger to repairs, but how would the 2015 Model S compare? The drivetrain and battery are still warrantied for another 4 years, but it's everything else (suspension, electronics, brakes, etc.) that I'd have to pay for out of pocket. Is there a site or something with common repair costs? Are there big-ticket items that commonly fail that could cost me $1000s? I see REALLY high mileage Model S's out there (250K+ kms) and I also see Teslas being used as service vehicles which would indicate to me that the maintenance can't be THAT bad?

Also, does anyone have a guess at what a 2015 Model S would resalte for in 4 years from now (i.e. an 8yo model with about 170K) when I consider buying my neghbour's new P100D? :)

Thanks!
Last edited by VifferFun on Jun 3rd, 2019 1:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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I expect resale will be pretty low in 4 years, with all of the newer electrics coming out, but it also depends on how Tesla does. It's kinda like buying a used cell phone. The tech changes pretty quickly, though Tesla is pretty much the most advanced at the moment.

What is the trade in price?
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VifferFun wrote: Hi Everyone!

My neighbour is buying a new P100D and has offered me his 2015 Tesla Model S P85D (with "Ludicrous Mode" for 2.8 second 0-60) at the trade-in-amount plus HST. Compared to anything I see on AutoTrader, this is a great deal and I know that be absolutely babied it. The car has about 110,000 kms on the odometer and the only issue that he's had in four years required a $150 part. It's been extremely reliable for him (and he's very particular, so he would report even the smallest issue). We went for a ride on the weekend and when he punched the throttle unexpectedly at a light, I nearly had a heart attack -- it accelerates like my sport bike!

I believe that some of the poor reliability reports online for the Model S online relate to the earlier models (2012/13) when they were ironing out the details of the new model. I'm on my third BMW so I'm no stranger to repairs, but how would the 2015 Model S compare? The drivetrain and battery are still warrantied for another 4 years, but it's everything else (suspension, electronics, brakes, etc.) that I'd have to pay for out of pocket. Is there a site or something with common repair costs? Are there big-ticket items that commonly fail that could cost me $1000s? I see REALLY high mileage Model S's out there (250K+ kms) and I also see Teslas being used as service vehicles which would indicate to me that the maintenance can't be THAT bad?

Also, does anyone have a guess at what a 2015 Model S would resalte for in 4 years from now (i.e. an 8yo model with about 170K) when I consider buying my neghbour's new P100D? :)

Thanks!
All that info and you dont tell us how much hes asking? LOL

How can we tell you how much it will be worth in 4 years if you did not tell us the price he is asking today?
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Kinda hard to judge the maintenance cost since most tesla are under warranty, last time i checked the hourly rate is about $170/h so that is still not saying much. While you may get the impression that it costs more than gas vehicle but it should have less issues. 85D and 100D have difference of 15kWh of battery, seems rather minimal upgrade, kinda like iPhones.
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you may also want to find out how much will Tesla charge for any software update (unless it's free ?)
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And what IF Tesla is no longer around? I guess you can just put it in the desk drawer like old cellphones lol
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booblehead wrote: you may also want to find out how much will Tesla charge for any software update (unless it's free ?)
i also think that year also has the transferable super charging included free for life ! thats what i would want if i ever bought tesla
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There’s a difference between maintenance and repair costs. Maintenance is required stuff to keep a vehicle running meaning brakes, tires, oil changes, those sort of things. Repairs are things not normally replaced that need to be replace when “broken” essentially non wear and tear items.

Since electric vehicles are low maintenance, because no ICE. You’re limited to brakes, tires, wipers and suspension. So already it’s beating your BMW which would require engine maintenance. Also electrics use the drivetrain to capture brake force to regen battery, thus saves your brake components and extends life thus your maintenance ask goes down from a comparable ICE.

You’ll get fuel savings which would also offset the higher purchase price of an electric. Since fuel is a fixed cost, meaning the difference of price of fuel (gas vs electric) would change depending on the market, but your distance driven wouldn’t change, meaning you will get from point a to b regardless if electric or gas. Thus the $/km for fuel would change because your now paying electric and not gas.

Since it’s used it’s also a good deal, the initial depreciation has already been hit. And also he’s giving to you at trade plus hst which is not what you’d pay to pick one up at a dealer (used) or on auto trade/Kijiji. Basically trade in value is the Wholesale price of the vehicle.

Thus you’re only remaining concern is the repairs. Since you have warranty on the two other largest potential repair items, the electric motor and battery, you’ll only need to worry about the things that don’t normally break. This would be things like entertainment systems, hvac components, windows and doors, etc. These things don’t normally break and if they did they would be on par for vehicles in that price range. The big repairs comes from suspension repairs and engine repairs. Which you only have one of, thus your repair costs will only really come from suspension work.

TLDR, it’s a good deal, you should get it, repair/maintenance is negligible compared to ICE & fuel savings offsets high initial purchase price.
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Sorry -- I updated the original post -- the purchase price would be the trade-in-amount plus the HST advantage he would have received (i.e. $51,770 + $6,730 = $58,500). Unfortunately, I'd have to pay HST on the $58,500 because Tesla won't facilitate a trade-in with a private buyer already identified.

