Automotive

2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 14th, 2019 2:01 am
Deal Expert
User avatar
Apr 21, 2004
54414 posts
19267 upvotes
Only QC has an $8k provincial incentive while BC has $5k I believe.

If a car is warranted today,I would go with a Toyota Hybrid because maintenance is not expensive even at the dealership and we know it will last a long time.

Many BEVs are overpriced while lacking ACC and heated steering or in the case of Tesla S, have not had a long enough history past the eight year DU and battery warranty.

With a Corolla hybrid, 200k km traveled is probably less than $15k in fuel cost. That is much lower than many BEV premiums.
Banned
User avatar
Jul 17, 2008
11042 posts
3835 upvotes
alanbrenton wrote: Only QC has an $8k provincial incentive while BC has $5k I believe.

If a car is warranted today,I would go with a Toyota Hybrid because maintenance is not expensive even at the dealership and we know it will last a long time.

Many BEVs are overpriced while lacking ACC and heated steering or in the case of Tesla S, have not had a long enough history past the eight year DU and battery warranty.

With a Corolla hybrid, 200k km traveled is probably less than $15k in fuel cost. That is much lower than many BEV premiums.
Cost should be at least the same as ICE since it has all the components. Not sure what maintenance is required for the hybrid part (not counting repairs).

Can't comment on other BEV's, but apparently the new Teslas battery (on Model 3) will run at least 500k miles (so 800k kms). They have a car doing runs to get to 1mil miles. So the car itself will be obsolete before the battery screws up.

And the 200km for 15$ is probably in-city. On a hwy, hybrids consume almost as much as ICE since there is no regen braking charging up the hybrid battery. They have an advantage that the engine is smaller capacity (1-1.3L vs regular 1.8+). But that's a difference because regular ICE cars manufacturers don't want to put smaller engines like in Europe. There I have a van type with a 1.2L that gets 5L/100km on hwy, regular ICE.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Apr 21, 2004
54414 posts
19267 upvotes
Messerschmitt wrote: Cost should be at least the same as ICE since it has all the components. Not sure what maintenance is required for the hybrid part (not counting repairs).

Can't comment on other BEV's, but apparently the new Teslas battery (on Model 3) will run at least 500k miles (so 800k kms). They have a car doing runs to get to 1mil miles. So the car itself will be obsolete before the battery screws up.

And the 200km for 15$ is probably in-city. On a hwy, hybrids consume almost as much as ICE since there is no regen braking charging up the hybrid battery. They have an advantage that the engine is smaller capacity (1-1.3L vs regular 1.8+). But that's a difference because regular ICE cars manufacturers don't want to put smaller engines like in Europe. There I have a van type with a 1.2L that gets 5L/100km on hwy, regular ICE.
There is no starter, alternator. The water pump and HVAC are electric and not mechanical. Transmission is e-CVT, which is made of planetary gears and are very reliable. Brakes last more than twice an ICEV, I know as we have a 16 RAV4H with 65k now and brake pads are still more than 70%. The only savings with BEV is when owners shun the dealership for servicing. An ICEV owner can do that to, if they so choose, as long as they get the oil changed for $70 every 16k km. It's not going to break the bank account.

There have been reports on TMC that some TM3 drive units conked out at 3k miles. I read those threads. I will likely get a Tesla once its vehicle offers torque vectoring and unlimited distance warranty for eight years, like the S and X. If Tesla thinks its DU and battery can last 1m miles, I think they should offer a better warranty (once more BEVS come out) to differentiate themselves and push people like myself (concerned with reliability) to buy a Tesla. I don't like buying below average reliability cars so I have to wait for more data points and confirm that Tesla has turned the corner on quality. Also, no torque vectoring on any Tesla for now so I'll wait for a BEV with electric torque vectoring. Some of those Tesla's that have done hundreds of thousands of miles have had the batteries replaced.

Our RAV4H can do 15 km per liter on the highway because the engines run on the Atkinson cycle (not Ottoman used by most ICEV). I know because the lower than 15 km per liter (short distance driving) goes up to 15km when I drive 110 on the highway for a longer period. I don't hypermile but I do observe these MPG subtleties because it's a way to tell if there's anything wrong with the engine/system if MPG drops significantly.

200k km divided by 15 km per liter is 13,333.33 liters so my $15k gasoline quote over 200k km is actually based on the 16 RAV4H in hindsight. I think I was thinking about the fuel cost of my 11 Accord. The Corolla is 33% more efficient than that so it's $10k for 200k km. You can see that the Corolla hybrid can actually operate much cheaper than most BEVs out there, except used ones. But used BEVs are highly compromised right now. Leafs don't have TMS and offer short driving distance between charges, the i3's are still going for $25k or more.

