Automotive

2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 14th, 2019 2:01 am
Deal Guru
Nov 19, 2010
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Toronto
Portalz wrote: So is anyone actually trying to buy a Corolla Hybrid? My wife and I have given up on trying to find a deal. We were fighting like crazy just to get $300 off. The dealerships have been so annoying to deal with. One said it was cause they are selling them really well which I think is true.

Anyone have any luck? And if so in the GTA please let me know which dealership.
Use Unhaggle but do not pay for the service. Your information will be sent to multiple dealerships and they will try to win your business. Play hard to get and do not name a price (Google: price anchoring). The discount on the Corolla Hybrid I got was $2399.

You can get a lot of discounts because the salesperson can play around with freight fees, vehicle discounts, and even give you the premium package near-cost. They already know they can do this though so don’t bother asking.

The best price for the premium package with regular paint is $26,866.70 + hst (all inclusive). MSRP pricing at a non-shady dealer is $29,265.70 + hst if they don’t inflate their “normal” price.
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Jun 20, 2012
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Aurora
wilsonlam97 wrote: Just got the 2020 Corolla Hybrid and it’s an excellent car. The number of features it has is incredible and the fuel economy is outstanding. You can get around 1000km range on a $45 tank of fuel. I got a total discount of $2400 after getting a discount on freight and other fees on top of a vehicle discount.

Also it seems the car is made in Japan for this trim and model year so I’m hopeful that the workmanship is top notch.
thank you so much for the pic

we just ordered one at the same price

this was better then even my wifes work perks or trying to use the unhaggle report on some annoying ass sales rep

Just wondering if anyone here got the ECP?
Member
Nov 6, 2016
251 posts
148 upvotes
wilsonlam97 wrote: Just got the 2020 Corolla Hybrid and it’s an excellent car. The number of features it has is incredible and the fuel economy is outstanding. You can get around 1000km range on a $45 tank of fuel. I got a total discount of $2400 after getting a discount on freight and other fees on top of a vehicle discount.

Also it seems the car is made in Japan for this trim and model year so I’m hopeful that the workmanship is top notch.
What was your OTD price? if you dont mind me asking.
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Apr 21, 2004
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This can have heated steering wheel yet the 2020 Camry can't.

Probably doesn't matter much unless the single occupant doesn't mind not turning the heater on. Heating with the compressor on still makes our RAV4H gasoline engine kick in more frequently.
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Dec 21, 2013
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GTA
wilsonlam97 wrote: That’s very impressive. I get around 3.9l/100km but I like to pass on the left on the highway.

Also, did anyone else realize that the lane centering feature is just as good as Tesla Autopilot V1? It can follow the car ahead when lane markings aren’t available and pretty much drives itself when you bypass the “hold steering” alert. I just did a 800KM roundtrip drive and barely had to touch the steering wheel. It even comes to a complete stop in stop and go traffic.

Can you please advise how the autonomous tech in the car behaves in normal traffic (read: 401 rush hour)?

Is it safe to assume the car will keep centered and crawl along automatically during bumper to bumper traffic?

The 2019 Mazda 3 was OK when I test drove it. Lane keeping was dodgy, quite a delay in going during stop and go traffic. My 2018 Camry XSE was dismal. Although there was no stop and go on that car, the lane keeping assist bounced me back and forth between the lines for about 10 times consistently until it got very unstable and I had to take over.
Deal Guru
Nov 19, 2010
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georgecantstandya wrote: Can you please advise how the autonomous tech in the car behaves in normal traffic (read: 401 rush hour)?

Is it safe to assume the car will keep centered and crawl along automatically during bumper to bumper traffic?

The 2019 Mazda 3 was OK when I test drove it. Lane keeping was dodgy, quite a delay in going during stop and go traffic. My 2018 Camry XSE was dismal. Although there was no stop and go on that car, the lane keeping assist bounced me back and forth between the lines for about 10 times consistently until it got very unstable and I had to take over.
Yes it stays perfectly centred in 401 bumper-to-bumper traffic. If the traffic brings you to a halt for more than a second or two then you have to resume cruise by pressing on the accelerator or cruise control speed buttons. No ping-ponging. Pretty much works like Autopilot v1 (with all the same caveats/convenience).
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Jul 17, 2008
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For 30k, might as well pay 12k more and get a tesla or any other BEV after incentives. With a hybrid you still spend 50%-25% in fuel (depending if you had sedan or SUV) and all the maintenance related expenses (oil, engine, transmission, convertor, etc).

Just my opinion
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Wilson, when your car stops for those few seconds, would auto braking ( no need to step on brake pedal) ensue and if so, would pressing "resume" automatically releases the auto braking?

Thanks
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Only QC has an $8k provincial incentive while BC has $5k I believe.

If a car is warranted today,I would go with a Toyota Hybrid because maintenance is not expensive even at the dealership and we know it will last a long time.

Many BEVs are overpriced while lacking ACC and heated steering or in the case of Tesla S, have not had a long enough history past the eight year DU and battery warranty.

With a Corolla hybrid, 200k km traveled is probably less than $15k in fuel cost. That is much lower than many BEV premiums.
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alanbrenton wrote: Only QC has an $8k provincial incentive while BC has $5k I believe.