My purchase price doesn't really have much to do with its resale value in four years -- whether I paid $20K, $80K, or $60K for it, the resale will be the same :)

The hourly rate ($170/hr) isn't far off of BMW ($130/hr). Depending on how the car is built, a similar repair could be more/less difficult (and require more/less time) than a BMW.

Yes -- one fear is that the Tesla company could cease to exist, in which case the resale would plummet. If the company still exists in 4 years, I'm thinking that I could reasonably expect to sell the car for $25K in four years from now.
Last edited by VifferFun on Jun 3rd, 2019 2:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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VifferFun wrote: Hi Everyone!

My neighbour is buying a new P100D and has offered me his 2015 Tesla Model S P85D (with "Ludicrous Mode" for 2.8 second 0-60) at the trade-in-amount plus HST. Compared to anything I see on AutoTrader, this is a great deal and I know that be absolutely babied it. The car has about 110,000 kms on the odometer and the only issue that he's had in four years required a $150 part. It's been extremely reliable for him (and he's very particular, so he would report even the smallest issue). We went for a ride on the weekend and when he punched the throttle unexpectedly at a light, I nearly had a heart attack -- it accelerates like my sport bike!

I believe that some of the poor reliability reports online for the Model S online relate to the earlier models (2012/13) when they were ironing out the details of the new model. I'm on my third BMW so I'm no stranger to repairs, but how would the 2015 Model S compare? The drivetrain and battery are still warrantied for another 4 years, but it's everything else (suspension, electronics, brakes, etc.) that I'd have to pay for out of pocket. Is there a site or something with common repair costs? Are there big-ticket items that commonly fail that could cost me $1000s? I see REALLY high mileage Model S's out there (250K+ kms) and I also see Teslas being used as service vehicles which would indicate to me that the maintenance can't be THAT bad?

Also, does anyone have a guess at what a 2015 Model S would resalte for in 4 years from now (i.e. an 8yo model with about 170K) when I consider buying my neghbour's new P100D? :)

Thanks!
All that info and you dont tell us how much hes asking? LOL

How can we tell you how much it will be worth in 4 years if you did not tell us the price he is asking today?
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VifferFun wrote: If the company still exists in 4 years, I'm thinking that I could reasonably expect to sell the car for $25K in four years from now.
wow, that's some resale... I for one would never buy a 2015 electric car in 2023 for $25k. lol.

But yeah, sounds like a deal you have there. You should jump on it.
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With ludicrous mode, this is a $150,000 car new, so expect costs for replacement parts to reflect that.

You don't have to worry about the drivetrain or the battery as it's under warranty. Your biggest cost will probably be brakes and tires. Those you can get done anywhere, the parts are not Tesla specific.

You are basically at the price of a brand new Model 3, so if you want something fully under warranty, you might want to consider buying new instead. Costs on replacement parts should be lower on the Model 3 as well as it's a more mass production vehicle, parts will be easier to come by.
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koffey wrote: wow, that's some resale... I for one would never buy a 2015 electric car in 2023 for $25k. lol.

But yeah, sounds like a deal you have there. You should jump on it.
The three 2012's (7 years old) on auto trader in Canada are listed between $50 and 54k right now. They will for sure sell for less than that with all the new EV options coming out, but $25k+ would probably be pretty accurate.
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Since there's no CBB data, that price is about a bit below average on what's being posted to Autotrader.

Go in budgeting that you are buying a out of warranty S class and you would be fine.
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vaportech wrote: There’s a difference between maintenance and repair costs. Maintenance is required stuff to keep a vehicle running meaning brakes, tires, oil changes, those sort of things. Repairs are things not normally replaced that need to be replace when “broken” essentially non wear and tear items.

Since electric vehicles are low maintenance, because no ICE. You’re limited to brakes, tires, wipers and suspension. So already it’s beating your BMW which would require engine maintenance. Also electrics use the drivetrain to capture brake force to regen battery, thus saves your brake components and extends life thus your maintenance ask goes down from a comparable ICE.
Thanks for your thoughful post. First, just to clarify -- the purchase price would be the trade-in-amount plus the HST advantage he would have received (i.e. $51,770 + $6,730 = $58,500). Unfortunately, I'd have to pay HST on the $58,500 because Tesla won't facilitate a trade-in with a private buyer already identified.