Eventually going BEV (what I'm going to do) will make sense but for now, the typically BEV premium doesn't justify the fuel cost savings for most households.
Newbie
User avatar
Jun 20, 2012
79 posts
114 upvotes
Aurora
Messerschmitt wrote: For 30k, might as well pay 12k more and get a tesla or any other BEV after incentives. With a hybrid you still spend 50%-25% in fuel (depending if you had sedan or SUV) and all the maintenance related expenses (oil, engine, transmission, convertor, etc).

Just my opinion
Please let me know where you can get a Tesla for 42k in Ont.
At even 5L /100km at $1.5 per L. (this Corolla is suppose to be better than that and gas is not that bad yet) That's $7.50/100km. That 10k can get me 133,333 KM of gas +1k for at least 10 synthetic oil changes +1k for misc expenses.
Even if there was zero maintenance on a EV and you have solar panels charging your car the difference in price is still huge at the moment
Deal Guru
Nov 19, 2010
14652 posts
2323 upvotes
Toronto
alanbrenton wrote: Wilson, when your car stops for those few seconds, would auto braking ( no need to step on brake pedal) ensue and if so, would pressing "resume" automatically releases the auto braking?

Thanks
Yes, that is exactly what happens. The brake lights also turn on and the car comes to a complete stop if the car in front is not moving. The brake automatically lets go when you allow the system to resume again.
Last edited by wilsonlam97 on Sep 30th, 2019 1:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Guru
Nov 19, 2010
14652 posts
2323 upvotes
Toronto
alanbrenton wrote: Only QC has an $8k provincial incentive while BC has $5k I believe.

If a car is warranted today,I would go with a Toyota Hybrid because maintenance is not expensive even at the dealership and we know it will last a long time.

Many BEVs are overpriced while lacking ACC and heated steering or in the case of Tesla S, have not had a long enough history past the eight year DU and battery warranty.

With a Corolla hybrid, 200k km traveled is probably less than $15k in fuel cost. That is much lower than many BEV premiums.
I recently did 900KM for less than $40. But the car is still new so this will be worse over some time. You can comfortably drive from Toronto to Ottawa and back on one tank with 100KM of range leftover.
Deal Guru
Nov 19, 2010
14652 posts
2323 upvotes
Toronto
Messerschmitt wrote: Cost should be at least the same as ICE since it has all the components. Not sure what maintenance is required for the hybrid part (not counting repairs).

Can't comment on other BEV's, but apparently the new Teslas battery (on Model 3) will run at least 500k miles (so 800k kms). They have a car doing runs to get to 1mil miles. So the car itself will be obsolete before the battery screws up.

And the 200km for 15$ is probably in-city. On a hwy, hybrids consume almost as much as ICE since there is no regen braking charging up the hybrid battery. They have an advantage that the engine is smaller capacity (1-1.3L vs regular 1.8+). But that's a difference because regular ICE cars manufacturers don't want to put smaller engines like in Europe. There I have a van type with a 1.2L that gets 5L/100km on hwy, regular ICE.
The Corolla Hybrid actually performs best on the highway. 100KM consumes less than 3.7l in my testing. But keep in mind the car is still brand new so this will go up a bit. The reason I chose the Corolla Hybrid is because I’ve been using the 2nd gen Prius for years and it has been very reliable. Maintenance is pretty much only oil changes (which can be safely done at 20,000km or more on a Prius). Also the whole point of hybrids is that they do have regen (although never as strong as a BEV). My brakes didn’t get replaced until the 230,000km mark.

The Tesla is way more fun. The Corolla Hybrid is undeniably the cheapest car to run in terms of fuel and purchase price. Toyota makes a very reliable hybrid drivetrain that keeps going on forever. The two cars are simply not in the same price bracket and have two very different purchasing criteria.
Sr. Member
Mar 16, 2007
739 posts
74 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
How is the acceleration of Corolla Hybrid compared to Corolla LE? How is the merging on a highway? Would like to hear from people who owns one.

I went to a dealership in Mississauga but they did not have Hybrid for a Test drive. I test drove Corolla LE.
Newbie
Jul 30, 2004
72 posts
70 upvotes
Vancouver
xcel wrote: How is the acceleration of Corolla Hybrid compared to Corolla LE? How is the merging on a highway? Would like to hear from people who owns one.

I went to a dealership in Mississauga but they did not have Hybrid for a Test drive. I test drove Corolla LE.
The power is there when you need it. However you will find that your fuel economy will be negatively affected if you push beyond "eco" and into the "power" range. It's surprising the impact to your average fuel economy.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
35087 posts
21056 upvotes
Center of Universe
cloverwall wrote: The power is there when you need it. However you will find that your fuel economy will be negatively affected if you push beyond "eco" and into the "power" range. It's surprising the impact to your average fuel economy.
Power?
121 horsepower and 105 lb-ft of torque!

Top