If a car is warranted today,I would go with a Toyota Hybrid because maintenance is not expensive even at the dealership and we know it will last a long time.

Many BEVs are overpriced while lacking ACC and heated steering or in the case of Tesla S, have not had a long enough history past the eight year DU and battery warranty.

With a Corolla hybrid, 200k km traveled is probably less than $15k in fuel cost. That is much lower than many BEV premiums.
Cost should be at least the same as ICE since it has all the components. Not sure what maintenance is required for the hybrid part (not counting repairs).

Can't comment on other BEV's, but apparently the new Teslas battery (on Model 3) will run at least 500k miles (so 800k kms). They have a car doing runs to get to 1mil miles. So the car itself will be obsolete before the battery screws up.

And the 200km for 15$ is probably in-city. On a hwy, hybrids consume almost as much as ICE since there is no regen braking charging up the hybrid battery. They have an advantage that the engine is smaller capacity (1-1.3L vs regular 1.8+). But that's a difference because regular ICE cars manufacturers don't want to put smaller engines like in Europe. There I have a van type with a 1.2L that gets 5L/100km on hwy, regular ICE.
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Messerschmitt wrote: Cost should be at least the same as ICE since it has all the components. Not sure what maintenance is required for the hybrid part (not counting repairs).

Can't comment on other BEV's, but apparently the new Teslas battery (on Model 3) will run at least 500k miles (so 800k kms). They have a car doing runs to get to 1mil miles. So the car itself will be obsolete before the battery screws up.

And the 200km for 15$ is probably in-city. On a hwy, hybrids consume almost as much as ICE since there is no regen braking charging up the hybrid battery. They have an advantage that the engine is smaller capacity (1-1.3L vs regular 1.8+). But that's a difference because regular ICE cars manufacturers don't want to put smaller engines like in Europe. There I have a van type with a 1.2L that gets 5L/100km on hwy, regular ICE.
There is no starter, alternator. The water pump and HVAC are electric and not mechanical. Transmission is e-CVT, which is made of planetary gears and are very reliable. Brakes last more than twice an ICEV, I know as we have a 16 RAV4H with 65k now and brake pads are still more than 70%. The only savings with BEV is when owners shun the dealership for servicing. An ICEV owner can do that to, if they so choose, as long as they get the oil changed for $70 every 16k km. It's not going to break the bank account.

There have been reports on TMC that some TM3 drive units conked out at 3k miles. I read those threads. I will likely get a Tesla once its vehicle offers torque vectoring and unlimited distance warranty for eight years, like the S and X. If Tesla thinks its DU and battery can last 1m miles, I think they should offer a better warranty (once more BEVS come out) to differentiate themselves and push people like myself (concerned with reliability) to buy a Tesla. I don't like buying below average reliability cars so I have to wait for more data points and confirm that Tesla has turned the corner on quality. Also, no torque vectoring on any Tesla for now so I'll wait for a BEV with electric torque vectoring. Some of those Tesla's that have done hundreds of thousands of miles have had the batteries replaced.

Our RAV4H can do 15 km per liter on the highway because the engines run on the Atkinson cycle (not Ottoman used by most ICEV). I know because the lower than 15 km per liter (short distance driving) goes up to 15km when I drive 110 on the highway for a longer period. I don't hypermile but I do observe these MPG subtleties because it's a way to tell if there's anything wrong with the engine/system if MPG drops significantly.

200k km divided by 15 km per liter is 13,333.33 liters so my $15k gasoline quote over 200k km is actually based on the 16 RAV4H in hindsight. I think I was thinking about the fuel cost of my 11 Accord. The Corolla is 33% more efficient than that so it's $10k for 200k km. You can see that the Corolla hybrid can actually operate much cheaper than most BEVs out there, except used ones. But used BEVs are highly compromised right now. Leafs don't have TMS and offer short driving distance between charges, the i3's are still going for $25k or more.

Eventually going BEV (what I'm going to do) will make sense but for now, the typically BEV premium doesn't justify the fuel cost savings for most households.
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Jun 20, 2012
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Aurora
Messerschmitt wrote: For 30k, might as well pay 12k more and get a tesla or any other BEV after incentives. With a hybrid you still spend 50%-25% in fuel (depending if you had sedan or SUV) and all the maintenance related expenses (oil, engine, transmission, convertor, etc).

Just my opinion
Please let me know where you can get a Tesla for 42k in Ont.
At even 5L /100km at $1.5 per L. (this Corolla is suppose to be better than that and gas is not that bad yet) That's $7.50/100km. That 10k can get me 133,333 KM of gas +1k for at least 10 synthetic oil changes +1k for misc expenses.
Even if there was zero maintenance on a EV and you have solar panels charging your car the difference in price is still huge at the moment
Deal Guru
Nov 19, 2010
14618 posts
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Toronto
alanbrenton wrote: Wilson, when your car stops for those few seconds, would auto braking ( no need to step on brake pedal) ensue and if so, would pressing "resume" automatically releases the auto braking?

Thanks
Yes, that is exactly what happens. The brake lights also turn on and the car comes to a complete stop if the car in front is not moving. The brake automatically lets go when you allow the system to resume again.
Last edited by wilsonlam97 on Sep 30th, 2019 1:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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