Certainly, I agree about the difference between maintenance and repair costs -- that's why I was asking for both :) Maintenance should be pretty low on the EV, so the part I fear the most (and the part that is the most uncertain) is the repairs.
vaportech wrote: You’ll get fuel savings which would also offset the higher purchase price of an electric. Since fuel is a fixed cost, meaning the difference of price of fuel (gas vs electric) would change depending on the market, but your distance driven wouldn’t change, meaning you will get from point a to b regardless if electric or gas. Thus the $/km for fuel would change because your now paying electric and not gas.
I've already accounted for the fuel savings in my financial analysis -- I'm a numbers guy :) At this point the variable I'm just trying to understand is the potential for future repairs.
vaportech wrote: Since it’s used it’s also a good deal, the initial depreciation has already been hit. And also he’s giving to you at trade plus hst which is not what you’d pay to pick one up at a dealer (used) or on auto trade/Kijiji. Basically trade in value is the Wholesale price of the vehicle.
For sure, I was thinking the same thing. My neighbour paid ~$135K (before tax) less than four years ago, so I'd say that it's already depreciated about 55% in four years. If I assume that it's resale value today is $60K and depreciate it by the same amount, then it would be worth about $26K in four years. I think this is a conservative estimate since cars depreciate more in years 1-4 than they does in years 5-8, and I'll also only be putting on about 60K to 80K kms in four years time.
vaportech wrote: Thus you’re only remaining concern is the repairs. Since you have warranty on the two other largest potential repair items, the electric motor and battery, you’ll only need to worry about the things that don’t normally break. This would be things like entertainment systems, hvac components, windows and doors, etc. These things don’t normally break and if they did they would be on par for vehicles in that price range. The big repairs comes from suspension repairs and engine repairs. Which you only have one of, thus your repair costs will only really come from suspension work.
Exactly :) I guess my worry is about the items not related to the drivetrain and battery. Do you think that repair for these items would actually be on par with other $100K vehicles, or would it cost more because it's Tesla? That's what I'm trying to determine :)
vaportech wrote: TLDR, it’s a good deal, you should get it, repair/maintenance is negligible compared to ICE & fuel savings offsets high initial purchase price.
It's certainly a good deal relative to the other Model S offers on AutoTrader. One of the selling features of this specific car is that I know it's history -- my neighbour babies it and has loved to tell me everything about it over the last 4 years :) He's a retired electrical engineer so he's particularly fascinated by Tesla. I'd be MUCH more hesitant if I was buying it off a used-car dealer lot.

Thanks!
Last edited by VifferFun on Jun 3rd, 2019 2:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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koffey wrote: wow, that's some resale... I for one would never buy a 2015 electric car in 2023 for $25k. lol.

But yeah, sounds like a deal you have there. You should jump on it.
It's high, but I don't think it's unreasonable (unless something bad happens to Tesla). My neighbour paid ~$135K (before tax) less than four years ago, so I'd say that it's already depreciated about 55% in four years. If I assume that it's resale value today is $60K and depreciate it by the same amount, then it would be worth about $25K in four years. I think this is a conservative estimate since cars depreciate more in years 1-4 than they does in years 5-8, and I'll also only be putting on about 60K to 80K kms in four years time. Additionally, this model year includes free supercharging for life (which isn't offered with the newer models, and this might be desired in the resale market).
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TheTall wrote: With ludicrous mode, this is a $150,000 car new, so expect costs for replacement parts to reflect that.

You don't have to worry about the drivetrain or the battery as it's under warranty. Your biggest cost will probably be brakes and tires. Those you can get done anywhere, the parts are not Tesla specific.

You are basically at the price of a brand new Model 3, so if you want something fully under warranty, you might want to consider buying new instead. Costs on replacement parts should be lower on the Model 3 as well as it's a more mass production vehicle, parts will be easier to come by.
Yes -- he paid about $135K before tax; however, the "Ludicrous Mode" doesn't really make the car any more expesnive to repair the the base Model S. The upgrade to Ludicrous simply required a few small parts and a software update -- most of the hardware was already there.

I've given thought to buying a new Model 3 as well, but I'm a bit of a "car guy" and value performance. The Model S with Ludicrous is, well, ludicrous! For a similar price ($50K + tax after considering the rebate) I'd only be getting The "Model 3 Standard Range Plus". But I really don't like the aethetics of the Model 3, and I really don't like the dash/interior of the Model 3 either. And the Model S with Ludicruous does the 0-60 in 2.8 seconds vs 5.6 seconds for the Model 3 -- that's a big difference! :P
Last edited by VifferFun on Jun 3rd, 2019 2:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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TheTall wrote: The three 2012's (7 years old) on auto trader in Canada are listed between $50 and 54k right now. They will for sure sell for less than that with all the new EV options coming out, but $25k+ would probably be pretty accurate.
VifferFun wrote: It's high, but I don't think it's unreasonable (unless something bad happens to Tesla). My neighbour paid ~$135K (before tax) less than four years ago, so I'd say that it's already depreciated about 55% in four years. If I assume that it's resale value today is $60K and depreciate it by the same amount, then it would be worth about $25K in four years. I think this is a conservative estimate since cars depreciate more in years 1-4 than they does in years 5-8, and I'll also only be putting on about 60K to 80K kms in four years time. Additionally, this model year includes free supercharging for life (which isn't offered with the newer models, and this might be desired in the resale market).
Not saying that it probably isn't worth it, I don't know but I know I wouldn't pay for it lol. The tech is going to be 9 years old, although, not sure how much it will change. Is there a method to test for degradation?
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110k km in less than 4 years. Is that normal?

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